Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIvan Lins
IN THE NEWS

Ivan Lins

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The Grammy show was just getting cranked up at Staples Center when multiple-award winner Ivan Lins strolled on stage Sunday afternoon at the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa. Arguably the best Brazilian songwriter since Antonio Carlos Jobim, Lins didn't have any Grammy nominations this year, but if that thought crossed his mind, it didn't show in his performance, which was a masterful display of musicality, entertainment and communication.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The Grammy show was just getting cranked up at Staples Center when multiple-award winner Ivan Lins strolled on stage Sunday afternoon at the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa. Arguably the best Brazilian songwriter since Antonio Carlos Jobim, Lins didn't have any Grammy nominations this year, but if that thought crossed his mind, it didn't show in his performance, which was a masterful display of musicality, entertainment and communication.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Ivan Lins, in his one-night stand Thursday at the Palace, left no doubt that he is the Antonio Carlos Jobim of the 1980s. Performing to a wildly receptive crowd, most of whom watched his entire 90-minute show standing on what is theoretically the dance floor area (there are very few seats downstairs), the songwriter/singer/keyboardist was backed by a small group of heavyweights as he offered a series of selections from his fast-growing parade of hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The songs of Ivan Lins are probably exceeded only by those of Antonio Carlos Jobim in the affection of jazz musicians. The reasons are easy to hear--lush harmonies, sweeping melodies, unusual song forms and unexpected shifts of key. And, with the release of "A Love Affair: The Music of Ivan Lins" (Telarc)--featuring performances by Sting, Vanessa Williams and others--Lins' music is making inroads into the pop arena as well. No one, however, does his songs as well as he does.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
Ivan Lins, the Brazilian composer-singer, is a firm believer in inevitability. His current album, "Awa Yio" on Warner Bros. Records, is a good example. The collection employs a colorful array of folkloric styles to express its theme--a plea for the preservation of the natural beauties of Brazil. "If change is inevitable, and I feel that it is, then it is up to the artists and musicians to imagine the best way things can be," said Lins, 45, of Rio de Janeiro, during a recent visit to Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ivan Lins is not exactly one of the most familiar names in the opening day lineup of the Playboy Jazz Festival on June 12 at the Hollywood Bowl. He is, after all, on a bill that also includes such high-profile American jazz artists as Grover Washington Jr., Joshua Redman, Dianne Reeves and Hendricks & Ross. But with the exception of Antonio Carlos Jobim, no Brazilian singer-composer is regarded with more affection and admiration in the jazz community.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
You may have heard of Brazilian singer-songwriter Ivan Lins: His tunes "The Island," "Harlequin," "Love Dance," "Velas" and "Antes Que Seja Tarde" have been interpreted by such diverse artists as Sarah Vaughan, the Manhattan Transfer, Quincy Jones, Ella Fitzgerald, Lee Ritenour and George Benson.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The songs of Ivan Lins are probably exceeded only by those of Antonio Carlos Jobim in the affection of jazz musicians. The reasons are easy to hear--lush harmonies, sweeping melodies, unusual song forms and unexpected shifts of key. And, with the release of "A Love Affair: The Music of Ivan Lins" (Telarc)--featuring performances by Sting, Vanessa Williams and others--Lins' music is making inroads into the pop arena as well. No one, however, does his songs as well as he does.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1996 | Don Heckman
IVAN LINS "I'm Not Alone" Velas / TransBrasil * * * 1/2 Soft romantic jazz has gotten a bad name in these years of superficial new adult contemporary sounds. Fortunately, there are still a few artists around like Lins. The Brazilian singer-songwriter, whose works ("The Island," "Love Dance" and "Velas" among them) have long been favored by jazz musicians, is one of the rare composers with the subtlety and the lyricism to produce music that is both romantic and sophisticated.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
