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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2009 | By Robert Faturechi
Despite being more famous than any other judge at the criminal courthouse in downtown Los Angeles, Lance Ito's courtroom is the hardest to find. Each courtroom is adorned with a placard at the door naming its presiding judge. But Ito's placard holder stays woefully empty. Since the judge became a household name more than a decade ago presiding over the O.J. Simpson murder trial, his placard has been stolen time and again. He's tried replacing it, he's tried gluing it, but the darn thing just keeps disappearing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
In a return to form for the most prestigious award in architecture, Japan's Toyo Ito has won this year's Pritzker Prize. After honoring younger and lesser-known figures in recent years -- including 49-year-old Chinese architect Wang Shu in 2012 -- the Pritzker jury this year chose a well-established architect with 40 years of built work to his credit. For at least a decade Ito has been a presumed Pritzker front-runner. Along with Tadao Ando, the 1995 Pritzker laureate, the 71-year-old Ito is the dean of Japanese architecture, though with his mop of black hair he looks many years younger.
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NEWS
January 19, 1995 | JIM NEWTON and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Handing prosecutors in the trial of O.J. Simpson their most important victory to date, Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito ruled Wednesday that they may tell the jury about more than a dozen incidents in which the former football star allegedly beat, frightened and stalked Nicole Brown Simpson during their tempestuous relationship. The ruling came on a day in which defense attorneys publicly announced that they had mended an embarrassing rift.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Christopher Knight
Two new installations by Parker Ito in his Los Angeles solo debut diagram artistic relationships, no doubt underscored by the new realities of a digital world. That is both their considerable strength and an unavoidable weakness. The front room at Steve Turner Contemporary features a sequence of large abstract paintings suspended at varying angles from the ceiling. Each was spray-painted as it leaned against one of the surrounding walls, where the residue of the action leaves painted marks outlining the now-ghostly places once occupied by the paintings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito slightly relaxed the restrictions on jurors in the O.J. Simpson murder trial Tuesday, allowing them to read edited copies of newspapers and giving them the go-ahead to turn their television sets back on after a long blackout. In a detailed written order crafted by Ito after he and attorneys for the two sides reviewed jurors' comments about their television viewing habits, the judge spelled out what his painstakingly selected jurors may watch while they await the beginning of their service in the Simpson case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1995
If Judge Ito really wants to speed up court proceedings, he should let the jury use the gong from "The Gong Show." DANIEL BALDWIN Long Beach
NEWS
February 24, 1995
Text of exchanges Thursday involving Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito and Deputy Dist. Attys. Christopher A . Darden and Marcia Clark. These first comments occurred in a sidebar conference called to discuss the prosecution's objections to a line of questioning by Simpson attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr.: Cochran: They obviously haven't tried any cases in a long time and obviously don't know how, but this is cross-examination.
NEWS
May 12, 1995 | JIM NEWTON and ANDREA FORD
Superior Court Judge Lance A. Ito has tried again and again to control the courtroom behavior of lawyers in the murder trial of O.J. Simpson. He has scolded them in front of the jury and has spelled out his rules of decorum in painstaking detail. But Thursday, his response to yet another outburst was to slam his hands down on his desk, glare and take some money out of their pockets. When defense lawyer Peter Neufeld and Deputy Dist. Atty.
OPINION
February 5, 1995
I was surprised to read the letter (Jan. 29) labeling me as arrogant for having the temerity to invite my parents to attend a court session (of the O.J. Simpson trial). I had seen it as a gesture of great love and deep respect for my parents. Go figure. JUDGE LANCE A. ITO, Superior Court, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1995
It's time for Judge Lance Ito to stop trying to be Mr. Goodbench. DWIGHT CATES Ventura
SPORTS
January 21, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
  Skis in place? Check. Goggles set? Check. Position self on bar before jump? Whoops. It was one of those days for ski jumper Daiki Ito of Japan on Sunday. As you can see in the video above, Ito lost his balance while sitting on the bench at the top of the ski jump hill, preparing for his second jump of the day. He tries desperately to hang on, but loses his grip and slides all the way down the hill. A novice jumper, you must think. No, Ito was in second place at the time and has won four World Cup ski jump events in his career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2009 | By Robert Faturechi
Despite being more famous than any other judge at the criminal courthouse in downtown Los Angeles, Lance Ito's courtroom is the hardest to find. Each courtroom is adorned with a placard at the door naming its presiding judge. But Ito's placard holder stays woefully empty. Since the judge became a household name more than a decade ago presiding over the O.J. Simpson murder trial, his placard has been stolen time and again. He's tried replacing it, he's tried gluing it, but the darn thing just keeps disappearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2008 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
In a unanimous decision, the California Supreme Court found Monday that a San Quentin inmate was wrongly sentenced to death in 1982 for murder because Los Angeles district attorneys -- including current Superior Court Judges Lance A. Ito and Frederick Horn -- withheld a confession to the killing by their star witness. Adam Miranda was convicted in 1982 of the murder of Gary Black at a Los Angeles mini-mart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2007 | Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writer
It seemed like another reporting coup for TMZ.com. The celebrity website posted a video of "Judge Lance Ito," who presided over O.J. Simpson's 1995 murder trial, declaring the former football great "guilty as sin" of the crimes he is accused of in Las Vegas. One problem: It wasn't Ito. Officials at Los Angeles County Superior Court quickly informed the website about the error. "The video does not depict Judge Ito. He is not in the video, and he did not, and has not, commented in any way to TMZ.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2005 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
Starting with jury selection tomorrow, Santa Barbara County Superior Court Judge Rodney S. Melville could become known from Santa Maria to Shanghai. His rulings in the Michael Jackson child-molestation case will be debated in saloons and salons. At 63, Melville stands to become as instantly famous as Lance Ito, the Los Angeles judge who was at the helm of the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2003 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Kenji Ito, an attorney and civic leader who in 1942 successfully fought charges that he was a spy for Japan and who later became the first Japanese American admitted to the State Bar of California after World War II, died Sunday at his Alhambra home. He was 94 and had Alzheimer's disease. Born in Seattle, Ito was admitted to the California bar in 1945 and practiced law in Los Angeles for more than 50 years.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2000 | KAREN ALEXANDER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Toshiba America Electronic Components Inc. said Thursday its two top executives, including the first American to be president of a Toshiba Corp. operating company, will be leaving the Irvine firm. Toshiba America Electronic's chairman and chief executive, Hideo Ito, will return to Toshiba's headquarters in Japan by June 1, when he will become general manager of the corporation's international division.
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