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BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | By PAUL JACOBS
Who will make big news in the business world this year? Who will emerge from relative obscurity to become a major player? To start the new year, Times business reporters selected people from their beats who they believe will be among those to watch in 2000--in Southern California, across the country and around the world. Some are well known, having made big news in previous years. Others are not exactly household names but nevertheless are likely to make a major impact in their fields.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
November 24, 2007 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
J. Craig Venter, the founder of Celera Genomics, has spent much of the last decade decoding the world. After the federal government spent nearly that long working on the human genome, Venter plunged into the race with a new technology called shotgun sequencing and completed the feat in two years. Since then, he has launched a global expedition to sequence DNA from ocean microbes and recently had his own DNA decoded, publishing the results in a scientific journal.
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SCIENCE
November 24, 2007 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
J. Craig Venter, the founder of Celera Genomics, has spent much of the last decade decoding the world. After the federal government spent nearly that long working on the human genome, Venter plunged into the race with a new technology called shotgun sequencing and completed the feat in two years. Since then, he has launched a global expedition to sequence DNA from ocean microbes and recently had his own DNA decoded, publishing the results in a scientific journal.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2005 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
The pioneer of the human gene mapping project, a maverick who sieved the Sargasso Sea for undiscovered genes, is searching for life in one of the world's harshest environments -- the air of Midtown Manhattan. With a hidden sampling station atop a 40-story office tower in the congested business district of America's most crowded metropolis, J. Craig Venter seeks to trap and identify the genetic material of the myriad microbes that 8 million New Yorkers inhale with every impatient breath. The $2.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the boast heard round the world of science: Surfer-turned-researcher J. Craig Venter announced that he would map human DNA quicker, cheaper and better than an international team that had already chewed on the problem for eight years. Venter was so sure of his method, called "whole-genome shotgun," that he impudently prodded the international team to shift its attention from man to a less glorious organism, the mouse. It didn't.
SCIENCE
August 16, 2002 | From Associated Press
J. Craig Venter, whose former company spent two years mapping human DNA, unveiled plans Wednesday to open a research center that will be capable of decoding a person's genes in seconds. He said he hopes the DNA sequencing, which now can take months and costs millions of dollars, will be done for about $1,000. Making it widely available could help doctors predict what diseases patients may face and treat problems before they arise.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To his admirers and shareholders, J. Craig Venter is a corporate wizard of gene deciphering, a magician of the genetic code. As president and chief scientific officer of Celera Genomics, his vision has allowed the 2-year-old company to lay claim to what is arguably the more complete of the two versions of the human genome--the genetic instruction manual for the human body.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2005 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
The pioneer of the human gene mapping project, a maverick who sieved the Sargasso Sea for undiscovered genes, is searching for life in one of the world's harshest environments -- the air of Midtown Manhattan. With a hidden sampling station atop a 40-story office tower in the congested business district of America's most crowded metropolis, J. Craig Venter seeks to trap and identify the genetic material of the myriad microbes that 8 million New Yorkers inhale with every impatient breath. The $2.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2002
* U.S. gasoline prices remained unchanged over the last week at a national average of $1.404 a gallon, the Energy Department said. The West Coast had the most expensive regular self-serve gasoline, although the average price in the region was down 0.1 cent a gallon to $1.541. * Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. lost its top Aaa debt rating from Moody's Investors Service, falling two levels to Aa2, because of delays in new products and disappointing sales at the fifth-largest drug maker.
SCIENCE
September 26, 2003 | From Reuters
The gene map of man's best friend shows dogs are closely related to people and will add insights into our own genetics, scientists said Thursday. The method used to map out the canine genes is much quicker than that used to sequence humans and offers a fast way to look at other mammals, the scientists said. "It is a new method for the rapid characterization of genomes," said J. Craig Venter, whose Center for the Advancement of Genomics in Rockville, Md., paid for the study.
SCIENCE
August 16, 2002 | From Associated Press
J. Craig Venter, whose former company spent two years mapping human DNA, unveiled plans Wednesday to open a research center that will be capable of decoding a person's genes in seconds. He said he hopes the DNA sequencing, which now can take months and costs millions of dollars, will be done for about $1,000. Making it widely available could help doctors predict what diseases patients may face and treat problems before they arise.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the boast heard round the world of science: Surfer-turned-researcher J. Craig Venter announced that he would map human DNA quicker, cheaper and better than an international team that had already chewed on the problem for eight years. Venter was so sure of his method, called "whole-genome shotgun," that he impudently prodded the international team to shift its attention from man to a less glorious organism, the mouse. It didn't.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To his admirers and shareholders, J. Craig Venter is a corporate wizard of gene deciphering, a magician of the genetic code. As president and chief scientific officer of Celera Genomics, his vision has allowed the 2-year-old company to lay claim to what is arguably the more complete of the two versions of the human genome--the genetic instruction manual for the human body.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | By PAUL JACOBS
Who will make big news in the business world this year? Who will emerge from relative obscurity to become a major player? To start the new year, Times business reporters selected people from their beats who they believe will be among those to watch in 2000--in Southern California, across the country and around the world. Some are well known, having made big news in previous years. Others are not exactly household names but nevertheless are likely to make a major impact in their fields.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1998
Scientists have been unraveling genomes, the DNA software of various species, since the 1980s. But the practical implications of that esoteric work are now strikingly brought to earth. In this week's issue of the British science journal Nature, researchers at England's Sanger Center and the Pasteur Institute in Paris report success at unraveling the genome of the tuberculosis bacterium, which kills more people than any other infectious agent.
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