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Ivory

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1998
A suggestion to the appellate judges that interpreted the law to read that mentally ill inmates should be released to the community (Sept. 3): Have the inmates live in the judges' ivory towers, and then see if perhaps the judges will have second thoughts. NANCY THOMPSON Irvine
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1988 | SY MONTGOMERY, Montgomery is a freelance writer based in Boston
A new census of elephants in East Africa reveals that the elephant population in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda has dropped by 87% or more in the last 15 years, and the report predicts that the animal will become extinct in those countries within 10 years if poaching practices persist. The census further says this unprecedented "population crash" includes many national parks and game reserves in those countries. It also suggests that the situation may be equally grim for elephants throughout Africa.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | From Times wire service s
Brigitte Bardot, whose breakaway towels kept eyes glued to the screen in her cinema "sex-kitten" days, made her television debut today to save the elephant by putting ivory dealers out of business. After 16 years of avoiding cameras, the 54-year-old Bardot's passion for animal welfare finally persuaded her to host a series of six hard-hitting documentaries aimed at halting reckless poaching for profit and cruelty in the name of science. "There were 2.5 million elephants in 1960.
MAGAZINE
October 5, 1986
If we follow the logic set out on sea urchins by Gary Karasik in "A Prickly Question" (Aug. 17), it thus would be perfectly all right to slaughter elephants for their ivory and rhinoceroses for their horns. This is one of the best examples of the overinflated and chauvinistic human male ego: Only those that respond directly to his own needs could be regarded as worthy of his approval and, presumably, admiration. Kathleen Sweet Pasadena
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | MICHAEL SEILER, Times Staff Writer
The director of the Los Angeles City Zoo was fired today for his inability to solve what his boss called "a series of internal problems" at the Griffith Park facility, City Hall officials announced. Dr. Warren Thomas, director of the zoo since 1974, was dismissed this morning from the $73,000-a-year post after a disciplinary hearing Tuesday, said James E. Hadaway, general manager of the city's Recreation and Parks Department.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1989
The critics quoted in Weinstein's article are just a bunch of stuffed shirts! What's wrong with a bad joke, a smart-aleck remark or video of the latest pig races after an hour of murder and mayhem on the local news? Dan Gingold, USC assistant professor of journalism, should climb out of his ivory tower and stop taking the news so seriously! If a local newsperson laughs at a joke made by the sports or weather person, it doesn't mean that I will never again trust the news anchor to tell me about a fire, murder or other event.
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