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September 27, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying strict new federal sentencing guidelines had taken much of the fun out of his job, U.S. District Court Judge J. Lawrence Irving announced Wednesday he is leaving the bench. Irving, 55, who has drawn a succession of high-profile cases, including financier Richard T. Silberman's recently concluded money-laundering case, said he plans to notify President Bush today that he will resign effective Dec. 31.
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NEWS
September 27, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying strict new federal sentencing guidelines had taken much of the fun out of his job, U.S. District Court Judge J. Lawrence Irving announced Wednesday he is leaving the bench. Irving, 55, who has drawn a succession of high-profile cases, including financier Richard T. Silberman's recently concluded money-laundering case, said he plans to notify President Bush today that he will resign effective Dec. 31.
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NEWS
September 27, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying strict new federal sentencing guidelines had taken much of the fun out of being a judge, U.S. District Judge J. Lawrence Irving announced Wednesday that he is leaving the bench. Irving, 55, who has drawn a succession of high-profile cases, including financier Richard T. Silberman's just-concluded money-laundering case, said he planned to notify President Bush today that he will resign as of Dec. 31 because of the new sentencing rules.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying strict new federal sentencing guidelines had taken much of the fun out of being a judge, U.S. District Judge J. Lawrence Irving announced Wednesday that he is leaving the bench. Irving, 55, who has drawn a succession of high-profile cases, including financier Richard T. Silberman's just-concluded money-laundering case, said he planned to notify President Bush today that he will resign as of Dec. 31 because of the new sentencing rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From a phone at a hotel in San Diego's Mission Valley, reputed mobster Chris Petti reached out on Dec. 5, 1988, and touched prominent San Diego businessman Richard T. Silberman. Though the telephone was a public pay phone, it had been tapped--by FBI agents. In the phone conversation, Petti and Silberman chatted about laundering money they believed came from Colombian drug lords, federal prosecutors say. "The thing that was bad about the deal is it was too small. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1989
A federal judge Tuesday ordered attorneys for the Immigration and Naturalization Service and advocates for farm-worker amnesty applicants to work out a compromise on a lawsuit filed against Border Patrol agents who have illegally seized documents from dozens of migrant workers. U.S. District Judge J. Lawrence Irving ordered INS attorney Charles Hamilton and Stephen Rosenbaum, a lawyer with the California Rural Legal Assistance, to reach a compromise by April 24.
NEWS
December 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Former British track star David Jenkins was sentenced today to seven years in federal prison and fined $75,000 for his role in an international steroid-smuggling ring. Jenkins, 36, a member of Britain's Olympic silver medal-winning 400-meter relay team in 1972, was ordered into custody immediately after U.S. District Judge J. Lawrence Irving pronounced sentence. Jenkins, of Del Mar, Calif.
NEWS
May 2, 1989
A San Diego County prosecutor's son was sentenced to 11 years in prison for bank robbery. John Hewicker III, 25, sobbed quietly as U.S. District Judge J. Lawrence Irving pronounced the punishment in San Diego. Defense attorney Ramon Castro told Irving that his client had unresolved emotional problems and "was crying for help" when he committed the robberies. Irving sentenced Hewicker to six years in prison for the Dec. 2 robbery of a Home Federal Savings & Loan branch in which $800 was taken and the Dec. 16 robbery of a Flagship Federal Savings & Loan in which $250 was stolen.
SPORTS
November 7, 1987 | Associated Press
Former British track star David Jenkins pleaded guilty Friday to taking part in a multimillion-dollar steroid smuggling ring. He made the plea in exchange for a prosecutor's promise to seek a maximum prison term of 10 years. However, U.S. District Court Judge J. Lawrence Irving cautioned Jenkins that by admitting to four felony counts, he was vulnerable to a maximum sentence under the law: 16 years in prison and a $1-million fine.
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