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J J Jackson

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June 14, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anyone who was a music fan 20 years ago remembers J.J. Jackson beaming from the television set as one of MTV's original VJs. Many others know him from his three decades on the airwaves for Los Angeles rock stations. So, steeped in a background of rock 'n' roll, how did he end up spinning smooth-jazz discs at the Wave, KTWV-FM (94.7)? Well, they just called and asked him. "I was incredibly surprised," said Jackson, who starts Monday as the station's afternoon drive-time disc jockey.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
J.J. Jackson, a longtime Los Angeles rock-radio personality who made pop culture history more than two decades ago as one of the original MTV VJs, has died. He was 62. Jackson died of an apparent heart attack Wednesday in Los Angeles, according to friends and former business associates. "J.J. Jackson's deep passion for music, his ease and good humor on air, and his welcoming style really set the tone for the early days of MTV," MTV officials said in a statement released Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
J.J. Jackson, a longtime Los Angeles rock-radio personality who made pop culture history more than two decades ago as one of the original MTV VJs, has died. He was 62. Jackson died of an apparent heart attack Wednesday in Los Angeles, according to friends and former business associates. "J.J. Jackson's deep passion for music, his ease and good humor on air, and his welcoming style really set the tone for the early days of MTV," MTV officials said in a statement released Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2002 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anyone who was a music fan 20 years ago remembers J.J. Jackson beaming from the television set as one of MTV's original VJs. Many others know him from his three decades on the airwaves for Los Angeles rock stations. So, steeped in a background of rock 'n' roll, how did he end up spinning smooth-jazz discs at the Wave, KTWV-FM (94.7)? Well, they just called and asked him. "I was incredibly surprised," said Jackson, who starts Monday as the station's afternoon drive-time disc jockey.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1986 | Patrick Goldstein
Changing of the guard at MTV. Martha Quinn, perhaps MTV's best-known veejay over the past five years, is leaving the video channel Dec. 31, an MTV spokeswoman has confirmed. According to MTV sources, Quinn's contract is up at the end of the year and won't be renewed. "There's no animosity and we've had a great association," the spokeswoman added. "But Martha's been here for a long time and we're looking to evolve and bring in some new faces."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 1989
I just finished reading Randy Lewis' article "Bringing Back the 'Edge' to Rock Radio," (May 28) and I couldn't agree more! Since radio station KEDG's untimely demise (sellout), I find myself listening less and less to FM radio. KEDG's music format and DJs were great. It was so refreshing to listen to a radio station with intelligent and approachable, real people running the show, rather than boring "radio personalities" playing what they are told by a soul-less computer. Please keep us informed as to where J.J. Jackson and crew finally end up, because that's where I'll set the button on my radio.
SPORTS
April 14, 1992
Adam Peterson of Orange, the top-seeded player in the boys' 18s division, needed four match points to defeat Mashiska Washington of Swartz Creek, Mich., 7-5, 4-6, 7-5, Monday in the first round of the 25th Easter Bowl Junior Tennis Championships. Peterson's booming serve gave him a 6-5 lead, but with Washington serving at 40-15 hoping to get into a tiebreaker, Peterson won four consecutive points for the break and match. Unseeded David Roditi of San Clemente lost to fifth-seeded J.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989 | RANDY LEWIS
New Orleans' second-favorite (to the Neville Brothers) sons attempt to spice up the commercial ingredient in their white-soul/bar-band/blues gumbo, with less-than-finger-lickin' results most of the time. Instead of moving toward the elegant, contemporary blues of a Robert Cray or the fiery blues-rock of a Mason Ruffner, the Radiators land facelessly smack dab in the middle of mainstream rock. On the title tune the band locks into an infectious, rolling rhythm worthy of a Crescent City street parade, and they turn in a solid version of J.J. Jackson's 1966 hit "But It's Alright."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1989
Here I am: a college-educated professional in what's usually described as "the affluent Westside." A desirable listener/consumer, one would think. Yet, once more, I'm being ignored by the business interests of commercial radio. Because I have no patience for the archaic, the banal or the puerile, I had no radio "home" until KEDG's J.J. Jackson (and the cadre of deejays he assembled) put music on the air that I could listen to without punching the channel selector every 30 seconds in frustration.
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