Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsIvins
IN THE NEWS

Ivins

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
January 28, 2002
Regarding the distinction between unlawful combatants and POWs at Guantanamo Bay ("Captives Not POWs, U.S. Contends," Jan. 23): I agree with Amnesty International and the Red Cross that the prisoners taken from Afghanistan should be called POWs and be given the rights accorded to such. They were members of the Taliban army captured during a war defending themselves from the U.S. and Northern Alliance armies. The Pentagon's excuse that they are disqualified from being called POWs because of their lack of a uniform or insignia is ridiculous.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2012
THEATER Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins Tony and Oscar nominee Kathleen Turner stars as the brassy Texas reporter whose liberal journalism and political criticism skyrocketed her to the national stage. The solo show, penned by twins and seasoned reporters Margaret and Allison Engel, makes its West Coast debut. Geffen Playhouse, 10886 Le Conte Ave., L.A. Show opens Tuesday. Runs through Feb. 12. 8 p.m. Tuesday to Friday, 3 and 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1998
Considering the fervor with which Molly Ivins wrote against Newt Gingrich (Commentary, Nov. 11), it would have meant more if she had mentioned how Bill Clinton was also a finger-pointer and how the Democrats threw all morality aside and came to his rescue. She really stretches the truth when she accuses Gingrich of being a spinmeister, without mentioning how Clinton was the master of the spin. If anyone stretches the truth it is Clinton and his cronies, especially James Carville. It amazes me that none of the liberal set can find fault with their messenger, Clinton.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2011 | By David Willman, Washington Bureau
FBI Agent Edward Montooth began worrying the moment he got the call early on the morning of July 27, 2008: The chief suspect in the deadly anthrax letter attacks of 2001 had just been rushed to a hospital. The leader of the FBI investigation knew that if Army microbiologist Bruce E. Ivins died, the opportunity to present the case against him in a courtroom would be lost. Conspiracy theories and speculation, he feared, could well overshadow the evidence. "They better save [him]
OPINION
August 17, 2008
Re "Clashing portraits of anthrax suspect," Aug. 10 The Times has published a number of articles sensationalizing the case of Bruce Ivins. In all of these, only one factual piece of information pointing to Ivins as the culprit -- DNA comparisons of the criminal anthrax from the envelopes with that from Ivins' lab -- was presented. The rest was innuendo. We all should be aware that Ivins has not been proved guilty, and whether he was innocent or guilty, the FBI, which had a political motivation to find a culprit regardless of the evidence, hounded him to his suicide.
OPINION
February 10, 2007
Re "Molly Ivins: She was 'a truth-seeking missile'," Current, Feb. 4 What is the purpose of The Times carrying Kinky Friedman's tribute to Molly Ivins? Is it to apologize for not having carried her columns all these years, or is it to tease its readers by demonstrating what they have missed? I take it The Times will print a similar tribute about political cartoonist Paul Conrad when that sad day comes. Only in that instance, The Times' failure will be worse, as Conrad was instrumental in lifting The Times from a mediocre regional paper into a force to be reckoned with.
OPINION
February 2, 2007
Re "Molly Ivins, 62; humorist who targeted her wit at the powerful," obituary, Feb. 1 Molly Ivins is gone, and my world is a little dimmer. During the times when I have truly believed that our democracy was doomed and Americans were dissolving into a Rush Limbaugh-led mob of know-nothings, her clear-eyed humor and sense of the ridiculous restored my balance and understanding that there is intelligent life out there, and that with care and effort it...
NATIONAL
August 3, 2008 | From the Associated Press
. -- Bruce E. Ivins, the late microbiologist suspected in the 2001 anthrax attacks, had attempted to poison people and his therapist said she was "scared to death" of him, according to court testimony that emerged Saturday. Social worker Jean Duley testified at a court hearing in Frederick on July 24 in a successful bid for a protective order against Ivins -- who died five days later in an apparent suicide -- that he "actually attempted to murder several other people."
OPINION
February 4, 2007 | Kinky Friedman, KINKY FRIEDMAN is an author, musician and former candidate for governor of Texas.
