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October 30, 1998 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any day J. Gordon Melton reports for work, California's off-kilter image is in capable hands. People who know the state well could argue that Melton, a writer and editor for Gale publishing company, isn't inventing anything. He's just keeping track of what goes on all around him. Given his interests, that includes new religions, old cults and a fascination with vampires.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2006 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
It's often said of academics, but for J. Gordon Melton it's true: He really does have an encyclopedic mind. After all, Melton is the author of the Encyclopedia of American Religions, the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology and the Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena. Then, for fun, there's "The Vampire Book: The Encyclopedia of the Undead." "It's my little niche," Melton said. Actually, it's a big niche.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2006 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
It's often said of academics, but for J. Gordon Melton it's true: He really does have an encyclopedic mind. After all, Melton is the author of the Encyclopedia of American Religions, the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology and the Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena. Then, for fun, there's "The Vampire Book: The Encyclopedia of the Undead." "It's my little niche," Melton said. Actually, it's a big niche.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any day J. Gordon Melton reports for work, California's off-kilter image is in capable hands. People who know the state well could argue that Melton, a writer and editor for Gale publishing company, isn't inventing anything. He's just keeping track of what goes on all around him. Given his interests, that includes new religions, old cults and a fascination with vampires.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN, Terry Pristin is a Times staff writer. and
Wearing feathers in her hair, spike heels and a strapless evening gown, Marianne Williamson, New Age guru of the hour, is seated on a hotel ballroom stage in Marina del Rey, shoulder to shoulder with unmarried soap opera actors and other eligible and glamorous singles. Amid much banter and giggling, they will be "auctioned off" by talk-show host Cyndy Garvey and producer-director Garry Marshall.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1999
Seth Shostak, author of "Sharing the Universe: Perspectives on Extraterrestrial Life"; Michael Shermer, author of "How We Believe: The Search for God in an Age of Science"; Yvonne Smith, certified hypnotherapist and abduction researcher; and J. Gordon Melton, director of the Institute for the Study of American Religion will present a panel discussion exploring the question "Are We Alone in the Universe?," Saturday, from noon to 1:30 p.m., prior to the 2:30 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1999 | JAMES E. FOWLER
Dark Delicacies, 3725 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank, (818) 556-6660, has been named the "premiere horror/vampire-oriented bookstore" in America by J. Gordon Melton in his "The Vampire Book," a 900-plus page encyclopedia of all and everything concerning the undead. Melton is a professor at UC Santa Barbara and the head of the Transylvania Society of Dracula's American chapter.
NEWS
December 17, 1988
Distressed over court cases they say involve "infringement of religious liberty," a group of religious figures, attorneys and sociologists declared that American religious bodies are guilty of "moral failure" if they decline to support unconventional religious movements under legal attack.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | JOHN BUZBEE
Local pagans feel right at home amid mainstream holiday rituals when they celebrate the winter solstice on Dec. 21. "Winter solstice is celebrated as a festival of light, just like Christmas and Hanukkah," says "Rhiannon," a Venice musician and the high priestess of a local pagan group called the Circle of Aradia. "The light becomes a symbol of hope that the sun will return."
NEWS
November 30, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
Paul Crouch, a pioneering televangelist who founded Trinity Broadcasting Network, the world's largest Christian TV network, died today, according to the network's website. He was 79. The church reported in October that Crouch had fallen ill and was taken to a Dallas-area hospital while on a visit to a TBN facility in Colleyville, Texas. He had "heart and related health issues," the church said, and he was later returned to California for continued treatment. The son of a Missouri missionary, Crouch moved to California in the early 1960s to manage the movie and television unit of the Assemblies of God. A decade later, after receiving what he believed was a message from God, he began to buy television stations, cable channels and satellites and developed enough Christian programming to sustain a 24-hour network.
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