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J C Watts

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NEWS
November 19, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's young--only 41--and a former University of Oklahoma football star. He's charismatic--an articulate and, some say, even inspirational speaker. He's a conservative Republican. Incidentally, he's also black. That's how Rep. J. C. Watts Jr. (R-Okla.) would describe what he brings to the House GOP's fourth-ranking leadership post after his election Wednesday as chairman of the House Republican Conference, the group that maps legislative strategy for the GOP.
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OPINION
July 12, 2002
Earl Ofari Hutchinson's July 8 commentary, "A Black Republican Wises Up and Opts Out," was quite astounding. Apparently, when Rep. J.C. Watts Jr. of Oklahoma says, "I want to spend more time with my family," Hutchinson hears, "I've seen the light; where do I get my passes to the next Al Gore fund-raiser?" Hutchinson further claims that most black Democrats are opposed to school vouchers, which is highly debatable. After all, those at the grass-roots forefront of the voucher movement are inner-city blacks, not exactly the Republican base.
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NEWS
February 5, 1997 | SAM FULWOOD III and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Arguing that the state of the union resides far from the nation's capital, Rep. J.C. Watts (R-Okla.) responded to President Clinton's speech Tuesday with a call for federal lawmakers to grant average Americans a larger role in public life. "The strength of America is not in Washington," Watts said during his 20-minute speech delivered shortly after Clinton's State of the Union address. "The strength of America is at home, in lives well-lived in the land of faith and family."
SPORTS
August 15, 2000 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
No. 1 STEVE YOUNG * Party: Republican. * Bio: Former Super Bowl MVP quarterback with the San Francisco 49ers. * Strengths: Agile mind, quick on his feet, has law degree--could be the poster boy for "compassionate conservatism." * Political potholes: Young's favorite recording artist is Bruce Springsteen, whose common-man songs have a Democratic bent. Also: Young is a lefty. * Most dangerous opponent: Joe Montana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1999
Once again a column full of generalizations has caught my attention. The Jan. 4 column by David Bradley on Rep. J.C. Watts (R-Okla.) was very puzzling to me. I remember following Watts' career at Oklahoma as a teenager and feel he is a man who is led by his convictions, and I applaud him for that. What provoked me was Bradley's statements, especially, "He is an intelligent, telegenic and articulate black man, whose beliefs, although unpopular with many blacks, are shared by many--perhaps a majority--of Americans."
OPINION
July 12, 2002
Earl Ofari Hutchinson's July 8 commentary, "A Black Republican Wises Up and Opts Out," was quite astounding. Apparently, when Rep. J.C. Watts Jr. of Oklahoma says, "I want to spend more time with my family," Hutchinson hears, "I've seen the light; where do I get my passes to the next Al Gore fund-raiser?" Hutchinson further claims that most black Democrats are opposed to school vouchers, which is highly debatable. After all, those at the grass-roots forefront of the voucher movement are inner-city blacks, not exactly the Republican base.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1999 | DAVID BRADLEY, David Bradley, a freelance writer, is the author of the 1981 novel "The Chaneysville Incident" and of the forthcoming "The Bondage Hypothesis: Meditations on Race, History and America" (Viking/Penguin)
When the 106th Congress convenes Wednesday, the Republican leadership will reflect an historically significant choice. In November, House Republicans eleccted a black American, Oklahoma Rep. Julius Caesar Watts Jr., to the post of conference chairman, the No. 4 position in their hierarchy. While not the highest position ever held by a black--Democrat William Gray was House majority whip--it will be the highest ever held by a black Republican.
SPORTS
August 15, 2000 | CHRIS DUFRESNE
No. 1 STEVE YOUNG * Party: Republican. * Bio: Former Super Bowl MVP quarterback with the San Francisco 49ers. * Strengths: Agile mind, quick on his feet, has law degree--could be the poster boy for "compassionate conservatism." * Political potholes: Young's favorite recording artist is Bruce Springsteen, whose common-man songs have a Democratic bent. Also: Young is a lefty. * Most dangerous opponent: Joe Montana.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republicans have long been pleased to count J.C. Watts as one of their own. A star college quarterback at the University of Oklahoma, he led the Sooners to national fame in the late 1970s, earning "most valuable player" honors in the Orange Bowl two years in a row. Turning to politics, Watts at age 33 became the first black elected to statewide office in Oklahoma by winning a seat in 1990 on the state's corporation commission, which regulates energy firms.
