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J Leland Atwood

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March 8, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. Leland "Lee" Atwood, the former head of North American Rockwell Corp. who spearheaded the development of innovative aircraft from the World War II P-51 Mustang fighter to the space shuttle, has died. He was 94. Atwood, former president and chief executive of North American Aviation Inc., which later merged with Rockwell and is now a part of Boeing Co., died Friday at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica, the company said Sunday.
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NEWS
March 8, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. Leland "Lee" Atwood, the former head of North American Rockwell Corp. who spearheaded the development of innovative aircraft from the World War II P-51 Mustang fighter to the space shuttle, has died. He was 94. Atwood, former president and chief executive of North American Aviation Inc., which later merged with Rockwell and is now a part of Boeing Co., died Friday at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica, the company said Sunday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1994
As a once-qualified structural engineer, I was intrigued and somewhat appalled by the article "Steel-Frame Building Cracks Spur Wider Damage Fears" (Feb. 27). Admittedly, it may not be possible to predict the magnitude, displacement and rate of application of earthquake forces with any accuracy, but I could wonder if the lateral forces that are actually designed for are really taken seriously. If the illustration is representative, it seems to me that the vertical and static loads and weights are well provided for in the classic rigid corner frame design.
NEWS
June 1, 1986 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Julian Ganz Jr. and the trustees of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Dr. Armand Hammer are inviting guests for a preview reception of the exhibition, "Impressionist to Early Modern Paintings from the U.S.S.R." on June 25 at the museum. Works from the Hermitage Museum, Leningrad, and the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow, will be exhibited. The effort is a cooperative endeavor of the Ministry of Culture of the U.S.S.R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur E. Raymond, the Douglas Aircraft engineer who helped revolutionize commercial air travel as the principal designer of the DC-3, died Monday at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica. He was 99 and lived in Bel-Air. The DC-3 was the country's first reliable passenger plane, known as the workhorse of aviation for its indestructibility. More than 50 years later, as many as 2,000 of the original 11,000 planes are still in use around the world.
NEWS
October 27, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
Aerospace pioneer J. Leland Atwood, who we're told is responsible for the design of more flying machines than anyone (among his creations are the P-51 Mustang, the B-25 Mitchell bomber and the F-86 Sabrejet) will receive special kudos from the Los Angeles chapter of the ARCS (Achievement Rewards for College Scientists) Foundation. It will happen Nov. 4 when the local ARCS celebrate another successful year of doing and fund raising with a luncheon in the Music Center's Grand Hall.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Thank goodness for Los Angeles' cause-makers and volunteers. They never stop. Well, maybe for a bite of turkey. Sometimes, not even that. On Wednesday the Rev. Mark Holsinger, director of the Los Angeles Mission, gathered the likes of Cloris Leachman, Ed Begley Jr. and Jeff Bridges for Hollywood dressing while serving turkey, pie and trimmings to about 3,500 homeless men, women and children.
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