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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
J. J. JOHNSON "Vivian" Concord Jazz * * * * J. J. Johnson's supremacy remains unsurpassed. While other innovative artists have come and gone, Johnson--the first trombonist to play be-bop----still heads the pack. The values that emerged during the be-bop era of the 1940s remain in full force here, as the leader focuses mainly on a well-chosen set of ballads. Johnson's sound, phrasing and concept are well displayed as he assesses the works of Gershwin, Berlin and Porter.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J.J. Johnson, a singular figure in jazz whose innovative trombone play in the bebop era expanded the boundaries of his instrument, died Sunday in Indianapolis. He was 77. In ill health for several months, Johnson committed suicide, according to a report from the local sheriff. An excellent composer and arranger as well as an extraordinary musician, Johnson's career spanned six decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
In this live set recorded at the famed Village Vanguard in New York City, the master of be-bop slide trombone proves he remains worthy of that mantle on his first release as a bandleader in almost a decade. As he has since his debut in the late '40s, Johnson here displays his substantial musicality, including his big yet bright sound, unflappable rhythmic sense and gift for melody.
SPORTS
August 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Miami Dolphin running back J.J. Johnson won't be suspended for violating the NFL's steroid policy, the league said Thursday. Johnson faced a possible suspension for the first four regular-season games, pending an appeal, a source familiar with the case said Monday. He apparently won that appeal. The NFL issued a statement Thursday saying reports are not true that Johnson would be suspended. The league would not elaborate and declined to say whether Johnson's appeal had been upheld.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | Don Heckman
When J.J. Johnson stands up to play, people listen. His warm, furry tone and crisp improvisations are among the most identifiable sounds in all of jazz. An admired and influential jazz player for nearly five decades, he was one of the first to master the tricky rhythms and complex harmonies of bebop in the mid-'40s. And, amazingly, he's done it all on an instrument that seems in recent years to have been relegated to the nether reaches of jazz: the trombone.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
J. J. Johnson, active mainly as a studio composer in recent years, made a rare playing appearance Saturday at the Loa, where the capacity house accorded him the very warm welcome he deserved. As a young trombonist in the bebop era, Johnson managed to adapt this technically demanding horn to the values that had been established by Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Whatever happened to the jazz trombone? This may seem like a loaded question, unfair to those who still practice their profession on this horn; yet it is undeniable that trombonists are no longer in the forefront of the scene. For every youngster who decided to take up this difficult instrument, there must be a hundred who pick up a guitar, learn a few chords and rush headlong into a career. Among the Swing Era and post-swing giants, long gone are Tommy Dorsey and Jack Teagarden.
SPORTS
August 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Miami Dolphin running back J.J. Johnson won't be suspended for violating the NFL's steroid policy, the league said Thursday. Johnson faced a possible suspension for the first four regular-season games, pending an appeal, a source familiar with the case said Monday. He apparently won that appeal. The NFL issued a statement Thursday saying reports are not true that Johnson would be suspended. The league would not elaborate and declined to say whether Johnson's appeal had been upheld.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J.J. Johnson, a singular figure in jazz whose innovative trombone play in the bebop era expanded the boundaries of his instrument, died Sunday in Indianapolis. He was 77. In ill health for several months, Johnson committed suicide, according to a report from the local sheriff. An excellent composer and arranger as well as an extraordinary musician, Johnson's career spanned six decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
Everything worth doing right takes time, even for someone as gifted as J. J. Johnson. The undisputed father of modern jazz trombone, Johnson about a year ago decided to put down his pen and pick up his horn full-time--he'd spent about 20 years writing for, and playing in, the studios--and it's taken him a year to get back on track. The set Johnson delivered Tuesday at Catalina Bar & Grill was the kind one would expect to hear from a reigning jazz master.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996 | Don Heckman
When J.J. Johnson stands up to play, people listen. His warm, furry tone and crisp improvisations are among the most identifiable sounds in all of jazz. An admired and influential jazz player for nearly five decades, he was one of the first to master the tricky rhythms and complex harmonies of bebop in the mid-'40s. And, amazingly, he's done it all on an instrument that seems in recent years to have been relegated to the nether reaches of jazz: the trombone.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The lineup for the 18th annual Playboy Jazz Festival at the Hollywood Bowl on June 15 and 16 has some new faces, old faces, a few surprises and one unanswered question. The program, announced today, includes such major jazz names as trombonist J.J. Johnson, saxophonists Wayne Shorter and Joe Lovano, bassist Stanley Clarke, singers Tony Bennett, Dianne Reeves and Gladys Knight and contemporary groups Fourplay and the Yellowjackets.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
J. J. JOHNSON "Vivian" Concord Jazz * * * * J. J. Johnson's supremacy remains unsurpassed. While other innovative artists have come and gone, Johnson--the first trombonist to play be-bop----still heads the pack. The values that emerged during the be-bop era of the 1940s remain in full force here, as the leader focuses mainly on a well-chosen set of ballads. Johnson's sound, phrasing and concept are well displayed as he assesses the works of Gershwin, Berlin and Porter.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
In this live set recorded at the famed Village Vanguard in New York City, the master of be-bop slide trombone proves he remains worthy of that mantle on his first release as a bandleader in almost a decade. As he has since his debut in the late '40s, Johnson here displays his substantial musicality, including his big yet bright sound, unflappable rhythmic sense and gift for melody.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
Everything worth doing right takes time, even for someone as gifted as J. J. Johnson. The undisputed father of modern jazz trombone, Johnson about a year ago decided to put down his pen and pick up his horn full-time--he'd spent about 20 years writing for, and playing in, the studios--and it's taken him a year to get back on track. The set Johnson delivered Tuesday at Catalina Bar & Grill was the kind one would expect to hear from a reigning jazz master.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
Whatever happened to the jazz trombone? This may seem like a loaded question, unfair to those who still practice their profession on this horn; yet it is undeniable that trombonists are no longer in the forefront of the scene. For every youngster who decided to take up this difficult instrument, there must be a hundred who pick up a guitar, learn a few chords and rush headlong into a career. Among the Swing Era and post-swing giants, long gone are Tommy Dorsey and Jack Teagarden.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The lineup for the 18th annual Playboy Jazz Festival at the Hollywood Bowl on June 15 and 16 has some new faces, old faces, a few surprises and one unanswered question. The program, announced today, includes such major jazz names as trombonist J.J. Johnson, saxophonists Wayne Shorter and Joe Lovano, bassist Stanley Clarke, singers Tony Bennett, Dianne Reeves and Gladys Knight and contemporary groups Fourplay and the Yellowjackets.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1996
I wonder why Bill Kohlhaase, in his review of Sunday's Playboy Jazz Festival ("Getting Back in the Swing," June 18), complimented J.J. Johnson's presentation of "standards" then dismissed Gladys Knight for rehashing her hits? To fans of pop and soul music, Knight's hits are standards, too--standards she delivered at the Bowl with her customary energy and authority. Indeed Knight's set was "crowd-pleasing"--so pleasing in fact that she received a standing ovation of at least 60 seconds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
J. J. Johnson, active mainly as a studio composer in recent years, made a rare playing appearance Saturday at the Loa, where the capacity house accorded him the very warm welcome he deserved. As a young trombonist in the bebop era, Johnson managed to adapt this technically demanding horn to the values that had been established by Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker.
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