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J Edgar Hoover

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NEWS
February 6, 1993 | From Associated Press
A new book contends that former FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover was a homosexual who was blackmailed by the Mafia into denying the existence of organized crime for decades. Author Anthony Summers writes in his book, "Official and Confidential: The Secret Life of J.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2012 | By Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
Each week, the FBI sends reporters an email of "top ten news stories" that it hopes will hit the headlines. The press releases usually highlight crooks nabbed, terrorism plots foiled and convictions notched up by the straight-shooting, gang-busting agents from the world's most famous law enforcement agency. It's doubtful any of the cases the FBI likes to publicize made it into Tim Weiner's absorbing "Enemies: A History of the FBI. " It is a scathing indictment of the FBI as a secret intelligence service that has bent and broken the law for decades in the pursuit of Communists, terrorists and spies.
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NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
For Leonardo DiCaprio, any story worth telling starts with a question. "Why?" the actor said, banging his fist on a table. "His personal life, his tactics, what drove him, what were his motives? What the hell did he really want?" The man instigating this particular "why" is J. Edgar Hoover, whom DiCaprio plays in the new biopic of the controversial FBI chief directed by Clint Eastwood. But the star of "J. Edgar" could as easily be asking about the other complex characters he has brought to the screen in the last decade — obsessive magnate Howard Hughes in "The Aviator," mysterious U.S. Marshal Teddy Daniels in "Shutter Island," grieving dream hijacker Dom Cobb in "Inception.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | CHARLES HILLINGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It has been 13 1/2 years since San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk was gunned down, along with Mayor George Moscone, in San Francisco City Hall. But Milk's remains have yet to find a final resting place, and for the last six years the ashes of the first avowed homosexual elected to office in California have sat in an urn in a corner of a vault in the office of the Congressional Cemetery here.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1993 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allegations that the late Walt Disney was a secret FBI informant for more than 25 years captured Hollywood's attention in a big way Thursday, as executives debated whether it would soil his reputation. The information about the man who created Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck, and whose squeaky-clean image came to symbolize family values, is contained in an unauthorized biography: "Walt Disney: Hollywood's Dark Prince," by Marc Eliot.
BOOKS
September 8, 1991 | Robert Sherrill, Sherrill is corporations correspondent for The Nation and was a Post-Toasties Junior G-Man
In "J. Edgar Hoover: The Man and the Secrets" we get chilling proof that, given enough power, a single bureaucrat can poison an entire government. Let me assure you that Curt Gentry is no Kitty Kelley. His goal, which he achieves, is not to sift through a life hunting only for what titillates, but to write a rounded biography, cradle to grave. It just so happens that Hoover's cradle and grave were in Washington, D.C.
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | PETER FINN, WASHINGTON POST
What do Meriwether Lewis, Jesse James and J. Edgar Hoover have in common? Yes, they're all dead. But aside from that? Why, James Starrs, celebrity gravedigger and sleuth of the possibly slain, of course. The George Washington University professor of law and forensic sciences, who dug up James and wants to dig up Lewis, has a new project. Starrs is organizing a program for February's annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences on "The Death of J.
NEWS
February 23, 1987
Richard M. Nixon decided in October, 1971, to end J. Edgar Hoover's 48-year tenure as director of the FBI and name him a "consultant to the President," NBC News said. The network said the decision is reflected in the locked Nixon personal files at the National Archives but that it is unclear from the papers whether Nixon ever told Hoover he was fired. Hoover died in May, 1972, still in the job as director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000
No episode in the violent history of Southern segregationist resistance to the civil rights movement more outraged the national conscience than the Sunday morning bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963, an atrocity that left four African American girls dead and a score of other people injured. The FBI assigned several hundred investigators to the case, and four men with ties to the Ku Klux Klan were quickly identified as prime suspects.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"J. Edgar" is a somber, enigmatic, darkly fascinating tale, and how could it be otherwise? This brooding, shadow-drenched melodrama with strong political overtones examines the public and private lives of a strange, tortured man who had a phenomenal will to power. A man with the keenest instincts for manipulating the levers of government, he headed the omnipotent Federal Bureau of Investigation for 48 years. Though in theory he served eight presidents, in practice J. Edgar Hoover served only himself.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2011 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
In February 1970, a top aide to President Nixon warned J. Edgar Hoover that a new reporter in town, Jack Nelson, was said to be gunning for the FBI. Hoover took the advice to heart. "Keep an eye on these characters," the FBI director wrote his subordinates, referring to Nelson and two of his editors at the Los Angeles Times. "They are up to no good. " As reports on Nelson's activities poured in from FBI field offices, Hoover would scribble comments across the bottom. The more he read, the more vitriolic he became.