Atrue maverick died in Texas last week, and they don't make 'em extra. There'll always be plenty of George Bushes and John Kerrys to go around; the Crips and the Bloods will trot them out every four years whether we like it or not. But a voice in the wilderness, like the still, small voice within, is a song to be savored while we have it, whether we're listening or not, and when we have lost it, we should mourn for ourselves. Such a voice was that of Molly Ivins.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
Evidence linking the anthrax that killed five people in 2001 to a flask of spores in the laboratory of federal microbiologist Bruce E. Ivins was not as definitive as the FBI claimed, a panel of researchers said Tuesday . Although the panel assembled by the National Academy of Sciences did not dispute that Ivins was the perpetrator of the terrorist act, it faulted the FBI's conclusions that the perpetrator must have had a high level of...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Mirage Man: Bruce Ivins, the Anthrax Attacks, and America's Rush to War David Willman Bantam: 449 pp., $27 The anthrax-laced letters that killed five people in the fall of 2001, shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks, heightened America's sense of being a nation under siege. The Bush administration used the letters as support for the invasion of Iraq, seizing on dubious evidence that the anthrax in them had been "weaponized" as proof that Saddam Hussein's regime was involved.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2011 | By David Willman, Los Angeles Times
He roamed the University of Cincinnati campus with a loaded gun. When his rage overflowed, the brainy microbiology major would open fire inside empty buildings, visualizing a wall clock or other object as a person who had done him wrong. By the mid-1970s, Bruce Ivins had earned his doctorate and was a promising researcher at the University of North Carolina. By outward appearances, he was a charming eccentric, odd but disarming. Inside, he still smoldered with resentment, and he saw a new outlet for it. Several years earlier, a Cincinnati student had turned him down for a date.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2011 | By David Willman, Special to The Times
The Army scientist believed responsible for the 2001 anthrax letter attacks that killed five people and crippled mail delivery in parts of the country had exhibited alarming mental problems that military officials should have noticed and acted on long before he had a chance to strike, a panel of behavioral analysts has found. The anthrax attacks, the nation's worst bioterrorism event, "could have been anticipated ? and prevented," the panel said. The analysts also concluded that confidential records documenting Bruce E. Ivins' psychiatric history offered "considerable additional circumstantial evidence" that he was indeed the anthrax killer.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
Evidence linking the anthrax that killed five people in 2001 to a flask of spores in the laboratory of federal microbiologist Bruce E. Ivins was not as definitive as the FBI claimed, a panel of researchers said Tuesday . Although the panel assembled by the National Academy of Sciences did not dispute that Ivins was the perpetrator of the terrorist act, it faulted the FBI's conclusions that the perpetrator must have had a high level of...
NATIONAL
February 20, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano
The FBI and Justice Department on Friday officially closed their investigation into the 2001 mailings of anthrax-contaminated letters to Capitol Hill and journalists in New York and Florida, concluding that U.S. Army medical researcher Bruce E. Ivins was solely responsible for the five deaths that resulted. Had Ivins not died in an apparent suicide in July 2008 as investigators were closing in on him, he would probably have been charged with the use of a weapon of mass destruction, authorities said in their report.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2009 | Claudia Feldman
My editor flipped through the new book about iconic Texas journalist Molly Ivins that I'd carried to him like a dog with a bone. Before her death in 2007, I was a huge Ivins fan. "Does anybody still care?" he asked. "And what could possibly be new?" Pretty soon I was posing those same questions to Austin author Bill Minutaglio, who along with W. Michael Smith wrote "Molly Ivins: A Rebel Life." "Of course I'm heavily biased," Minutaglio said, "but Molly's millions of fans do still care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2007 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Molly Ivins, the irrepressibly irreverent political humorist and syndicated columnist who skewered legislators, governors and presidents, especially those from her beloved Texas, died Wednesday at her home in Austin after a long battle with cancer. She was 62. Ivins was diagnosed in 1999 with a rare and aggressive form of breast cancer. After fighting two recurrences, she became ill again last year as the disease spread throughout her body.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Calling it "a most urgent public health and national security issue," two ranking lawmakers said Friday that they were expanding their congressional investigation into the risks associated with the nation's biodefense labs to focus on how someone as mentally unstable as accused anthrax killer Bruce E. Ivins could have worked unsupervised with deadly biological agents for so long. Reps. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, and Bart Stupak (D-Mich.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2009 | associated press
Anthrax mailing suspect Bruce Ivins tormented his wife with rudeness and behaved erratically in the weeks before the Army scientist took his own life by overdosing on Tylenol, according to documents released Monday. The records from the Frederick Police Department also reveal that Ivins acknowledged to a nurse that his overdose was intentional.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2008 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
On Sept. 7, 2007, as investigators were building the case against him for the deadly anthrax mailings, Army scientist Bruce E. Ivins sent himself an excited e-mail titled, "Finally! I know Who mailed the anthrax!" The e-mail -- along with other correspondence showing that Ivins more recently mused about how to blind or kill a reality TV participant -- was among previously confidential investigative documents unsealed on Wednesday by a federal judge.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|