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May 18, 1999 | MARK SAYLOR
After 25 years of selling movie rights to markets around the world, Julia Palau has quietly emerged as one of the most powerful women in the independent film business. Palau, majority owner and CEO of J&M Entertainment, the London-based company she co-founded in 1978, is in the rare ranks of those movie executives who personally have the authority to green-light a slate of movies. Yet she is little known in the United States.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1999 | MARK SAYLOR
After 25 years of selling movie rights to markets around the world, Julia Palau has quietly emerged as one of the most powerful women in the independent film business. Palau, majority owner and CEO of J&M Entertainment, the London-based company she co-founded in 1978, is in the rare ranks of those movie executives who personally have the authority to green-light a slate of movies. Yet she is little known in the United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After "Rock-a-Doodle," "Cool World" and "Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland," it's clear that 1992 is not a vintage year for animation, but it's been a long time since a cartoon feature as thoroughly terrible as "Freddie as F.R.O.7." (citywide) has appeared. This 21-gun stinker makes Saturday-morning television look good. The improbable story is so full of gaps, it's difficult to believe writer-producer-director Jon Acevski ever read his own screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1993 | CHRIS WILLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you ever hungered to see a close-up of pop star Phil Collins laughing maniacally with his mouth full of chewy hamburger, then "Frauds" (at the Sunset 5) is the in-your-face movie for you. This exercise in overstylized zaniness has enough wide-angle mug shots to populate a whole apartment building's worth of peepholes. What we're peeping at here is a self-consciously oddball Australian thriller-comedy: "Double Indemnity" as remade by Tim Burton, or something unholy like that.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"An American Werewolf in Paris" is a painfully anemic variation on John Landis' 1981 winner, "An American Werewolf in London." While the original had both wit and poignancy--and an affectionate and knowing tip-of-the-hat to werewolf movies past--this slapdash, silly new edition is so cut-rate it has Luxembourg and Amsterdam standing in for the City of Light. Only the least discriminating segment of the "Scream 2" audience need bother.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Line Cinema had planned to release "Theodore Rex," a film pairing Whoopi Goldberg with an animatronic dinosaur, last Friday--four days after her critically acclaimed turn hosting the Academy Awards. But the date came and went with no "Theodore Rex," which New Line says is now headed for TV or home video after an unsuccessful test-market theatrical run. The $33.5-million family comedy becomes one of the most expensive films in memory to virtually bypass the nation's cinemas.
NEWS
June 17, 2004 | Jeff Miller, Special to The Times
"Man, when are you going to change this song? You're ruining my pimp game!" The dance floor is packed with sweaty, swinging bodies. The DJ is spinning a smash. The speaker isn't a Gucci-wearing club hopper at Garden of Eden. I'm the DJ. It's Thursday at 1:30 p.m. I'm at an elementary school in Culver City. The hit song is "The Chicken Dance." And the speaker -- well, he's in 5th grade. Welcome to the bizarre world of the graduation dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1997 | SHEARLEAN DUKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The only temperamental actor on the set was the film's aging star: a 30-year-old ambulance with a psychedelic paint job and a broken transmission. This star has no lines but is nonetheless essential to the story. After all, what is a road picture without a car?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, Mary Williams Walsh is The Times' correspondent in Canada
Ten years ago, Laurel Phelan was an unextraordinary young professional, working 9-to-5 as an accountant for a Vancouver oil company and training when she could for a life as a coloratura on the local opera scene. But then one night began a series of recurrent nightmares--blood-soaked dreams that today seem destined to hurl Phelan down an unexpected path to Hollywood success.
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