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BUSINESS
May 14, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Apple Inc. has scooped up Time Warner Inc.'s HBO to feed television shows to its online iTunes store, reeling in one of the last holdouts among major channels and agreeing to a rare pricing concession to land hit shows such as "The Sopranos" and "Sex and the City." Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple said HBO programming began appearing Tuesday on iTunes. The shows cost $1.99 or $2.99 per episode, making HBO the only channel allowed to charge more than the standard $1.99 for its episodes on iTunes.
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NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Lori Grossman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Heading for Super Bowl XLV in Arlington, Texas, on Feb. 6?  The City of Arlington, in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, is offering free iPhone and Android apps, plus a mobile website, so that you can stay up-to-date on what’s going on during your stay. The interactive maps feature will help you navigate --and remember where you parked. Use the attractions and entertainment guide to get information about Cowboys Stadium or to book tee times at a local course. Keep informed with real-time news and traffic updates and check the weather forecast (you might not need a jacket, after all)
BUSINESS
June 9, 2006 | From the Associated Press
CBS Corp., which already sells episodes of its hit television shows "Survivor" and "CSI" on Google Inc.'s online video store, is now offering the downloads on Apple Computer Inc.'s iTunes Music Store. Apple's online store carries other shows from ABC, NBC and Fox. It previously offered some CBS programming, such as NCAA basketball, but not prime-time hits.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2011 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
When Walt Disney Co. looked to revamp its troubled retail stores in 2008, Chief Executive Robert A. Iger sought advice from the company's largest shareholder, a foremost expert on the consumer experience. Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs had lured theme-park-size crowds to his company's stores with daring architecture, no-pressure sales staffs and displays that enticed customers to come in and play with the tech world's sexiest toys. Though Disney sold its chain four years earlier, its name was still on the stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Less than a decade ago, a recording keyed to one song — the single — was considered dead in the water. Even though it had long been a critical part of the way music fans bought and enjoyed music, the single had become a marginal facet of the music business. Meanwhile, the record industry was waging a life-or-death battle over music piracy because the Internet had blasted open floodgates that allowed people to share their favorite music with one another across the globe, without bothering to pay for it. And then along came Steve Jobs, armed with Apple's iTunes and iPod.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2007 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Beginning this week, season premiere episodes of seven Fox Broadcasting programs will be made available for free through Apple's iTunes store, a move that highlights the TV industry's race to harness the Internet and try out potential business partners. The Fox-Apple deal is designed to expose iPod users to the upcoming season of new and returning prime-time shows. Executives with the News Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2008 | David Greenwald, Special to The Times
Artists including Neil Young and Bob Dylan have made no secret of their distaste for digital sound. But Grammy-winning producer T Bone Burnett believes he's found a way to affordably give listeners an experience akin to hearing studio master tapes. Since last fall, Burnett, the mastermind behind such roots-oriented releases as the "O Brother, Where Art Thou?" soundtrack, has been working with a team of engineers on a high-fidelity audio system called Code. He's invested his own money -- he won't say how much -- to develop the new technology and has recruited industry veterans, including John Mellencamp and , to his cause.
OPINION
October 29, 2007
Ed Burns is a filmmaker, so it's not surprising that he likes to see his work on the 40-foot screen of a movie theater. But for his eighth independent film, "Purple Violets," Burns is forsaking the silver screen in favor of flat panels and iPods. Burns, an actor-writer-director-producer whose credits include "The Brothers McMullen" and "Sidewalks of New York," is pioneering what may be a new business model for independent filmmakers. The first stop for "Purple Violets" will be on Nov.
NEWS
January 5, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Knowing what ingredients are in the foods we buy and eat is important – even when you’re in a rush at the market. Here's a cellphone app that might help, and it's free. Fooducate , a website dedicated to helping all of us to eat a little healthier, has launched a new iPhone app that allows you to scan or type in a bar code and receive an overall grade rating for a product. The grade is based on certain "bad" ingredients -- too much sugar and salt, too many additives, too much high-fructose corn syrup, etc. (Download from the iTunes App Store.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2007 | From Reuters
Retail chain Circuit City and Web music service Napster said they would jointly offer a subscription service with millions of songs, the latest effort to compete with Apple Inc.'s iTunes music store. The service will begin April 29 with a subscription cost of $14.95 a month. Individual songs may be downloaded for 99 cents. Electronics retailers and Web music services have sought new ways to team up and compete with iTunes, which has more than 80% of the U.S. market.
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