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J K Jain

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November 11, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time DrK. Jain's Video Chariots came blaring into the remote, backward villages of south India earlier this year, many in his largely illiterate audience thought they were watching black magic. The villagers had no electricity. They still made furrows in the fields with their bare feet, and their idea of irrigation was praying to the Hindu rain god. Many had never even heard of television, and, certainly, none knew a TV screen could be the size of a truck.
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NEWS
November 11, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first time DrK. Jain's Video Chariots came blaring into the remote, backward villages of south India earlier this year, many in his largely illiterate audience thought they were watching black magic. The villagers had no electricity. They still made furrows in the fields with their bare feet, and their idea of irrigation was praying to the Hindu rain god. Many had never even heard of television, and, certainly, none knew a TV screen could be the size of a truck.
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NEWS
January 19, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Already, some are calling it India's Watergate. But in this subcontinental version of the American political scandal of the century, politicians from both leading parties have been implicated. With nationwide elections only three months away in India, a messy and widening probe into high-level official corruption has shaken the usually smug ruling circles of the world's largest democracy with the punch of a monsoon thunderclap.
NEWS
May 28, 1987 | RONE TEMPEST, Times Staff Writer
As political cartoons go, it was fairly mild. "A harmless, innocent joke," the man who published it said. It appeared on the cover of Ananda Vikadan, a popular Tamil-language weekly magazine, and it showed two greasy-haired, shifty-eyed men seated on a stage. A man in the audience, speaking to a friend, provided the caption: "The one who looks like a pickpocket is a state assemblyman. The one who looks like an armed robber is a state minister."
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an ultramodern control room in the south suburbs of New Delhi on Saturday, the video wizards of Jain Studios unveiled their latest creation: a post-assassination campaign video for the powerful Hindu revivalist Bharatiya Janata Party. It includes a color-photo re-creation of Rajiv Gandhi's assassination and the assertion that Gandhi's Congress-I Party was the sole cause of the politics of violence that destroyed its own leader.
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