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J J Snack Foods Corp

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BUSINESS
July 19, 1987
ICEE-USA, the Anaheim-based maker of flavored slush drinks, said that it will borrow $4 million from J&J Snack Foods Corp. The loan is in exchange for a subordinated five-year note that will convert into 666,667 ICEE common shares valued at $6 each. Also, ICEE will issue the Pennsauken, N.J.-based maker of snack foods warrants to buy an additional 200,000 shares at $6 each.
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BUSINESS
May 16, 2000 | Reuters
J & J Snack Foods Corp. said that it is voluntarily recalling 300,000 boxes of Minute Maid brand frozen juice bars because some packages contain "food-grade plastic particles" that could cause choking. J & J Snack said the recall will hurt earnings for its fiscal year 2000, ending in September. The recall affects 12-packs of orange, cherry and grape Minute Maid Frozen Juice Bars produced at the company's Scranton, Pa., plant.
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BUSINESS
May 16, 2000 | Reuters
J & J Snack Foods Corp. said that it is voluntarily recalling 300,000 boxes of Minute Maid brand frozen juice bars because some packages contain "food-grade plastic particles" that could cause choking. J & J Snack said the recall will hurt earnings for its fiscal year 2000, ending in September. The recall affects 12-packs of orange, cherry and grape Minute Maid Frozen Juice Bars produced at the company's Scranton, Pa., plant.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1987
ICEE-USA, the Anaheim-based maker of flavored slush drinks, said that it will borrow $4 million from J&J Snack Foods Corp. The loan is in exchange for a subordinated five-year note that will convert into 666,667 ICEE common shares valued at $6 each. Also, ICEE will issue the Pennsauken, N.J.-based maker of snack foods warrants to buy an additional 200,000 shares at $6 each.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1987 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
A New Jersey food company has bought a 43.3% stake in ICEE-USA for $3.4 million as part of its plan to gain control of the Anaheim maker and marketer of the popular ICEE brand flavored slush drinks. J&J Snack Foods Investment Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of J&J Snack Foods Corp., bought out ICEE's major shareholder and board chairman, A. Walter Rognlien, according to a public report filed Monday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Rognlien and his Runglin Co. Inc.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1988 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
A New Jersey specialty foods company that began buying stock in ICEE-USA last year has acquired its remaining shares in a $2.4-million transaction and has turned the Anaheim slush drink maker into one of its subsidiaries. J&J Snack Foods Corp. of Pennsauken, N.J., acquired the final 28% of ICEE's shares last week at a special meeting of ICEE shareholders, said Arnold J. Goldstein, J&J senior vice president and chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
August 2, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The fact that Paul Newman's face is now smiling from the front of a pretzel bag is a sign of just how far the pretzel has come. These days, there's dough to be made in pretzels. Besides Newman, whose Newman's Own company recently began marketing "organic" pretzels, a slew of marketers--from tiny start-ups to the snack food giants--have caught pretzelmania. And soft-pretzel franchises, which sell fresh-baked pretzels for about $1.50 a pop, are giving Mrs.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2006 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
Moviegoers tend to stuff themselves full of salty popcorn and sweet candy. When people start steering clear of the multiplex -- as audiences have done for three straight years -- the manufacturers of those theater snacks are the ones left with a sour taste in their mouths. Much has been made of how declining movie admissions and box-office grosses have clipped the earnings of movie studios and film exhibitors.
FOOD
May 25, 1989 | DANIEL P. PUZO, Times Staff Writer
Consumers can expect little in the way of innovative new food products in the coming months, according to a leading industry analyst. Spiraling development costs as well as increasingly high fees charged by supermarket chains for access to shelf space are reasons for the drop, said Martin Friedman, editor of Gorman's New Product News, a Chicago-based trade journal. Adding to manufacturers' timidity is that several promising items brought to market last year did poorly, he said.
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