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Itamar Franco

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2011
Itamar Franco Former president helped Brazil tame inflation Itamar Franco, 81, former Brazilian president who in the 1990s tamed inflation in Latin America's biggest country, died of a stroke Saturday at Sao Paulo's Albert Einstein hospital, the hospital said in a statement. He had been hospitalized since May after being diagnosed with leukemia and pneumonia. Franco became president in 1992 after Fernando Collor de Mello stepped down to avoid being impeached as a result of corruption charges.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2011
Itamar Franco Former president helped Brazil tame inflation Itamar Franco, 81, former Brazilian president who in the 1990s tamed inflation in Latin America's biggest country, died of a stroke Saturday at Sao Paulo's Albert Einstein hospital, the hospital said in a statement. He had been hospitalized since May after being diagnosed with leukemia and pneumonia. Franco became president in 1992 after Fernando Collor de Mello stepped down to avoid being impeached as a result of corruption charges.
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NEWS
December 31, 1992 | JEB BLOUNT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his first speech to the nation, Itamar Franco, Brazil's new president, promised Wednesday to lead Latin America's largest country out of recession, poverty and corruption and to set it on a course away from the "false modernity" of his disgraced predecessor, Fernando Collor de Mello. Franco, who had been acting president since Collor was impeached on influence-peddling charges on Sept. 29, formally assumed office on Tuesday. He took office after Collor, facing a Senate trial, resigned.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Itamar Franco came to power in October after the impeachment of Fernando Collor de Mello, Brazilians hoped that the government would start coming to grips with Brazil's pressing economic problems. Those hopes are fading as Franco fails to organize a convincing offensive against a painful recession and inflation of more than 1,000% a year. Two Franco finance ministers have struck out so far, and expectations are gloomy for a third one now at bat.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | From Associated Press
Itamar Franco became Brazil's acting president Friday and immediately created controversy by naming a little-known politician from a poor state to the key post of finance minister. In a low-key ceremony that lasted four minutes, Franco, formerly vice president, took over from President Fernando Collor de Mello, who was stripped of power by a vote of Congress on Tuesday. Franco's first appointment was Rep. Gustavo Krause as finance minister.
NEWS
September 30, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after Fernando Collor de Mello was elected president in December, 1989, he scheduled a meeting with Itamar Franco, his vice president-elect. Collor kept Franco waiting three hours, then bluntly told him that his opinion wasn't needed for selecting a Cabinet. Now, the tables are turned. It is Collor, 43, who is suffering humiliation and the 61-year-old Franco who is riding high.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Itamar Franco came to power in October after the impeachment of Fernando Collor de Mello, Brazilians hoped that the government would start coming to grips with Brazil's pressing economic problems. Those hopes are fading as Franco fails to organize a convincing offensive against a painful recession and inflation of more than 1,000% a year. Two Franco finance ministers have struck out so far, and expectations are gloomy for a third one now at bat.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Brazil's general election campaign got off to an official start when Finance Minister Fernando Henrique Cardoso announced his candidacy to succeed President Itamar Franco in the Oct. 3 elections. Cardoso, widely expected to run, said he will campaign on an anti-inflation platform based on his economic stabilization program.
NEWS
February 2, 1993
Brazilians are focusing increased attention on a constitutionally mandated plebiscite, scheduled for April 21, that could do away with their presidential system of government. Their choice: Retain the current system, switch to a parliamentary system or resurrect a monarchy overthrown in 1889. If the plebiscite changes the form of government, Congress will have until Jan. 1, 1995, to work out details.
SPORTS
July 18, 1994 | ELLIOTT ALMOND
Brazilian soccer players have long memories, which is why the World Cup victory tour will begin in Recife, a town 1,800 miles northwest of Rio de Janeiro. Last year, when Brazil suffered its first qualifying-round defeat--to Bolivia in La Paz--the team was besieged by criticism from throughout the country, where the loss was viewed as nothing short of a national disaster. Except in Recife.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | JEB BLOUNT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In his first speech to the nation, Itamar Franco, Brazil's new president, promised Wednesday to lead Latin America's largest country out of recession, poverty and corruption and to set it on a course away from the "false modernity" of his disgraced predecessor, Fernando Collor de Mello. Franco, who had been acting president since Collor was impeached on influence-peddling charges on Sept. 29, formally assumed office on Tuesday. He took office after Collor, facing a Senate trial, resigned.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | From Associated Press
Itamar Franco became Brazil's acting president Friday and immediately created controversy by naming a little-known politician from a poor state to the key post of finance minister. In a low-key ceremony that lasted four minutes, Franco, formerly vice president, took over from President Fernando Collor de Mello, who was stripped of power by a vote of Congress on Tuesday. Franco's first appointment was Rep. Gustavo Krause as finance minister.
NEWS
September 30, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon after Fernando Collor de Mello was elected president in December, 1989, he scheduled a meeting with Itamar Franco, his vice president-elect. Collor kept Franco waiting three hours, then bluntly told him that his opinion wasn't needed for selecting a Cabinet. Now, the tables are turned. It is Collor, 43, who is suffering humiliation and the 61-year-old Franco who is riding high.
NEWS
December 19, 1994 | Reuters
Brazilian troops will patrol the beaches here throughout the summer as part of a larger campaign to crack down on crime, Globo newspaper reported Sunday. The anti-crime operation, ordered by President Itamar Franco on Oct. 31, is mainly directed against drug trafficking in the city's shantytowns. Over the past month, troops have occupied a number of slums for up to several days, confiscating both drugs and arms and reportedly reducing drug dealing in those areas.
NEWS
March 29, 1994
Brazil on Thursday marks the 30th anniversary of the military coup that ushered in 21 years of authoritarian rule by a succession of five army generals. As the date approaches, Brazilian media have been reviewing the controversial coup and 1964-1985 military regime with a flurry of analyses. The recollections have coincided with a confrontation between civilian President Itamar Franco and Brazil's lower house of congress and supreme court.
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