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NEWS
September 6, 1992 | Associated Press
A judge has ordered former U.S. government officials to answer allegations that they sent an innocent man to Israel, where he was sentenced to death as the Nazi death-camp guard "Ivan the Terrible." U.S. District Judge Thomas A. Wiseman on Friday set Oct. 15-16 as opening days of a hearing into whether government lawyers withheld evidence that might have cleared John Demjanjuk.
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WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
John Demjanjuk, a 91-year-old retired autoworker from Ohio, was found guilty of accessory to murder and sentenced to five years in prison by a German court Thursday for his part in the killings of about 28,000 Jews at a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. Judge Ralph Alt said he would allow Demjanjuk to be free pending an expected appeal. The defendant attended court in a wheelchair and the 18-month trial had been suspended several times because of his poor health. His lawyer, Ulrich Busch, was quoted by the Associated Press as saying his client was "just a scapegoat for the Germans; he has to pay for all the mistakes they made in the past and that's not justice.
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NEWS
June 6, 1992 | From Reuters
A federal appeals court on Friday reopened the case of John Demjanjuk, saying the U.S. government may have erred in ordering him extradited to Israel to face charges that he was a Nazi death camp guard. The 72-year-old former auto worker, identified by several survivors of the Treblinka death camp as a notorious guard nicknamed "Ivan the Terrible," has been sentenced to hang in Israel. Chief Judge Gilbert Merritt of the U.S.
NEWS
September 6, 1992 | Associated Press
A judge has ordered former U.S. government officials to answer allegations that they sent an innocent man to Israel, where he was sentenced to death as the Nazi death-camp guard "Ivan the Terrible." U.S. District Judge Thomas A. Wiseman on Friday set Oct. 15-16 as opening days of a hearing into whether government lawyers withheld evidence that might have cleared John Demjanjuk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1992
Sometime this summer Israel's five-member supreme court is expected to issue a momentous ruling in a case that has become a legal nightmare. At issue is whether a defendant sentenced to death for crimes against humanity committed during the Holocaust is really the man accused in the indictment. John--born Ivan--Demjanjuk, 72, a Ukrainian immigrant to the United States who was extradited to Israel to stand trial in 1986, claims he is a victim of mistaken identity.
WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
John Demjanjuk, a 91-year-old retired autoworker from Ohio, was found guilty of accessory to murder and sentenced to five years in prison by a German court Thursday for his part in the killings of about 28,000 Jews at a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. Judge Ralph Alt said he would allow Demjanjuk to be free pending an expected appeal. The defendant attended court in a wheelchair and the 18-month trial had been suspended several times because of his poor health. His lawyer, Ulrich Busch, was quoted by the Associated Press as saying his client was "just a scapegoat for the Germans; he has to pay for all the mistakes they made in the past and that's not justice.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lawyers for John Demjanjuk, the accused Nazi death camp guard appealing a death sentence in Israel, argued Monday that the U.S. Department of Justice withheld evidence that could have prevented Demjanjuk's 1986 extradition. In a 41-page brief filed at the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati, Demjanjuk's lawyers said the U.S.
NEWS
March 2, 1993 | Associated Press
John Demjanjuk, convicted in Israel as the brutal Nazi camp guard "Ivan the Terrible," began a three-day fast Monday to protest a delay in the ruling on his appeal, his lawyer said. A five-judge Supreme Court panel wound up the hearings on the 72-year-old Demjanjuk's appeal last June. "Nine months have passed, nothing has happened," attorney Yoram Sheftel said. "Any jury in the Western World would come to its conclusions within one hour. "My client is approaching 73.
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | SHARON LaFRANIERE, THE WASHINGTON POST
A federal appeals court in Cincinnati on Monday appointed a federal district judge from Tennessee as a special master to investigate whether the Justice Department engaged in prosecutorial misconduct in its Nazi war crimes case against John Demjanjuk.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Demjanjuk, convicted five years ago of murdering thousands of Jews at the Nazi death camp at Treblinka during World War II, could be set free today by the Israeli Supreme Court. Or, he could hear his original sentence of death by hanging confirmed as Treblinka's "Ivan the Terrible," the hated guard who packed Jews into the camp's gas chamber and delighted in tormenting them as he did.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1992
Sometime this summer Israel's five-member supreme court is expected to issue a momentous ruling in a case that has become a legal nightmare. At issue is whether a defendant sentenced to death for crimes against humanity committed during the Holocaust is really the man accused in the indictment. John--born Ivan--Demjanjuk, 72, a Ukrainian immigrant to the United States who was extradited to Israel to stand trial in 1986, claims he is a victim of mistaken identity.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | From Reuters
A federal appeals court on Friday reopened the case of John Demjanjuk, saying the U.S. government may have erred in ordering him extradited to Israel to face charges that he was a Nazi death camp guard. The 72-year-old former auto worker, identified by several survivors of the Treblinka death camp as a notorious guard nicknamed "Ivan the Terrible," has been sentenced to hang in Israel. Chief Judge Gilbert Merritt of the U.S.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The appeals hearing of convicted war criminal John Demjanjuk appeared to have been transformed into a whole new trial Wednesday when prosecutors presented evidence that he was a Nazi guard but not necessarily "Ivan the Terrible," the sadistic killer of the Treblinka death camp, as charged. The evidence was gleaned from German files and showed that Demjanjuk served as an SS guard at the Flossenberg concentration camp in Germany in 1943 and 1944.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the Israeli Supreme Court ruling freeing him of charges that he is "Ivan the Terrible," former Cleveland auto worker John Demjanjuk cannot return to the United States because he lied about his role as a death camp guard, Justice Department officials said Thursday. "The United States has taken the position that service at any death camp renders someone inadmissible to the United States.
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