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J J Cale

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
To anyone familiar with his music, it's tremendously apropos that J.J. Cale has spent the past decade living in a mobile home. While loose and laid-back, Cale's songs--which include the Eric Clapton-covered "After Midnight" and "Cocaine"--are anything but stationary.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
J.J. Cale, the songwriter behind Eric Clapton classics such as “Cocaine” and “After Midnight,” died Friday at the age of 74. The singer-songwriter's official website confirmed Cale passed away at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla after suffering a heart attack Friday night. Born John Weldon Cale in Oklahoma City, he's revered for pioneering the “Tulsa Sound,” a blend of rockabilly, country, jazz and blues. PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2013 Cale, who scored minor solo hits like "Crazy Mama" and "Lies," is better known for tunes like “After Midnight” and “Cocaine” which Clapton covered and turned into smashes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If J.J. Cale wrote recipes instead of songs, each one would call for cooking at a simmer, never a boil. This notoriously laid-back native Oklahoman showed Saturday at the Coach House that, contrary to the hedonistic vow of his most famous song, "After Midnight," a rocker needn't "let it all hang out" to put on a performance that's tasty and full of juice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
J.J. Cale, a laconic, Oklahoma-born musician who shunned the spotlight but gained fame by penning such hits as "After Midnight" and "Cocaine," has died. He was 74. His death from a heart attack Friday at a La Jolla hospital was disclosed on his website and by Mike Kappus, the head of his management agency. In 1970, Cale, a self-taught guitarist, was just scraping by in Tulsa when he heard Eric Clapton on the radio singing "After Midnight. " Four years earlier, Cale had written the song and released it to deafening silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
Having written such songs as "Cocaine," "After Midnight" and "Call Me the Breeze," J.J. Cale is taking it easy these days. After knocking around the music industry since the late '50s, not just as a songwriter but as a guitarist, singer and engineer as well, Cale is wandering around the Southwest in his travel trailer, playing concert dates if and when the mood catches him. It's such a mood that brings him to the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
However much J.J. Cale might protest that his image as a recluse was manufactured by the press, his performances of old did little to dispel that image. In shows only a couple of years ago, the Oklahoman author of "After Midnight" and "Cocaine" might have been playing to a wall instead of an audience for all the acknowledgement he gave the crowd. Between the time he stepped on stage until he left, there often would not be so much as a "hello" or a flicker of eye contact with his fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
J.J. Cale epitomizes the best inferences of the much-maligned term "laid-back," both in his quietly blues-steeped music and in his deadpan but witty personality. The reclusive singer, songwriter and guitarist is as mellow and self-deprecating as they come. Cale, who performs tonight at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, doesn't have much name recognition among the general public, but his is one of the most respected reputations behind the scenes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2009 | Richard Cromelin
J.J. Cale is enjoying his lunch in a corner booth at Olive Garden, cloaked in the anonymity he's taken pains to cultivate throughout his long career in music. But now it looks as if his cover has been blown. A middle-aged woman approaches and introduces herself. He stiffens for an instant, then relaxes. "Oh, I've been talking too loud again," he says with a smile. "Not really," she says. "My husband and I are big fans of Eric Clapton, and I think you co-wrote an album with him . . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
J.J. Cale, the songwriter behind Eric Clapton classics such as “Cocaine” and “After Midnight,” died Friday at the age of 74. The singer-songwriter's official website confirmed Cale passed away at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla after suffering a heart attack Friday night. Born John Weldon Cale in Oklahoma City, he's revered for pioneering the “Tulsa Sound,” a blend of rockabilly, country, jazz and blues. PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2013 Cale, who scored minor solo hits like "Crazy Mama" and "Lies," is better known for tunes like “After Midnight” and “Cocaine” which Clapton covered and turned into smashes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2013 | Steve Chawkins
