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J Carter Brown

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NEWS
January 25, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
J. Carter Brown has resigned after 22 years as director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington. In a letter released Friday, Brown, 57, said it is time for the gallery to have "fresh leadership" and that it has become difficult to divide his time fairly among his work with various organizations and his family responsibilities.
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OPINION
June 21, 2002
Re "J.C. Brown, 67; Led National Gallery of Art," obituary, June 19: I found it sadly ironic that the death of J. Carter Brown, former director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, coincides with the demise of the grand vista between the Lincoln and Washington monuments. In spite of his excellent record as director of our National Gallery, the Brown-led U.S. Fine Arts Commission seemed incapable of defending the National Mall against the rudely placed World War II Memorial.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1996 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"Fantastic," said J. Carter Brown, breezing into a hotel in Century City and greeting his interviewer as if he couldn't wait to talk about his current projects. Animated enthusiasm and high energy have always been among his strong suits and, in that regard at least, the art world impresario hasn't changed a bit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1996 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"Fantastic," said J. Carter Brown, breezing into a hotel in Century City and greeting his interviewer as if he couldn't wait to talk about his current projects. Animated enthusiasm and high energy have always been among his strong suits and, in that regard at least, the art world impresario hasn't changed a bit.
OPINION
June 21, 2002
Re "J.C. Brown, 67; Led National Gallery of Art," obituary, June 19: I found it sadly ironic that the death of J. Carter Brown, former director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, coincides with the demise of the grand vista between the Lincoln and Washington monuments. In spite of his excellent record as director of our National Gallery, the Brown-led U.S. Fine Arts Commission seemed incapable of defending the National Mall against the rudely placed World War II Memorial.
BOOKS
June 28, 1987 | Robin Russin, Russin, a former Rhodes scholar, taught art history and drawing for several years. He is now a practicing artist and screenwriter
Last August, Andrew Wyeth dropped a bombshell on the artistic community when he revealed a body of more than 240 previously unknown works. Done over a span of 15 years, they formed a counterpoint of moody portraits and nudes of a robust blond woman known only as "Helga."
NEWS
July 25, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal commission demanded extensive revisions in a proposed World War II memorial, agreeing with critics who argued that the design was ill-suited for its site along the National Mall. J. Carter Brown, chairman of the seven-person Commission of Fine Arts, which must approve the design, made it clear that all board members had serious concerns about the winning design of Friedrich St. Florian. The commission's response means that St.
NEWS
February 25, 1989
So, J. Carter Brown, director of the National Gallery of Art, doesn't consider the Brodin statue of an army nurse worthy of a place in the Vietnam Memorial site. "The poor nurse," he said, "looks like she's about to upchuck." (Given the conditions nurses face in war, that seems appropriate and artistically faithful to me!) However, although Brown finds the statue unacceptable for the Vietnam War Memorial, he's willing to include it in the All-Women's Memorial planned for Arlington Cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
New Arts Network: J. Carter Brown, the 22-year National Gallery of Art director who was recently replaced by former L.A. County Museum of Art's Earl A. (Rusty) Powell III, will head Ovation, a new fine arts cable network to start broadcasting in the fall of 1994. Brown said Ovation "will provide drama and other performing arts institutions and art museums with a much-needed showcase for performance, exhibitions and behind-the-scenes updates on the world of the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Standing as an intriguing counterpoint to current trends, a massive show of some 550 pieces of art from Japan settled into Washington's National Gallery on Sunday for a three-month stint. Billed as the biggest show of artistic treasure ever to leave Japan--including a 700-year-old portrait that is the nation's equivalent to the Mona Lisa--"Japan: the Shaping of Daimyo Culture 1185-1868" is being seen as a way to help bridge the gap between the civilizations of the two countries.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
J. Carter Brown has resigned after 22 years as director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington. In a letter released Friday, Brown, 57, said it is time for the gallery to have "fresh leadership" and that it has become difficult to divide his time fairly among his work with various organizations and his family responsibilities.
BOOKS
June 28, 1987 | Robin Russin, Russin, a former Rhodes scholar, taught art history and drawing for several years. He is now a practicing artist and screenwriter
Last August, Andrew Wyeth dropped a bombshell on the artistic community when he revealed a body of more than 240 previously unknown works. Done over a span of 15 years, they formed a counterpoint of moody portraits and nudes of a robust blond woman known only as "Helga."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1995
The strange case of Doris Duke (April 10) and the controversy following her death, including the vilification of her butler Bernard Lafferty, present us with a classic lesson. Henrik Ibsen summed it up best when he wrote, "Money may be the husk of things, but not the kernel. It brings food but not appetite, medicine but not health, acquaintances but not friends, servants but not faithfulness, days of joy but not peace or happiness." Duke never smiled in her pictures: not when she was 10, not when she was 25, not when she was 70. What a lonely life she led, composed of fear and suspicion.
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