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J Irwin Miller

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2004 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
J. Irwin Miller, a business leader in Columbus, Ind., whose dedication to fine architecture led to his small city being ranked alongside such architectural giants as Chicago and New York for its innovation and design, has died. He was 95. Miller died Monday at his home in Columbus. No cause of death was given. The scion of a family that had founded a diesel engine company in the early 1900s, Miller had an early interest in architecture.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2004 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
J. Irwin Miller, a business leader in Columbus, Ind., whose dedication to fine architecture led to his small city being ranked alongside such architectural giants as Chicago and New York for its innovation and design, has died. He was 95. Miller died Monday at his home in Columbus. No cause of death was given. The scion of a family that had founded a diesel engine company in the early 1900s, Miller had an early interest in architecture.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A Hong Kong concern said Wednesday that it holds a 9.9% stake in Cummins Engine Co. and will ask the U.S. government for permission to buy as much as 25% of the Columbus, Ind.-based diesel engine maker. The announcement came less than two weeks after founding family members J. Irwin Miller, the 80-year-old retired chairman of Cummins, and his sister, Clementine, paid $72 million, or $5 million above market price, to free Cummins from the uncertainty of a possible takeover by Hanson Industries.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
With mergers and acquisitions sweeping the nation, it was probably only a matter of time before this small town's biggest company, Cummins Engine Co.
BUSINESS
July 30, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
With mergers and acquisitions sweeping the nation, it was probably only a matter of time before this small town's biggest company, Cummins Engine Co.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In a family's commitment to Cummins Engine Co. last week there's a good story about American business, and a lesson or two about investment, too. J. Irwin Miller, the 80-year-old retired chairman of Cummins, and his sister Clementine--descendants of William G. Irwin, the banker who first financed the 70-year-old Columbus, Ind., company--paid $72 million to buy Cummins stock worth $67 million at market price to remove a takeover threat.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
1992 Business Enterprise Awards Announced: The Business Enterprise Trust honored five recipients for making business decisions that both served society and enhanced business by bestowing on them the second annual Business Enterprise Award. The trust, a nonprofit organization founded by Norman Lear, named Gun Denhart, chief executive of children's clothing company Hanna Anderson; five members of Chicago-based Inland Industries; J.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1989 | From the Associated Press
Members of Cummins Engine Co.'s founding family paid $72 million for Hanson PLC's holdings in the company, ending speculation that the British conglomerate might try to take over the diesel-engine maker, officials said Monday. The family members then exchanged the shares with Cummins for $67 million in notes, the officials said. Hanson Industries, the American arm of Hanson, maintained all along that its purchase of 9.79% of Cummins stock was for investment purposes only. J.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atop General Electric's Rockefeller Center on Thursday, the Palo Alto-based Business Enterprise Trust bestowed five awards on an eclectic collection of business innovators at a ceremony that reflected the touch of its founder, film and television producer Norman Lear.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A Hong Kong concern said Wednesday that it holds a 9.9% stake in Cummins Engine Co. and will ask the U.S. government for permission to buy as much as 25% of the Columbus, Ind.-based diesel engine maker. The announcement came less than two weeks after founding family members J. Irwin Miller, the 80-year-old retired chairman of Cummins, and his sister, Clementine, paid $72 million, or $5 million above market price, to free Cummins from the uncertainty of a possible takeover by Hanson Industries.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In a family's commitment to Cummins Engine Co. last week there's a good story about American business, and a lesson or two about investment, too. J. Irwin Miller, the 80-year-old retired chairman of Cummins, and his sister Clementine--descendants of William G. Irwin, the banker who first financed the 70-year-old Columbus, Ind., company--paid $72 million to buy Cummins stock worth $67 million at market price to remove a takeover threat.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1985 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Times Urban Design Critic
The 1985 Pritzker Architecture Prize has been awarded to Hans Hollein, a relatively obscure Austrian designer known as much for his exhibitions and interiors as his architecture. Carrying with it a tax-free grant of $100,000 and a Henry Moore sculpture, the prize is considered the profession's most prestigious award and certainly its most coveted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Balthazar Korab, an architect-turned-photographer with a wide-ranging eye whose moody, polished images captured the spirit of midcentury modern architecture and celebrated its masters, including Eero Saarinen and Mies van der Rohe, died Jan. 15 in Royal Oak, Mich. He was 86. Korab, who lived in Troy, Mich., died after a long period of decline caused by Parkinson's disease and a stroke, said his son, Christian Korab. A refugee from Communist-controlled Hungary, Korab came to the United States in 1955 and found work as a designer in Saarinen's Bloomfield, Mich., office.
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