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Iyad Allawi

WORLD
June 21, 2010 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Former Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, who is vying to once again lead his nation, on Sunday accused unnamed figures in the current government of being involved in a plot to kill him. Allawi, whose Iraqiya bloc won the largest share of parliamentary seats in March elections that have still not produced a new government, did not name the alleged culprits but provided an April 29 letter from the U.S. military to back up his contention that his...
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WORLD
June 15, 2010 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Iraq's new parliament held its first session Monday three months after inconclusive national elections. The brief ceremonial gathering convened even as a political deadlock threatened to delay the formation of the next government until August, if not later. Lawmakers, dressed in Western suits, tribal robes and clerics' turbans, filed into the hall for a 19-minute session in which they took their formal oath. Two men, both seated in the parliament's first row, loomed over the session: Prime Minister Nouri Maliki and Iyad Allawi, the former prime minister whose coalition won a narrow plurality in the new assembly.
WORLD
May 20, 2010 | Borzou Daragahi
When American tanks tore through her neighborhood, ripping up the roads as they uprooted a nation, she stayed put, refusing to move abroad like many of her wealthy friends. When the black-clad gunmen took over her religiously mixed west Baghdad neighborhood, turning it into a killing field, she wouldn't let them drive her out of the country she loved. And even when they killed her husband, gunning him down as he left work, she fought through her grief, staying in Iraq and hoping for better times.
WORLD
May 18, 2010 | By Liz Sly, Los Angeles Times
An Iraqi court on Monday upheld the appeals of nine winning parliamentary candidates who were barred from office because of their alleged ties to the former Baath Party. The decision permits them to take up their seats and removes the last obstacle to the final certification of March's inconclusive election results. The decision came after a recount in Baghdad did not uncover any fraud, and appears to spell the end of a series of challenges to the result by Shiite parties aiming to overturn the narrow lead of the Sunni-backed former Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, whose faction won 91 seats in the parliament to 89 for that of incumbent Prime Minister Nouri Maliki.
WORLD
May 15, 2010 | By Liz Sly and Raheem Salman, Los Angeles Times
In an embarrassing rejection of Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's efforts to overturn his rival's lead in Iraq's inconclusive parliamentary election, a laborious manual recount of votes in Baghdad has turned up no evidence of electoral fraud and will not change the final outcome, officials said Friday. The recount was ordered nearly a month ago after Maliki's Shiite-dominated electoral slate alleged that as many as 750,000 ballots had been manipulated, with the worst violations occurring in Baghdad.
WORLD
May 1, 2010 | By Caesar Ahmed and Borzou Daragahi
Iraq's prime minister dismissed his rival's call for international help to resolve the country's postelection political crisis as the dispute threatens to inflame rifts and undermine American plans for withdrawal. In a televised speech Friday, Prime Minister Nouri Maliki, whose political bloc finished a close second behind former premier Iyad Allawi's slate in the March 7 elections, alleged that "regional, international" players were attempting a coup d'etat against his government.
WORLD
April 28, 2010 | Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Former Iraqi Prime Minister Iyad Allawi demanded that an internationally backed caretaker government be formed and new national elections be held, if an Iraqi court continues to bar parliamentary candidates from his slate from taking office. The comments by Allawi, whose slate won more parliament seats than any other political list in the March elections, underscored a deepening conviction within his coalition that Prime Minister Nouri Maliki's Shiite Muslim-dominated alliance is trying to erode his slate's lead by any means possible.
WORLD
April 18, 2010 | By Ned Parker
Prime Minister Nouri Maliki, in his first interview with a Western media outlet since last month's bitterly fought elections, vowed Saturday that Iraq's Sunni Arabs would be major players in the next government, as he cast himself both as peacemaker and front-runner to lead the country. The Shiite prime minister, who appeared confident and jovial during an hourlong interview at his palace office, also invited a secular bloc led by rival Iyad Allawi to join him in governing, despite an acrimonious postelection period that saw Maliki's supporters label the Iraqiya slate a front for the late Saddam Hussein's Baath Party.
WORLD
April 6, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Raheem Salman
Bombs gutted a market and destroyed at least four buildings in working-class Shiite Muslim areas of Baghdad on Tuesday, killing dozens as violence following last month's election continued to escalate and raise fears among Iraqis that a new civil war could erupt. In some of the cases, unknown men had rented rooms in buildings around the city, wired them with explosives and detonated their devices on Tuesday morning. Security sources said that the first explosions took place shortly before 9 a.m. in the adjoining Shiite districts of Shoula and Shukuk; within the next two hours, a building, home to a restaurant and children's arcade, was dynamited in the western neighborhood of Allawi; and a car bomb exploded and another building was destroyed elsewhere western Baghdad.
WORLD
April 2, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed
Men crowded small metal tables in outdoor tents and checked off their choice for prime minister. Among the options were the incumbent, Nouri Maliki, and his main rival, Iyad Allawi. Iraq held parliamentary elections less than a month ago. But the unofficial balloting held across the country Friday was less about who will rule the country than a demonstration of the staying power of Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada Sadr's populist movement. Backers of Sadr, who organized the vote, said they hoped it would allow ordinary Iraqis to have a say as Maliki, Allawi and other political figures bargain over the formation of the next government.
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