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J D Salinger

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NEWS
August 5, 1988 | KATHERINE STEPHEN
When he was 17, a provincial, intensely literary young man discovered a blue hardback in a secondhand bookstore in a northern English town. The book was "The Catcher in the Rye." That novel, published in 1951, was by the hitherto barely known American writer, J. D. Salinger. By the time the young Englishman, Ian Hamilton, discovered it, the book had already achieved critical acclaim and become a best-seller. But unknown to Hamilton, it was becoming clear that the book was more than that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Buzzfeed is reporting that three previously unavailable stories by J.D. Salinger have been leaked online this evening, apparently in PDF and other versions of a small print book. The collection, titled “Three Stories,” and featuring a plain black cover, includes “Birthday Boy,” “Paula” and “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls.” The latter piece is a precursor, of sorts, to “The Catcher in the Rye,” detailing the death of Holden Caulfield's brother, named Kenneth in the story, not Allie as he is in the finished book.
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NEWS
January 20, 1997 | DAVID STREITFELD, THE WASHINGTON POST
J.D. Salinger, whose life has been one long campaign to erase himself from the public eye, is reversing himself somewhat at 78. Next month will see the publication of "Hapworth 16, 1924," the first new Salinger book in 34 years. Salinger is one of the most enduring and influential postwar American writers, and any New York publisher would have paid a bundle for the rights to the story, which appeared in the New Yorker in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
When Shane Salerno turned 40 last year, he decided it was finally time to let his obsession go. The screenwriter, best known for his collaborations with Michael Bay ("Armageddon") and Oliver Stone ("Savages"), had toiled for close to a decade trying to document the mysterious life of J.D. Salinger. The author of the bestselling "The Catcher in the Rye" had stopped publishing in 1965 and retreated from the public spotlight, leaving fans to wonder why - and to guess about what he had been doing in the 45 years until his death in 2010.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2006 | From Associated Press
A scholarship named for writer J.D. Salinger will allow young writers with "quirky brilliance" to literally follow in his footsteps at Ursinus College. Recipients of the newly created scholarship, announced Thursday, will get to live in Salinger's old dorm room at Ursinus, where the author of "The Catcher in the Rye" spent the fall semester of 1938.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | LINTON WEEKS, THE WASHINGTON POST
Why can't we just leave J.D. Salinger the hell alone? With the publication this week of Margaret A. Salinger's memoir, "Dream Catcher"--a dark strife-with-father portrait of a bedeviled life, the world will again lift the rock and turn a flashlight on the strange, seclusive writer. The book has just about everything you'd look for in a Salinger story. Clear writing. Edgy characters. A dash of death. A pinch of sex. A dollop of loneliness. And lots and lots of weirdness.
NEWS
January 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Author J. D. Salinger won his legal fight to block an unauthorized biography Thursday when a federal appeals court directed a lower court to issue a preliminary injunction barring publication of the book. Salinger, author of "The Catcher in the Rye," filed a civil suit last October in federal court here to block Random House from publishing "J. D. Salinger: A Writing Life."
NEWS
December 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Sotheby's auction house will sell 32 letters and postcards author J.D. Salinger wrote his daughter over a 35-year period beginning in 1958. The 43 pages of correspondence between Margaret "Peggy" Salinger and her father could bring as much as $350,000, a Sotheby's official said. The lot goes up for bid Wednesday. The letters cover everything from the mundane to details that "capture the voice of the great author," Sotheby's said.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | Associated Press
A 35-year correspondence between "The Catcher in the Rye" author J.D. Salinger and his daughter Margaret failed to sell at auction Wednesday. Bidding for the 32 letters at the Sotheby's auction house started at $130,000 and was stopped at $170,000 because it did not meet the minimum price the seller was willing to accept, said Lauren Gioia, a Sotheby's spokeswoman. Sotheby's had estimated the letters would sell for between $250,000 and $350,000.
