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J Craig Venter

NEWS
June 27, 2000 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first draft of the entire human genome ultimately will bring a wealth of scientific knowledge about ourselves. But it could also bring a heap of trouble. Controversial advances that push society to the edge of the scientific frontier frequently pose ethical dilemmas before public policy has had a chance to address them, bioethicists say.
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OPINION
January 7, 2007 | Richard Dawkins;Max Tegmark;Jonathan Haidt;James O'Donnell;Steven Pinker;Jean Pigozzi;Jared Diamond;J. Craig Venter;Roger Highfield
EVERY YEAR SINCE 1996, the online salon Edge has e-mailed a question to scientists and thinkers about the state of the world. This year's question was: "What are you optimistic about?" Below are excerpts of some of the responses. For full responses (and those of other contributors), go to www.edge.org.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the publicly led drive to crack the human genetic code have quietly refused to submit the research paper describing their findings to the same scientific journal as their private-sector rivals, puncturing a truce announced with great fanfare in June by President Clinton. The move revives one of the fiercest rivalries of modern science, which pits the publicly led Human Genome Project against biotech upstart Celera Genomics.
SCIENCE
June 13, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
After five years of toil, a consortium of several hundred U.S. researchers has released a detailed census of the myriad bacteria, yeasts, viruses and amoebas that live, eat, excrete, reproduce and die in or on us. Described in two papers in Nature and a raft of reports in other journals, the data released Wednesday describe microbes of the skin, saliva, nostrils, guts and other areas of 242 adults in tiptop health. The $170-million, federally funded Human Microbiome Project also cataloged the genes contained within this zoo of life.
NEWS
June 27, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everybody has a particular way of entering a room. Francis Collins' is to come in quietly behind controversial figures. In 1992, Collins took charge of the publicly led Human Genome Project after James D. Watson, the voluble co-discoverer of DNA's structure, quit in a spat with his government superiors. He was pushed farther into the limelight when J. Craig Venter, the mercurial president of Celera Genomics, announced his determination to beat Collins' team to cracking the genetic code.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The prestigious journal Science is on the verge of striking an unusual bargain: In return for the right to publish a path-breaking paper on the human genetic code, it would allow the paper's biotech company authors to make their supporting data accessible only to those who promise not to use them for commercial or certain other purposes.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2000 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monsanto Co. said Tuesday that it has completed "a working draft" of the genetic code of the rice plant--paving the way for improved nutrition, crop yields and drought tolerance, traits needed to feed a growing world population. It is the first plant genome to reach this advanced stage of completion, and scientists say it is especially significant because almost half of the world's people, most of them in Asia, depend on rice as the main staple in their diet.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2000 | PAUL JACOBS and PETER G. GOSSELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A biotech company announced Thursday that it has deciphered the genome of a human volunteer, claiming a scientific first that was greeted by both praise and skepticism from academic scientists who point out that the job remains unfinished. Celera Genomics, in a race with a public effort to map the human genetic code, said it has decoded millions of DNA fragments extracted from an anonymous person--the first phase of its effort to put together a so-called working draft of the genome.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1994
The early discoverers of and experimenters with electricity could hardly have imagined how their work would ultimately transform the world. A similar technological upheaval awaits us now as private business starts to exploit the revolution in molecular biology to bring new cures, therapies and we-know-not-what. Just four decades after James D. Watson and Francis H. C.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2000 | PETER G. GOSSELIN and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A private company that is racing to be the first to map the human genome claimed Monday that it has now deciphered more than 90% of the material that goes into the human genetic code--a signal that the search for the Holy Grail of biotechnology is likely to be completed in a matter of months. Celera Genomics Group, a Rockville, Md., subsidiary of PE Corp., said it expects to have a "rough draft" of the entire code by early summer.
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