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J Bruce Llewellyn

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BUSINESS
January 10, 1989 | Associated Press
The New York Times Co. said Monday that it has agreed to sell its cable television system for $420 million to a venture that will be managed by a minority investment group. The price amounts to nearly $2,600 per subscriber, which industry analysts said made it one of the more expensive cable system sales to date. Because the sale was to a minority-managed venture, the deal may also qualify for tax advantages that would boost its effective value to the Times.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2010
Nancy Stoner Sage 1906 San Francisco quake survivor Nancy Stoner Sage, 105, one of the few remaining survivors of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, died Thursday, three days before the 104th anniversary of the temblor. She died of natural causes at a Colorado nursing home, her son told the Oakland Tribune. Born in 1905, she was 15 months old when the quake struck on April 18, 1906. Her family lost everything in the resulting fire and her mother died soon after. Sent to Idaho to be raised by her grandfather and his wife, she grew up to become a librarian in a small farming town in the state.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2010
Nancy Stoner Sage 1906 San Francisco quake survivor Nancy Stoner Sage, 105, one of the few remaining survivors of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, died Thursday, three days before the 104th anniversary of the temblor. She died of natural causes at a Colorado nursing home, her son told the Oakland Tribune. Born in 1905, she was 15 months old when the quake struck on April 18, 1906. Her family lost everything in the resulting fire and her mother died soon after. Sent to Idaho to be raised by her grandfather and his wife, she grew up to become a librarian in a small farming town in the state.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1989 | Associated Press
The New York Times Co. said Monday that it has agreed to sell its cable television system for $420 million to a venture that will be managed by a minority investment group. The price amounts to nearly $2,600 per subscriber, which industry analysts said made it one of the more expensive cable system sales to date. Because the sale was to a minority-managed venture, the deal may also qualify for tax advantages that would boost its effective value to the Times.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1989
Beer-maker Adolph Coors Co. of Golden, Colo., increased its board to eight members from five by adding nuclear engineer Richard Philip Godwin, attorney J. Bruce Llewellyn and investment banker John H. Mullin III. The other five members are all members of the Coors family.
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | From Times wire services
The New York Times Co. has agreed to sell its cable television system for $420 million in cash to an investment group that will include at least 20% minority ownership, it was announced today. J. Bruce Llewellyn, a Philadelphia soft-drink bottling executive who is one of the nation's top black business executives, will head the minority investment partnership. The other investors are a pair of cable-TV companies based in the Philadelphia area, Comcast Corp. and Lenfest Communications Inc.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1985 | Associated Press
A New York lawyer-businessman joined basketball star Julius (Dr. J) Erving in taking over majority ownership Wednesday of the first black-controlled Coca-Cola bottling franchise in what was described as a multimillion-dollar deal. J. Bruce Llewellyn, who has served as chairman of the Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Co., will become chief executive of the firm, which today does an annual gross business of more than $100 million. Coca-Cola U.S.A.
SPORTS
July 25, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
J. Bruce Llewellyn, the chairman and chief executive officer of the Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Co., says he is interested in buying the New York Yankees if George Steinbrenner is forced to sell the team, New York Newsday reported today. Llewellyn has previously tried to buy the Seattle Mariners and the Baltimore Orioles. If successful in purchasing the Yankees, he would become the first black owner of a major league baseball club. Philadelphia Coca-Cola Bottling Co.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1989 | Associated Press
The New York Times Co. has agreed to sell its cable television system for $420 million in cash to an investment group that will include at least 20% minority ownership, it was announced today. J. Bruce Llewellyn, a Philadelphia soft-drink bottling executive who is one of the nation's top black business executives, will head the minority investment partnership.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Louisiana State University admits violating some NCAA rules when it recruited basketball player Lester Earl but denies former assistant coach Johnny Jones gave him more than $6,000. The university also denies that Jones, now an assistant at Memphis, arranged for an LSU booster to pay Earl another $4,000.
NEWS
November 2, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As potential rivals begin to size up Colin L. Powell's possible vulnerabilities as a presidential candidate, an item topping their lists is the general's investment a decade ago in a Buffalo, N.Y., television station. Powell's possible adversaries do not suggest any impropriety on his part.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A little-known investment firm founded just four years ago is suddenly poised to become far-and-away the nation's largest black-owned business with plans to purchase a controlling interest in Beatrice Cos.' international foods division. The firm, TLC Group LP of New York, along with the New York investment banking firm of Drexel Burnham Lambert, announced plans Sunday to buy the Beatrice division for $985 million.
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