NEWS
August 28, 2002 | TIM RUTTEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every culture has its central rite of passage--a pilgrimage, a quest, a time of testing. For Americans and their cultural fellow travelers, the defining experience is adolescent alienation. What better preparation, after all, for life in a society where the worship of autonomy has turned individualism into isolation? Hence the enduring popularity of J.D. Salinger and his iconically alienated creations, Holden Caulfield and the family Glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
J.D. Salinger spent almost half a century hiding in plain sight. This is perhaps the most interesting revelation both in David Shields and Shane Salerno's oral biography “Salinger” and its accompanying documentary (which opens this week in New York and Los Angeles) - that far from being a recluse in the traditional sense, Salinger led, for a while anyway, an unexpectedly connected life. He traveled, he saw friends, he raised children. He interacted with the townspeople of Cornish, N.H., and Windsor, Vt. And, it is now confirmed, he wrote: at least five volumes of material that is scheduled to be published over the next several years, as well as a copious store of letters to acquaintances, admirers and romantic partners, some of which are quoted in Shields and Salerno's book.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
A plane carrying some people connected with the film "Salinger," a highly anticipated documentary about writer J.D. Salinger, crash-landed at Telluride Regional Airport in southwestern Colorado on Sunday afternoon. The left landing gear collapsed, and the Beechcraft 1900D turbo-prop skidded on its belly, but no injuries were reported to the 10 passengers and two crew members aboard, according to the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office. A warning light had indicated there was a problem with the equipment before landing, the sheriff's office said, so emergency crews were alerted and stood by as the plane touched down shortly after 1 p.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When news emerged three years ago that filmmaker Shane Salerno and writer David Shields were working on a lengthy oral biography (with accompanying documentary) about J.D. Salinger, I assumed it would be all smoke and no fire. Salinger, after all, had gone to ground after the publication of his novella “Hapworth 16, 1924” in the June 19, 1965, issue of the New Yorker; even in the wake of his death, in January 2010 at age 91, his estate had preserved the silence of his final 45 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
It's almost dizzying: J.D. Salinger, the most famous yet reclusive author of the 20th century, is now being propelled into the spotlight with a documentary, a mammoth, deeply researched biography and, reportedly, five never-before-published books. He couldn't have planned a better publicity juggernaut if he tried. “He's going to have a second act unlike any writer in history ,” biography co-author Shane Salerno told the New York Times. “There's no precedent for this.” The book "Salinger," written by Salerno and David Shields, will be published by Simon & Schuster on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
In the first week of September, Shane Salerno and David Shields' massive biography "Salinger" will go on sale, and before the week is out, the documentary "Salinger," written and directed by Salerno, will open in more than 200 theaters. When it comes to documentaries, that's huge -- it's being positioned to be an art-house blockbuster. So the teasers are coming. An exclusive USA Today preview Wednesday showcased a never-before-seen photograph of Salinger in uniform with three counterintelligence buddies after the invasion of Normandy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The fictional writer A.N. Dyer - Andrew to his family - is dying as David Gilbert's new novel "& Sons" opens. Dyer is a New York writer in the mold of J.D. Salinger: When he was in his 20s, he wrote a book about his New England prep school, a novel whose portrait of teenage angst and white privilege was a success rivaling that of "The Catcher in the Rye. " Dyer is "the quintessential New York writer. " And his gloomy presence is at the heart of "& Sons," whose most notable achievement is its portrait of that most respected and mysterious of artistic types: the great novelist.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
In the first week of September, Shane Salerno and David Shields' massive biography "Salinger" will go on sale, and before the week is out, the documentary "Salinger," written and directed by Salerno, will open in more than 200 theaters. When it comes to documentaries, that's huge -- it's being positioned to be an art-house blockbuster. So the teasers are coming. An exclusive USA Today preview Wednesday showcased a never-before-seen photograph of Salinger in uniform with three counterintelligence buddies after the invasion of Normandy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Buzzfeed is reporting that three previously unavailable stories by J.D. Salinger have been leaked online this evening, apparently in PDF and other versions of a small print book. The collection, titled “Three Stories,” and featuring a plain black cover, includes “Birthday Boy,” “Paula” and “The Ocean Full of Bowling Balls.” The latter piece is a precursor, of sorts, to “The Catcher in the Rye,” detailing the death of Holden Caulfield's brother, named Kenneth in the story, not Allie as he is in the finished book.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
J.D. Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye" was one of the most popular books of the 1950s. Adolescent narrator Holden Caufield's reluctance to go along with societal norms helped lay the psychic groundwork of the countercultural movement of the 1960s. But where the Beats rode that wave, with Allen Ginsberg reading poetry at massive student demonstrations, Salinger withdrew. He'd been a New Yorker, but he moved to rural New England, away from the center of publishing. His last published work appeared in 1965.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
Screenwriter Shane Salerno ("Savages," "Shaft") has spent close to a decade on a singular obsession: the reclusive late author J.D. Salinger. Now his work is finally coming to fruition. Via a flurry of deals the filmmaker struck in March with the Weinstein Co., PBS' "American Masters" and Simon & Schuster, his exhaustive work on the "Catcher in the Rye" author will debut in September. The Weinstein Co. on Thursday debuted the first trailer from "Salinger," the documentary about the mysterious writer, ahead of its Sept.
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