J.J. Cale, a laconic, Oklahoma-born musician who shunned the spotlight but gained fame by penning such hits as "After Midnight" and "Cocaine," has died. He was 74. His death from a heart attack Friday at a La Jolla hospital was disclosed on his website and by Mike Kappus, the head of his management agency. In 1970, Cale, a self-taught guitarist, was just scraping by in Tulsa when he heard Eric Clapton on the radio singing "After Midnight. " Four years earlier, Cale had written the song and released it to deafening silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2009 | Richard Cromelin
J.J. Cale is enjoying his lunch in a corner booth at Olive Garden, cloaked in the anonymity he's taken pains to cultivate throughout his long career in music. But now it looks as if his cover has been blown. A middle-aged woman approaches and introduces herself. He stiffens for an instant, then relaxes. "Oh, I've been talking too loud again," he says with a smile. "Not really," she says. "My husband and I are big fans of Eric Clapton, and I think you co-wrote an album with him . . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If J.J. Cale wrote recipes instead of songs, each one would call for cooking at a simmer, never a boil. This notoriously laid-back native Oklahoman showed Saturday at the Coach House that, contrary to the hedonistic vow of his most famous song, "After Midnight," a rocker needn't "let it all hang out" to put on a performance that's tasty and full of juice.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1996 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
J.J. Cale epitomizes the best inferences of the much-maligned term "laid-back," both in his quietly blues-steeped music and in his deadpan but witty personality. The reclusive singer, songwriter and guitarist is as mellow and self-deprecating as they come. Cale, who performs tonight at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano, doesn't have much name recognition among the general public, but his is one of the most respected reputations behind the scenes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
However much J.J. Cale might protest that his image as a recluse was manufactured by the press, his performances of old did little to dispel that image. In shows only a couple of years ago, the Oklahoman author of "After Midnight" and "Cocaine" might have been playing to a wall instead of an audience for all the acknowledgement he gave the crowd. Between the time he stepped on stage until he left, there often would not be so much as a "hello" or a flicker of eye contact with his fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
To anyone familiar with his music, it's tremendously apropos that J.J. Cale has spent the past decade living in a mobile home. While loose and laid-back, Cale's songs--which include the Eric Clapton-covered "After Midnight" and "Cocaine"--are anything but stationary.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1989 | Kathie Jenkins \f7 PH, TED ENGELBART
Chaya Brasserie, 8741 Alden Dr., Los Angeles. (213) 859-8833. Style : Big deal eclectic bistro with a special late-supper menu between 11 and 12:30. Setting : Rustic Japanese. Recommended dishes : Spicy seafood spring rolls; tuna tartare; smoked chicken salad. Cost per person, food only : $10-$25 Cocola, 410 Boyd St., Los Angeles. (213) 680-0756. Style : This high-tech watering hole for the artsy set doesn't close its doors until 2 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1989 | Kathie Jenkins \f7 PH, TED ENGELBART
Chaya Brasserie, 8741 Alden Dr., Los Angeles. (213) 859-8833. Style : Big deal eclectic bistro with a special late-supper menu between 11 and 12:30. Setting : Rustic Japanese. Recommended dishes : Spicy seafood spring rolls; tuna tartare; smoked chicken salad. Cost per person, food only : $10-$25 Cocola, 410 Boyd St., Los Angeles. (213) 680-0756. Style : This high-tech watering hole for the artsy set doesn't close its doors until 2 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1992 | STEVE HOCHMAN
*** Spiritualized, "Lazer Guided Melodies," RCA. Jason Pierce, formerly of the English pre-rave tranceters Spacemen 3, surpasses that influential band with this rich, multifaceted yet coherent collection of fulfilled ideas, ranging from a techno-pop rewrite of J. J. Cale's "They Call Me the Breeze" to calmly mesmerizing stretches of drifting-in-space feedback. Albums are rated on a scale of one asterisk (poor) to four (excellent).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
Having written such songs as "Cocaine," "After Midnight" and "Call Me the Breeze," J.J. Cale is taking it easy these days. After knocking around the music industry since the late '50s, not just as a songwriter but as a guitarist, singer and engineer as well, Cale is wandering around the Southwest in his travel trailer, playing concert dates if and when the mood catches him. It's such a mood that brings him to the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano tonight.
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