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NEWS
September 6, 1988
The agribusiness giant J.G. Boswell Co. is asking for a new trial in Bakersfield after it was ordered to pay $13.5 million in damages to three Kern County farmers. A jury ordered Boswell to pay the actual and punitive damages after hearing the case of Jack and Jeff Thomson and Ken Wegis. The three charged Boswell with filing a false and malicious libel suit against them to suppress their support for the Peripheral Canal campaign in 1982.
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NEWS
February 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
After more than a year of political and legal wrangling, J.G. Boswell Co. has won its bid to develop four massive dairies on old cotton farmland. With Kings County Planning Commission permits in hand this week, the cotton giant can now find buyers--dairymen looking to relocate or expand their herds. The project is expected to put as many as 47,700 cows on 6,000 acres halfway between Hanford and Corcoran. Four of five commissioners voted in favor of the project after a brief meeting.
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BUSINESS
February 26, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, agriculture reporter
Boswell's Plan OKd: Cotton titan J.G. Boswell Co. this week won approval from the Kings County Board of Supervisors to sell land intended for five mega-dairies on 7,000 acres between Hanford and Corcoran in Central California. At capacity, the dairies could house up to 30,000 milking cows. Pasadena-based Boswell is pitching the properties to dairies in the crowded Chino Valley, east of Los Angeles, where dairy pollution and urban development are forcing farmers to seek other locations.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, agriculture reporter
Boswell's Plan OKd: Cotton titan J.G. Boswell Co. this week won approval from the Kings County Board of Supervisors to sell land intended for five mega-dairies on 7,000 acres between Hanford and Corcoran in Central California. At capacity, the dairies could house up to 30,000 milking cows. Pasadena-based Boswell is pitching the properties to dairies in the crowded Chino Valley, east of Los Angeles, where dairy pollution and urban development are forcing farmers to seek other locations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
J. G. Boswell Co., California's biggest farming enterprise, lost an appeal in the 5th District State Court of Appeal of an $11.1-million judgment for malicious prosecution of three Kern County farmers. Boswell filed a libel suit over ads that growers Ken Wegis, Jack Thomson and his son, Jeff, ran in local newspapers during a bitter campaign over the Peripheral Canal. The ads criticized the company for opposing the canal and providing financing to help defeat it in 1982.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld an $11.1-million award to three Kern County farmers who sued the J. G. Boswell Co. for malicious prosecution. The high court denied a request by Boswell to review a 1988 Kern County jury's decision that the cotton grower abused the legal process to silence political opponents. The fight began in 1982 over a referendum to build a canal that would have carried water from the Sacramento River to growers in the south.
NEWS
February 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
After more than a year of political and legal wrangling, J.G. Boswell Co. has won its bid to develop four massive dairies on old cotton farmland. With Kings County Planning Commission permits in hand this week, the cotton giant can now find buyers--dairymen looking to relocate or expand their herds. The project is expected to put as many as 47,700 cows on 6,000 acres halfway between Hanford and Corcoran. Four of five commissioners voted in favor of the project after a brief meeting.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES
J.G. Boswell Co. has been the main force in farming within the Tulare Lake basin for more than 70 years. The company was founded by Col. James Griffin Boswell, one of 13 children from a patrician cotton-farming family that was chased out of Georgia by the boll weevil in the 1920s. Boswell migrated to Corcoran and began carving out a cotton-growing and -ginning empire. He and other farmers struggled to control the four rivers that emptied into the lake.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday let stand a milestone $11.1-million malicious-prosecution award against a San Joaquin Valley agribusiness giant for bringing an unwarranted libel suit against three local farmers. The award was the largest of its kind in a counteraction against a type of suit allegedly designed to stifle political opposition. Such a suit is known by critics as a SLAPP, or Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J.G. Boswell Co. likes its agriculture big. A cotton titan reputed to be the world's single largest farming entity, Boswell is busily promoting an immense "planned dairy farm community" in Kings County. At capacity, it would house a total of more than 55,000 cows on 7,000 acres now known as Chamberlain Ranch.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J.G. Boswell Co. likes its agriculture big. A cotton titan reputed to be the world's single largest farming entity, Boswell is busily promoting an immense "planned dairy farm community" in Kings County. At capacity, it would house a total of more than 55,000 cows on 7,000 acres now known as Chamberlain Ranch.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES
J.G. Boswell Co. has been the main force in farming within the Tulare Lake basin for more than 70 years. The company was founded by Col. James Griffin Boswell, one of 13 children from a patrician cotton-farming family that was chased out of Georgia by the boll weevil in the 1920s. Boswell migrated to Corcoran and began carving out a cotton-growing and -ginning empire. He and other farmers struggled to control the four rivers that emptied into the lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld an $11.1-million award to three Kern County farmers who sued the J. G. Boswell Co. for malicious prosecution. The high court denied a request by Boswell to review a 1988 Kern County jury's decision that the cotton grower abused the legal process to silence political opponents. The fight began in 1982 over a referendum to build a canal that would have carried water from the Sacramento River to growers in the south.