OPINION
June 14, 2007 | Kenneth D. Ackerman, KENNETH D. ACKERMAN is author of "Young J. Edgar: Hoover, the Red Scare, and the Assault on Civil Liberties."
WHAT created J. Edgar Hoover? He reigned with an iron fist as director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for 48 years, until the day he died in 1972. By then, Hoover had evolved into an untouchable autocrat, a man who kept secret files on millions of Americans over the years and used them to blackmail presidents, senators and movie stars. He ordered burglaries, secret wiretaps or sabotage against anyone he personally considered subversive. His target list included the Rev.
NATIONAL
December 31, 2005 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Every year for the last three years, Rep. Dan Burton, a Republican from Indiana, has introduced a bill to strip J. Edgar Hoover's name from the FBI's headquarters -- an initiative that has been largely ignored. Now, however, amid headlines about possibly illegal government surveillance of Americans inside the United States, the effort to rename the Hoover building is starting to attract more supporters, most recently U.S. Circuit Judge Laurence H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000
No episode in the violent history of Southern segregationist resistance to the civil rights movement more outraged the national conscience than the Sunday morning bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala., in 1963, an atrocity that left four African American girls dead and a score of other people injured. The FBI assigned several hundred investigators to the case, and four men with ties to the Ku Klux Klan were quickly identified as prime suspects.
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For three decades, Fernando Gutierrez Barrios was Mexico's spymaster. He helped Fidel Castro--and also helped U.S. agents monitor Cuba. At home, Gutierrez Barrios directed the security police--feared agents who "disappeared" scores of guerrillas. Gutierrez Barrios has been a repressor. A back-room negotiator. But now, at 71, he is taking on perhaps his oddest role: democrat.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The latest edition of "Biography" doesn't make you like the Arts & Entertainment series any less, but it does make you like PBS' "Frontline" series all the more. Had "Biography's" hourlong portrait, "J. Edgar Hoover" (at 5 and 9 tonight on A&E) run before "Frontline's" recent, shattering expose of Hoover's life, it would stand as a perfectly serviceable record of the supreme U.S. bureaucrat and decades-long head of the FBI.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
The FBI once suspected former Supreme Court Justice Arthur Goldberg of being associated with Communists and even considered the possibility of "custodial detention" for him before World War II, according to a newspaper report. The possibility of detention and a 1941 letter from then-FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover listing Goldberg as being "closely associated with Communist leaders in Illinois" are among 800 pages of FBI files obtained by USA Today, the newspaper reported in Monday's editions.
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | PETER FINN, WASHINGTON POST
What do Meriwether Lewis, Jesse James and J. Edgar Hoover have in common? Yes, they're all dead. But aside from that? Why, James Starrs, celebrity gravedigger and sleuth of the possibly slain, of course. The George Washington University professor of law and forensic sciences, who dug up James and wants to dig up Lewis, has a new project. Starrs is organizing a program for February's annual meeting of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences on "The Death of J.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
The FBI once suspected former Supreme Court Justice Arthur Goldberg of being associated with Communists and even considered the possibility of "custodial detention" for him before World War II, according to a newspaper report. The possibility of detention and a 1941 letter from then-FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover listing Goldberg as being "closely associated with Communist leaders in Illinois" are among 800 pages of FBI files obtained by USA Today, the newspaper reported in Monday's editions.
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