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OPINION
July 29, 2008
Re "Free-market baby making," Opinion, July 24 Gregory Pence claims that the Vatican is "perverse" in condemning in-vitro fertilization (IVF). The Vatican -- and anyone with a heart -- knows a married couple that wishes to conceive a child and cannot suffers intensely. Nevertheless, no one has an absolute right to a child. The conceived child is the one who possesses rights, which IVF gravely tramples upon. IVF kills the innocent. It requires the creation up to a few dozen fertilized eggs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
December 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Triplets are out, singletons are in and twins are holding steady. So says a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine that examined birth trends in the United States from1971 to 2011. The authors of the report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other institutions, attribute the shift to professional guidelines urging fertility doctors to transfer only one or two embryos to their patients hoping to get pregnant. Those guidelines were first issued by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology in 1998, the same year that rates of triplet, quadruplets and even higher-order multiple births peaked in the U.S. Overall, the proportion of actual births that involved more than one baby rose from 1.8% in 1971 to 3.5% in 2011.
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NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization has been a controversial topic for many years because multiple births are linked to much higher rates of medical problems for both mothers and babies as well as huge healthcare costs. A study published Wednesday, one the largest analyses on the issue, concluded that doctors can consider transferring two embryos in some women but that there is no justification for transferring three or more embryos in any patient. Several countries have already enacted legislation to bar transfers of two or more embryos -- or more than one embryo among women who have a good chance of pregnancy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to the Los Angeles Times
About 10% of married couples suffer from infertility - the inability to conceive a child naturally. Through the better part of the 20th century, physicians considered this a minor and perhaps irrelevant problem, one that contributed overall to society by keeping the birthrate down. British biologist Robert Edwards thought differently. He was among the first to fully appreciate the frustration and depression the condition engendered in its victims and the benefits that could arise from reversing it. Along the way, he met resistance from religious conservatives who insisted that life must begin only through intercourse, not artificially, and from fellow scientists who resented the fact that he spoke frequently with the media about both his research and the ethical implications.
NEWS
September 23, 2010
Doctors and scientists are still learning about what effects in vitro fertilization may have on the health of children. But a new study of children's test scores provides evidence that IVF conception "does not have any detrimental effects on a child's intelligence or cognitive development," the author says. Researchers looked at the academic test scores of 423 Iowa children ages 8 to 17 who were conceived by IVF and at the test scores of 372 matched peers from the same schools. They also analyzed data on the parents of the IVF children, including ethnicity, education, age and marital status.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By Tami Dennis, Los Angeles Times
In vitro fertilization treatment can be emotionally grueling and prohibitively expensive, and some people decide they can't — they absolutely can't — go through it again. If only there was a way to accurately predict the chance that such treatments would lead to a real-life bundle of crying, needy, with-you-for-18-years-minimum joy. Stanford University researchers say they've done it, at least for women who've already had one round of IVF. In research published online Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they explain their model for predicting the odds that a live birth will result from IVF treatment.
SCIENCE
December 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Triplets are out, singletons are in and twins are holding steady. So says a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine that examined birth trends in the United States from1971 to 2011. The authors of the report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other institutions, attribute the shift to professional guidelines urging fertility doctors to transfer only one or two embryos to their patients hoping to get pregnant. Those guidelines were first issued by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology in 1998, the same year that rates of triplet, quadruplets and even higher-order multiple births peaked in the U.S. Overall, the proportion of actual births that involved more than one baby rose from 1.8% in 1971 to 3.5% in 2011.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
These days, most of Dr. Mark V. Sauer's patients are past their reproductive primes. In the past five years, about 200 women in their 40s and 50s have attempted to get pregnant via donor eggs at the USC-IVF Program. About 75% of those midlife patients are trying for their first child, Sauer says. He is straightforward about their chances. Infertile older women get pregnant at the same rates as infertile younger women.
NEWS
July 19, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
One of the early fears about in vitro fertilization at its inception more than 30 years ago was that the procedure might cause genetic or other health problems in children conceived in that manner. It's clear that IVF is very safe. However, several studies suggest a slightly higher risk of birth defects and some types of illness among children born via IFV that parents should be aware of. The latest study indicates cancer may occur more often. Previous studies looking for a link between cancer and IVF have found nothing.
NEWS
October 4, 2010
In 1978, Louise Brown was born -- and won the distinction of being the world's first "test tube baby" because she was conceived thanks to then-innovative in-vitro fertilization techniques, or IVF, developed by British biologists. Since then, IVF has more than grown up. The Los Angeles Times reports Monday that the technique and one of its pioneers are making headlines anew in "IVF innovator Robert G. Edwards wins Nobel. " Use of such techniques, also called assisted reproductive technology, has more than doubled in the last decade and accounts for 1% of all infants born in the United States each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Liam Neeson was a good sport for a national TV audience Monday afternoon, stripping down to snug pink underpants and gamely taking a soaking in the name of breast cancer research. Entering Ellen DeGeneres' stage to the strains of "Give It to Me Baby" while clad in a pink bathrobe, the "Taken 2" action star got his flirt on after DeGeneres explained to all that he'd be sitting in a dunk tank to earn $10,000 for the cause, helping kick off Breast Cancer Awareness Month. "If I take this off, does the $10,000 become $20,000?