NEWS
October 4, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday let stand a milestone $11.1-million malicious-prosecution award against a San Joaquin Valley agribusiness giant for bringing an unwarranted libel suit against three local farmers. The award was the largest of its kind in a counteraction against a type of suit allegedly designed to stifle political opposition. Such a suit is known by critics as a SLAPP, or Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
J. G. Boswell Co., California's biggest farming enterprise, lost an appeal in the 5th District State Court of Appeal of an $11.1-million judgment for malicious prosecution of three Kern County farmers. Boswell filed a libel suit over ads that growers Ken Wegis, Jack Thomson and his son, Jeff, ran in local newspapers during a bitter campaign over the Peripheral Canal. The ads criticized the company for opposing the canal and providing financing to help defeat it in 1982.
NEWS
September 6, 1988
The agribusiness giant J.G. Boswell Co. is asking for a new trial in Bakersfield after it was ordered to pay $13.5 million in damages to three Kern County farmers. A jury ordered Boswell to pay the actual and punitive damages after hearing the case of Jack and Jeff Thomson and Ken Wegis. The three charged Boswell with filing a false and malicious libel suit against them to suppress their support for the Peripheral Canal campaign in 1982.
NEWS
July 16, 1988 | Associated Press
An unusual trial involving a libel countersuit has ended with a jury ordering the giant J. G. Boswell farming company to pay three farmers $10.5 million in punitive damages. The same Kern County Superior Court panel that earlier ordered Boswell to pay $3 million in general damages also awarded the massive punitive damages on a 10-2 vote. The winning plaintiffs--Arvin-area farmers Jack and Jeff Thomson and Ken Wegis--claimed that Thursday's punitive award could have national significance.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1985
Predicting a depressed farm economy for several more years, Boswell, one of the nation's largest farm operators, said it will offer millions of dollars in incentives to get most of its California work force to quit. Officials of the firm are distributing letters with the early retirement and severance offers to 600 of the firm's 900 employees in the state. The letters stressed that it was a one-time offer that will be withdrawn Dec. 31.
NEWS
July 16, 1988 | Associated Press
An unusual trial involving a libel countersuit has ended with a jury ordering the giant J. G. Boswell farming company to pay three farmers $10.5 million in punitive damages. The same Kern County Superior Court panel that earlier ordered Boswell to pay $3 million in general damages also awarded the massive punitive damages on a 10-2 vote. The winning plaintiffs--Arvin-area farmers Jack and Jeff Thomson and Ken Wegis--claimed that Thursday's punitive award could have national significance.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1985
Predicting a depressed farm economy for several more years, Boswell, one of the nation's largest farm operators, said it will offer millions of dollars in incentives to get most of its California work force to quit. Officials of the firm are distributing letters with the early retirement and severance offers to 600 of the firm's 900 employees in the state. The letters stressed that it was a one-time offer that will be withdrawn Dec. 31.
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