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J Carter Brown

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
John Walsh, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu since 1983, has withdrawn from the competition to head the National Gallery of Art in Washington, improving the odds that the post could go to Earl A. (Rusty) Powell, director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. According to sources close to the search process, Walsh had been considered the leading candidate to succeed J. Carter Brown, who resigned in January after 22 years of service.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Portuguese architect Alvaro Siza has won the 1992 Pritzker Architecture Prize. The prestigious award, known as the Nobel of architecture, includes a $100,000 grant, to be presented on May 14 in Chicago. Siza, 58, is known for adapting Modernist principles to buildings that respect the traditions of his native Portugal. "If Post-modernism had not claimed the term, and distorted its meaning, Alvaro Siza's buildings might legitimately have been called by that name.
NEWS
November 10, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
Guests at the White House dinner given by President and Mrs. Reagan on Saturday night in honor of Prince Charles and Princess Diana: Oliver Wright, British ambassador to the United States, and Lady Wright. John Riddell, the prince's private secretary. Michael Shea, the Royal Family's press secretary. David Roycroft, assistant private secretary to the prince. Anne Beckwith-Smith, lady-in-waiting to the princess. Lt. Cmdr. Peter Eberle, personal attendant to the prince.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The last piece of the Soviet art-exchange puzzle finally has fallen into place. The County Museum of Art on Friday morning received word that "The Red Room," a major painting by Henri Matisse, will join 40 other works by Impressionists and early modern masters from Soviet collections in a summer exhibition at the museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
French architect Christian de Portzamparc, a champion of architecture's life-enhancing potential whose adventurous Parisian buildings include a music school, an apartment complex, a cafe and a sculpture museum, has won the 1994 Pritzker Architecture Prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1989 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Times Design Critic
Architect Frank O. Gehry of Santa Monica, who has earned a worldwide reputation for his idiosyncratic designs, has been selected as this year's Pritzker Prize Laureate. Announcement of Gehry's selection will be made today. The international prize consisting of a $100,000 grant and other perks is considered architecture's most prestigious honor. It is funded by the Hyatt Foundation and awarded annually by an independent jury to a living architect. Gehry is the sixth American to receive the prize, which was founded in 1979 as the equivalent to the Nobel Prize.
NEWS
April 10, 1995 | PAUL LIEBERMAN and JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As she lay on her deathbed behind the wrought-iron gates of Falcon Lair, Doris Duke was surrounded by what passed for family after a lifetime spent nurturing one of America's great fortunes. At her side were four enormous guard dogs, her personal maid, the lawyer who drafted the last of her many wills and the man who hit the jackpot in that will--Bernard Lafferty, the soft-spoken Irish butler with the blond ponytail and penchant for diamond jewelry.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Japanese architect Fumihiko Maki, who is revered for fusing cultural elements of the East and the West in meticulously designed modernist buildings, has won the 1993 Pritzker Architecture Prize. The coveted award, known as the Nobel of architecture, includes a $100,000 grant and a medal, which will be presented on June 10 at Prague Castle in the recently formed Czech Republic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1989 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
The Norton Simon Museum is something of a miracle, art experts say, because Simon built his collection long after most acknowledged masterpieces had been safely entrenched in older museums. His is generally recognized as the best repository of European paintings west of Chicago. The now-retired industrialist emerged as a major collector around 1964 when he purchased the entire inventory of legendary dealers, the Duveen Brothers of New York.
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