Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJ Bennett Johnston
IN THE NEWS

J Bennett Johnston

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Louisiana voters go to the polls Saturday in a turbulent Senate primary that both parties here view as a political watershed for the state, and perhaps the nation. At stake is far more than the reelection of Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston. With Republican State Rep.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.), one of the Senate's premier deal-makers who wielded enormous influence on energy and environmental issues, announced his intention to retire, after 22 years in Congress, when his term expires in two years. "There are rhythms and tides and seasons in life," Johnston, 62, said. "And now I believe that the season for a new beginning approaches." Louisiana political analysts were not surprised.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 10, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.), one of the Senate's premier deal-makers who wielded enormous influence on energy and environmental issues, announced his intention to retire, after 22 years in Congress, when his term expires in two years. "There are rhythms and tides and seasons in life," Johnston, 62, said. "And now I believe that the season for a new beginning approaches." Louisiana political analysts were not surprised.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's an old joke that Henson Moore, the deputy secretary of energy, likes to tell when asked how the Administration is faring in the accelerating congressional debate over a new national energy strategy. "A guy (i.e., the Bush Administration) jumps off the Empire State Building," Moore says. "As he's falling past the 25th floor, someone leans out the window and asks how it's going. 'So far, so good,' he replies." Working closely with the Administration, Senate Energy Committee Chairman J.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke predicted that the withdrawal of the Republican Party's U.S. Senate candidate would help Duke defeat incumbent Democrat J. Bennett Johnston. Both Johnston and Duke predicted an outright win in today's open primary. State Sen. Ben Bagert, the party-sanctioned Republican, withdrew Thursday. He said his polls indicated he could draw just enough votes from Johnston to force the Democrat into a Nov. 6 runoff against Duke, who is campaigning as a Republican.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Louisiana Republicans on Saturday endorsed a New Orleans state senator to challenge incumbent U.S. Sen. J. Bennett Johnston, decisively rejecting a bid by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, who is now a state representative. Delegates at the statewide convention picked state Sen. Ben Bagert over Secretary of State Fox McKeithen, state Rep. Quentin Dastugue of Metairie and Duke, also of Metairie. Bagert garnered 451 votes.
NEWS
November 11, 1986 | Associated Press
Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.) announced today that he has abandoned his challenge to Sen. Robert C. Byrd for the job of majority leader in the 100th Congress, leaving Byrd unopposed for the post. "I do not believe I have the votes," Johnston told reporters in giving up his attempt to replace Byrd, of West Virginia, who has led the Democrats in the Senate for nearly a decade.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For incumbents, this continues to be the year of living dangerously. On Saturday in Louisiana, three-term Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston narrowly escaped a stunning challenge from state Rep. David Duke--an improbable opponent, whose political baggage included service as the grand wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, ties to neo-Nazi and other anti-Semitic groups, fabrication of a war record in Vietnam and embarrassing disclosures that he had once authored a sex manual for women.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
In a warning of the partisan warfare that lies ahead, leading congressional Democrats on Sunday urged President-elect George Bush to convene an economic summit on slashing the nation's budget deficit, and to put "everything on the table," including proposals for new taxes. Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an election seen across the nation as a test of race relations, Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston narrowly won reelection Saturday, turning aside a surprisingly stubborn challenge from state Rep. David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. But Duke refused to concede defeat Saturday night, and his powerful showing immediately sparked predictions that he would bid for another high office as soon as next year.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For incumbents, this continues to be the year of living dangerously. On Saturday in Louisiana, three-term Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston narrowly escaped a stunning challenge from state Rep. David Duke--an improbable opponent, whose political baggage included service as the grand wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, ties to neo-Nazi and other anti-Semitic groups, fabrication of a war record in Vietnam and embarrassing disclosures that he had once authored a sex manual for women.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In an election seen across the nation as a test of race relations, Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston narrowly won reelection Saturday, turning aside a surprisingly stubborn challenge from state Rep. David Duke, a former grand wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. But Duke refused to concede defeat Saturday night, and his powerful showing immediately sparked predictions that he would bid for another high office as soon as next year.
NEWS
October 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke predicted that the withdrawal of the Republican Party's U.S. Senate candidate would help Duke defeat incumbent Democrat J. Bennett Johnston. Both Johnston and Duke predicted an outright win in today's open primary. State Sen. Ben Bagert, the party-sanctioned Republican, withdrew Thursday. He said his polls indicated he could draw just enough votes from Johnston to force the Democrat into a Nov. 6 runoff against Duke, who is campaigning as a Republican.
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Louisiana voters go to the polls Saturday in a turbulent Senate primary that both parties here view as a political watershed for the state, and perhaps the nation. At stake is far more than the reelection of Democratic Sen. J. Bennett Johnston. With Republican State Rep.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 18 years, U.S. Sen. J. Bennett Johnston has kept a low profile. So low, in fact, that one poll earlier this year showed that the three-term Democratic incumbent was unknown by almost a majority of Louisiana voters. But, as he runs for reelection in an open primary on Oct. 6, Johnston has become a household word--largely because his principal opponent is state Rep. David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard with connections to the American Nazi Party.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Louisiana Republicans on Saturday endorsed a New Orleans state senator to challenge incumbent U.S. Sen. J. Bennett Johnston, decisively rejecting a bid by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, who is now a state representative. Delegates at the statewide convention picked state Sen. Ben Bagert over Secretary of State Fox McKeithen, state Rep. Quentin Dastugue of Metairie and Duke, also of Metairie. Bagert garnered 451 votes.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 18 years, U.S. Sen. J. Bennett Johnston has kept a low profile. So low, in fact, that one poll earlier this year showed that the three-term Democratic incumbent was unknown by almost a majority of Louisiana voters. But, as he runs for reelection in an open primary on Oct. 6, Johnston has become a household word--largely because his principal opponent is state Rep. David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard with connections to the American Nazi Party.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's an old joke that Henson Moore, the deputy secretary of energy, likes to tell when asked how the Administration is faring in the accelerating congressional debate over a new national energy strategy. "A guy (i.e., the Bush Administration) jumps off the Empire State Building," Moore says. "As he's falling past the 25th floor, someone leans out the window and asks how it's going. 'So far, so good,' he replies." Working closely with the Administration, Senate Energy Committee Chairman J.
NEWS
November 29, 1988 | SARA FRITZ and WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writers
In the wake of what for them was a very disappointing presidential election, Senate Democrats will have a rare opportunity to reshape their party's image today when they choose a new majority leader to replace Robert C. Byrd (D-W.Va.), who is stepping down. The new leader will be chosen by secret ballot at a private meeting of the 55 Democrats--including eight freshmen--who will serve in the 101st Congress, which convenes next January. The three contenders for the job are Sens. George J.
NEWS
November 14, 1988 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
In a warning of the partisan warfare that lies ahead, leading congressional Democrats on Sunday urged President-elect George Bush to convene an economic summit on slashing the nation's budget deficit, and to put "everything on the table," including proposals for new taxes. Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|