NEWS
November 19, 1998 | JANET HOOK and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Republicans, in a dramatic but smooth transfer of power, Wednesday nominated Rep. Bob Livingston of Louisiana to be the next speaker, catapulted their sole black member--J. C. Watts Jr. of Oklahoma--into the upper ranks of leadership and sacked the head of their much-criticized campaign committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1999
Once again a column full of generalizations has caught my attention. The Jan. 4 column by David Bradley on Rep. J.C. Watts (R-Okla.) was very puzzling to me. I remember following Watts' career at Oklahoma as a teenager and feel he is a man who is led by his convictions, and I applaud him for that. What provoked me was Bradley's statements, especially, "He is an intelligent, telegenic and articulate black man, whose beliefs, although unpopular with many blacks, are shared by many--perhaps a majority--of Americans."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1999 | DAVID BRADLEY, David Bradley, a freelance writer, is the author of the 1981 novel "The Chaneysville Incident" and of the forthcoming "The Bondage Hypothesis: Meditations on Race, History and America" (Viking/Penguin)
When the 106th Congress convenes Wednesday, the Republican leadership will reflect an historically significant choice. In November, House Republicans eleccted a black American, Oklahoma Rep. Julius Caesar Watts Jr., to the post of conference chairman, the No. 4 position in their hierarchy. While not the highest position ever held by a black--Democrat William Gray was House majority whip--it will be the highest ever held by a black Republican.
NEWS
November 19, 1998 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's young--only 41--and a former University of Oklahoma football star. He's charismatic--an articulate and, some say, even inspirational speaker. He's a conservative Republican. Incidentally, he's also black. That's how Rep. J. C. Watts Jr. (R-Okla.) would describe what he brings to the House GOP's fourth-ranking leadership post after his election Wednesday as chairman of the House Republican Conference, the group that maps legislative strategy for the GOP.
NEWS
November 19, 1998 | JANET HOOK and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Republicans, in a dramatic but smooth transfer of power, Wednesday nominated Rep. Bob Livingston of Louisiana to be the next speaker, catapulted their sole black member--J. C. Watts Jr. of Oklahoma--into the upper ranks of leadership and sacked the head of their much-criticized campaign committee.
NEWS
November 4, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republicans have long been pleased to count J.C. Watts as one of their own. A star college quarterback at the University of Oklahoma, he led the Sooners to national fame in the late 1970s, earning "most valuable player" honors in the Orange Bowl two years in a row. Turning to politics, Watts at age 33 became the first black elected to statewide office in Oklahoma by winning a seat in 1990 on the state's corporation commission, which regulates energy firms.
NEWS
February 5, 1997 | SAM FULWOOD III and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Arguing that the state of the union resides far from the nation's capital, Rep. J.C. Watts (R-Okla.) responded to President Clinton's speech Tuesday with a call for federal lawmakers to grant average Americans a larger role in public life. "The strength of America is not in Washington," Watts said during his 20-minute speech delivered shortly after Clinton's State of the Union address. "The strength of America is at home, in lives well-lived in the land of faith and family."
SPORTS
August 13, 2002
"The stupidity kicked in.... This pulled hamstring reminds me why I got out in 1986." Rep. J.C. Watts, Former Oklahoma and CFL quarterback who ran sprints Monday as a guest at the Washington Redskin training camp.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Clinton urged Americans to convert the charity shown at Thanksgiving into a year-round community effort to move millions of people off the welfare rolls. "We must not pack our compassion back in the cupboard like fine china that gets used once a year," Clinton said in his weekly radio address. He spoke from the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland's Catoctin Mountains. In the Republican response, Rep. J. C. Watts Jr. (R-Okla.
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