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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury found Nancy Hoover Hunter, an accused participant in a major fraud scheme, guilty Monday on four counts of tax evasion and acquitted her of one other tax-related charge but could not reach a decision on the more pertinent charges against her. Hunter was accused of helping to carry out a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme along with financier J. David Dominelli, who is serving a 20-year term in federal prison for his role as the mastermind of the fraud.
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NEWS
May 4, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who ultimately admitted criminal involvement in the $80-million J. David & Co. investment fraud, testified Friday as a government witness and confessed that she lied on the stand when she was on trial two years ago. Hunter, 52, who essentially served as second-in-command at the now-defunct La Jolla investment firm, said she was admitting her lies because she hoped to win a reduction of her 10-year prison term.
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BUSINESS
August 28, 1987 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
The law firm of Wiles, Circuit & Tremblay and Michael A. Clark, a former partner in the firm, were found by a San Diego County Superior Court judge Thursday to have aided and abetted convicted swindler J. David Dominelli's fraudulent investment operation, which bilked investors out of $83 million. The La Jolla law firm and Clark were also found to have been professionally negligent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury found Nancy Hoover Hunter, an accused participant in a major fraud scheme, guilty Monday on four counts of tax evasion and acquitted her of one other tax-related charge but could not reach a decision on the more pertinent charges against her. Hunter was accused of helping to carry out a multimillion-dollar Ponzi scheme along with financier J. David Dominelli, who is serving a 20-year term in federal prison for his role as the mastermind of the fraud.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nancy Hoover Hunter, the former mayor of Del Mar who ultimately admitted criminal involvement in the $80-million J. David & Co. investment fraud, testified Friday as a government witness and confessed that she lied on the stand when she was on trial two years ago. Hunter, 52, who essentially served as second-in-command at the now-defunct La Jolla investment firm, said she was admitting her lies because she hoped to win a reduction of her 10-year prison term.
MAGAZINE
June 7, 1987 | STEVE CHAPPLE, Steve Chapple's most recent book was "Outlaws in Babylon." His next is "Burning Desires: Love and Lust in Dangerous Times" (with David Talbot), which will be published by Dolphin / Doubleday.
NEITHER FATHER NOR DAUGHTER looks much like a detective. He, Larry Larsen, is tall and roly-poly, at 47 not quite fat--rather, large and dignified. Invariably, he wears a blue Oxford button-down shirt with a pen sticking out of the breast pocket. His manner is at first goofy, like TV detective Colombo's, yet even more disarming than that. Daughter Linda, 27, is the opposite: thin, tough, new wave, a black malachite stud in her right ear, two pearls in the left.
NEWS
February 3, 1986 | Associated Press
Former financier J. David Dominelli, already serving a 20-year federal prison term for defrauding investors, today pleaded guilty to state charges arising from a plot to illegally finance former Mayor Roger Hedgecock's 1983 campaign. Dominelli, who suffered a stroke last October, was sentenced to two years in state prison after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy. He will serve the state prison sentence concurrently with his 20-year federal term.
NEWS
March 28, 1986
Convicted swindler J. David Dominelli was conscious and recovering from a mild stroke suffered in prison in Northern California, a federal prosecutor said. "He's responding to treatment," said Asst. U.S. Atty. George Hardy. Dominelli, 44, is serving a 20-year sentence at the federal correctional center at Pleasanton for fraud and tax evasion related to the February, 1984, bankruptcy of his J. David & Co. international currency trading firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1986
A preliminary hearing for two defendants charged with conspiring to illegally funnel money into former mayor Roger Hedgecock's campaign should be open to the press and public, a judge ruled Tuesday. Attorneys for Nancy Hoover and former political consultant Tom Shepard had sought a closed hearing, contending that extensive publicity about the case could prevent a fair trial. Municipal Judge Robert Stahl disagreed and rejected the motion. The defense attorneys indicated they would appeal.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1987 | CHRIS KRAUL, San Diego County Business Editor
The law firm of Wiles, Circuit & Tremblay and Michael A. Clark, a former partner in the firm, were found by a San Diego County Superior Court judge Thursday to have aided and abetted convicted swindler J. David Dominelli's fraudulent investment operation, which bilked investors out of $83 million. The La Jolla law firm and Clark were also found to have been professionally negligent.
MAGAZINE
June 7, 1987 | STEVE CHAPPLE, Steve Chapple's most recent book was "Outlaws in Babylon." His next is "Burning Desires: Love and Lust in Dangerous Times" (with David Talbot), which will be published by Dolphin / Doubleday.
NEITHER FATHER NOR DAUGHTER looks much like a detective. He, Larry Larsen, is tall and roly-poly, at 47 not quite fat--rather, large and dignified. Invariably, he wears a blue Oxford button-down shirt with a pen sticking out of the breast pocket. His manner is at first goofy, like TV detective Colombo's, yet even more disarming than that. Daughter Linda, 27, is the opposite: thin, tough, new wave, a black malachite stud in her right ear, two pearls in the left.
NEWS
January 25, 1985 | Associated Press
Lawyers for both sides rested their cases Thursday in Mayor Roger Hedgecock's conspiracy and perjury trial, clearing the way for jury deliberation to begin next week. "Now it's up to the jury, the judge and the lawyers," said Hedgecock, who testified for seven hours, against his lawyer's advice. "I'm happy I decided to testify. . . . But I don't know if I got the chance to get every detail out."
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