Bad things sometimes happen to good performers. And Brazilian singer-songwriter Ivan Lins got more than his share Wednesday night at the House of Blues. He was, first of all, saddled with a completely incompatible opening act--Japanese singer Toshi Kubota--whose complicated setup had to be removed before Lins could appear. Then, once Lins made it to the stage, close to 11 p.m., he was persistently obliged to stop and start numbers over again because of a thicket of audio problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The jazz world has known about Ivan Lins for years. Nearly two decades ago, his song "Dinorah, Dinorah" was prominently positioned in George Benson's million-selling "Give Me the Night." His songs have also been covered by Nancy Wilson--via a classic rendering of "The Island"--Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Lee Ritenour and dozens of others.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ivan Lins is not exactly one of the most familiar names in the opening day lineup of the Playboy Jazz Festival on June 12 at the Hollywood Bowl. He is, after all, on a bill that also includes such high-profile American jazz artists as Grover Washington Jr., Joshua Redman, Dianne Reeves and Hendricks & Ross. But with the exception of Antonio Carlos Jobim, no Brazilian singer-composer is regarded with more affection and admiration in the jazz community.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1996 | Don Heckman
IVAN LINS "I'm Not Alone" Velas / TransBrasil * * * 1/2 Soft romantic jazz has gotten a bad name in these years of superficial new adult contemporary sounds. Fortunately, there are still a few artists around like Lins. The Brazilian singer-songwriter, whose works ("The Island," "Love Dance" and "Velas" among them) have long been favored by jazz musicians, is one of the rare composers with the subtlety and the lyricism to produce music that is both romantic and sophisticated.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
Bad things sometimes happen to good performers. And Brazilian singer-songwriter Ivan Lins got more than his share Wednesday night at the House of Blues. He was, first of all, saddled with a completely incompatible opening act--Japanese singer Toshi Kubota--whose complicated setup had to be removed before Lins could appear. Then, once Lins made it to the stage, close to 11 p.m., he was persistently obliged to stop and start numbers over again because of a thicket of audio problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1992 | DON HECKMAN
Ivan Lins' supercharged appearance at At My Place Tuesday night was a potent reminder of the Brazilian songwriter's exceptional skills as a performer. Highly visible for the last few years as a composer whose works have been interpreted by everyone from George Benson and Quincy Jones to Ella Fitzgerald and Manhattan Transfer, Lins has been less well-known, certainly in this country, as a remarkably charismatic singer-keyboardist.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
Ivan Lins, the Brazilian composer-singer, is a firm believer in inevitability. His current album, "Awa Yio" on Warner Bros. Records, is a good example. The collection employs a colorful array of folkloric styles to express its theme--a plea for the preservation of the natural beauties of Brazil. "If change is inevitable, and I feel that it is, then it is up to the artists and musicians to imagine the best way things can be," said Lins, 45, of Rio de Janeiro, during a recent visit to Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Ivan Lins was frustrated. The Brazilian singer, who struggles with his English, couldn't think of a word. "It's . . . ahh. . . . It's . . . ," he said, sitting on a couch in his manager's office. Lins, 43, wrung his hands and looked at the ceiling, as if seeking guidance from above. He never did think of that word. "You see why I've been insecure about singing in English?" Lins asked. Lins, who's been recording in Brazil and singing in Portuguese for 17 years, recently released his first album in English, "Love Dance" (on Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | DIRK SUTRO
Brazilian music is sweeping the country again after a '60s bossa nova through America. Rock star David Byrne recently put together an album of his favorite Brazilian music, and Brazilian musicians, including many jazz players, are enjoying increased attention. In San Diego, the jazz scene shows traces of this trend. Flutist Lori Bell's new album with pianist Dave Mackay is titled "Take Me to Brazil" and includes a tune by Brazilian legend Antonio Carlos Jobim among several Brazilian numbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Ivan Lins was frustrated. The Brazilian singer, who struggles with his English, couldn't think of a word. "It's . . . ahh. . . . It's . . . ," he said, sitting on a couch in his manager's office. Lins, 43, wrung his hands and looked at the ceiling, as if seeking guidance from above. He never did think of that word. "You see why I've been insecure about singing in English?" Lins asked. Lins, who's been recording in Brazil and singing in Portuguese for 17 years, recently released his first album in English, "Love Dance" (on Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1989 | DIRK SUTRO
Brazilian music is sweeping the country again after a '60s bossa nova through America. Rock star David Byrne recently put together an album of his favorite Brazilian music, and Brazilian musicians, including many jazz players, are enjoying increased attention. In San Diego, the jazz scene shows traces of this trend. Flutist Lori Bell's new album with pianist Dave Mackay is titled "Take Me to Brazil" and includes a tune by Brazilian legend Antonio Carlos Jobim among several Brazilian numbers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|