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
For couples seeking to overcome infertility by turning to assisted reproductive technology - which can be invasive and expensive - an increased risk of birth defects probably won't stand in their way. Still, a study released Saturday by the New England Journal of Medicine may give some prospective parents a little something to think about as they mull their options for fertility treatment. The study is based on data from more than 300,000 births in the state of South Australia (population 1.6 million)
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The number of embryos transferred during in vitro fertilization has been a controversial topic for many years because multiple births are linked to much higher rates of medical problems for both mothers and babies as well as huge healthcare costs. A study published Wednesday, one the largest analyses on the issue, concluded that doctors can consider transferring two embryos in some women but that there is no justification for transferring three or more embryos in any patient. Several countries have already enacted legislation to bar transfers of two or more embryos -- or more than one embryo among women who have a good chance of pregnancy.
OPINION
November 10, 2011 | Meghan Daum
When I first heard about Personhood USA, I got it confused with Up with People, the organization best known for song-and-dance troupes that go around the world singing songs like "Which Way America?" and "What Color Is God's Skin?" When I realized it was actually an anti-abortion group devoted to the idea that any fertilized human egg should be considered a person, I still couldn't shake the image of wholesome young performers spreading fetus love across the globe. Instead of singing about peace and "dances through the ages" they could sing about zygotes and implantation, though admittedly those lyrics might be tough to rhyme.
NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Melissa Healy/Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Women who underwent at least one vitro fertilization cycle in an effort to become pregnant were almost twice as likely to develop ovarian cancer as women who experienced infertility but did not get such treatment, say the authors of a large Dutch study published this week. The study  is one of the largest conducted to date and tracked women for roughly 15 years after their first IVF cycle. Its findings appear to contradict those of an even larger Danish study published in 2009, which found no increase in cancer risk among women who had undergone infertility treatment.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Fertility scientists gathered in Stockholm last week to present their latest research on in vitro fertilization, high-risk pregnancies and other topics at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology conference. Among the highlights: British researchers have figured out a way to assess which pregnant women are at greatest risk of miscarriage. After studying 112 high-risk women during their sixth through 10th weeks of pregnancy, the researchers determined that the amount of a woman's bleeding and her level of the hormone chorionic gonadotrophin could be combined into a “pregnancy viability index” that accurately predicted which women would go on to continue their pregnancies in 94% of cases as well as which would have miscarriages in 77% of cases.
SCIENCE
October 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
British biologist Robert G. Edwards, whose contributions to the technology of in vitro fertilization have made more than 4 million couples parents, has been awarded the 2010 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. Working with Dr. Patrick Steptoe, Edwards, now 85, developed the techniques for removing mature eggs from a woman's ovaries, fertilizing them in test tubes and inducing them to begin dividing before implanting them back in the mother. Their efforts yielded the July 25, 1978, birth of Louise Brown, the first "test tube baby," both demonstrating the success and the safety of the technique and bringing hope to infertile people all over the world.
NEWS
January 27, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Maternal mortality is rare. But the rates are increasing in the United States and elsewhere for a number of reasons. In an editorial published Thursday, British researchers point out that in-vitro-fertilization-related pregnancies are an additional risk factor for maternal death. The major causes of death to new mothers are rare catastrophes, such as hemorrhage and blood clots. The incidence of these problems is increasing, possibly because more pregnant women today have health problems, such as diabetes, obesity or some other chronic condition.
NEWS
March 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
IVF treatment continues to be a popular choice for making babies. The treatment, known formally as in vitro fertilization, is successful in producing a live birth in 41.4% of treatment cycles for women under age 35, according to information released Monday by the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology. Data for 2009, the most recent year analyzed, showed the rate of live births per cycle with fresh embryos did not change much from 2008 when it was 41.3% for women under 35. However, that's still an improvement from 2003 when the rate of live births per cycle was 37.5% in that age group.
NEWS
January 27, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Maternal mortality is rare. But the rates are increasing in the United States and elsewhere for a number of reasons. In an editorial published Thursday, British researchers point out that in-vitro-fertilization-related pregnancies are an additional risk factor for maternal death. The major causes of death to new mothers are rare catastrophes, such as hemorrhage and blood clots. The incidence of these problems is increasing, possibly because more pregnant women today have health problems, such as diabetes, obesity or some other chronic condition.
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