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NEWS
November 14, 1989 | Associated Press
An elections official said Monday that her staff will go over returns "with a fine-toothed comb" before certifying the outcome of the governor's race, in which Democatic Lt. Gov. L. Douglas Wilder apparently defeated Republican J. Marshall Coleman. Susan Fitz-Hugh, secretary of the electoral board, said the state's 136 localities have finished canvassing the Nov. 7 balloting for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, the House of Delegates and local offices and referenda.
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NEWS
June 15, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Sen. Charles S. Robb won renomination in the Virginia Democratic primary Tuesday, and plunged into a four-way contest for his seat that is already sending tremors across the national political landscape. With 100% of the precincts reporting, Robb had 154,524 votes, or 58%; state Sen. Virgil H. Goode Jr. had 90,531, or 34%; Richmond lawyer Sylvia Clute had 17,096, or 6%, and Lyndon H. LaRouche Jr. follower Nancy Spannaus had 4,505, or 2%.
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NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Democrat L. Douglas Wilder's election as governor was certified Monday but J. Marshall Coleman, his Republican opponent, asked for a recount and also requested an investigation of alleged irregularities at the polls. Coleman made his announcement about three hours before the state Board of Elections reported the returns as 897,139 votes for Wilder to 890,285 for Coleman--a margin of 6,854 votes, or about 0.38% of the nearly 1.8 million votes cast.
NEWS
November 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
Democrat L. Douglas Wilder's election as governor was certified Monday but J. Marshall Coleman, his Republican opponent, asked for a recount and also requested an investigation of alleged irregularities at the polls. Coleman made his announcement about three hours before the state Board of Elections reported the returns as 897,139 votes for Wilder to 890,285 for Coleman--a margin of 6,854 votes, or about 0.38% of the nearly 1.8 million votes cast.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
Republican J. Marshall Coleman said Wednesday that he intends to seek a recount of the closest governor's race in Virginia history, but Democrat L. Douglas Wilder was already relishing the historical dimensions of his apparent victory. "It starts coming home to you, something happened last night," Wilder said at a news conference the morning after he claimed victory as the nation's first black elected governor. Wilder was clinging to a lead of 5,500 votes out of more than 1.7 million cast.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democrat David N. Dinkins became New York City's first black mayor by defeating Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani on Tuesday, while Democrat L. Douglas Wilder, a grandson of slaves, claimed the Virginia governorship in a close contest with Republican J. Marshall Coleman. The apparent victory for Wilder, now Virginia's lieutenant governor, would make him the first black to win election as a governor in U.S. history.
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Sen. Charles S. Robb won renomination in the Virginia Democratic primary Tuesday, and plunged into a four-way contest for his seat that is already sending tremors across the national political landscape. With 100% of the precincts reporting, Robb had 154,524 votes, or 58%; state Sen. Virgil H. Goode Jr. had 90,531, or 34%; Richmond lawyer Sylvia Clute had 17,096, or 6%, and Lyndon H. LaRouche Jr. follower Nancy Spannaus had 4,505, or 2%.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking out over a cheering crowd of black and white supporters, L. Douglas Wilder declared Tuesday night that he had become the nation's first elected black governor, even though nearly complete returns showed he held only a slender lead. He made no reference to the historic nature of his strong showing, saying only that the message sent was that "negative campaigns work everywhere but in Virginia."
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ronald Spiggle, Democratic county chairman in Appomattox County, Va., has not voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since 1980. But he plans to vote for the party's gubernatorial nominee, Douglas Wilder, on Nov. 7. What's more, Spiggle is confident that Wilder, a black, will carry Appomattox County, where the war between the states ended. The county went for George Bush by 2 to 1 last November. "Most people think he's a moderate who will keep the state programs going," Spiggle says.
NEWS
June 14, 1994 | Associated Press
Former GOP state Atty. Gen. J. Marshall Coleman filed to run for the U.S. Senate as an independent Monday, saying voters are fed up with Democratic Sen. Charles S. Robb and Republican nominee Oliver L. North. Voters "are very disillusioned and dissatisfied and disheartened by the choices of candidates that both political parties are putting forward," Coleman told reporters.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | Associated Press
An elections official said Monday that her staff will go over returns "with a fine-toothed comb" before certifying the outcome of the governor's race, in which Democatic Lt. Gov. L. Douglas Wilder apparently defeated Republican J. Marshall Coleman. Susan Fitz-Hugh, secretary of the electoral board, said the state's 136 localities have finished canvassing the Nov. 7 balloting for governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, the House of Delegates and local offices and referenda.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
Republican J. Marshall Coleman said Wednesday that he intends to seek a recount of the closest governor's race in Virginia history, but Democrat L. Douglas Wilder was already relishing the historical dimensions of his apparent victory. "It starts coming home to you, something happened last night," Wilder said at a news conference the morning after he claimed victory as the nation's first black elected governor. Wilder was clinging to a lead of 5,500 votes out of more than 1.7 million cast.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking out over a cheering crowd of black and white supporters, L. Douglas Wilder declared Tuesday night that he had become the nation's first elected black governor, even though nearly complete returns showed he held only a slender lead. He made no reference to the historic nature of his strong showing, saying only that the message sent was that "negative campaigns work everywhere but in Virginia."
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Democrat David N. Dinkins became New York City's first black mayor by defeating Republican Rudolph W. Giuliani on Tuesday, while Democrat L. Douglas Wilder, a grandson of slaves, claimed the Virginia governorship in a close contest with Republican J. Marshall Coleman. The apparent victory for Wilder, now Virginia's lieutenant governor, would make him the first black to win election as a governor in U.S. history.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ronald Spiggle, Democratic county chairman in Appomattox County, Va., has not voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since 1980. But he plans to vote for the party's gubernatorial nominee, Douglas Wilder, on Nov. 7. What's more, Spiggle is confident that Wilder, a black, will carry Appomattox County, where the war between the states ended. The county went for George Bush by 2 to 1 last November. "Most people think he's a moderate who will keep the state programs going," Spiggle says.
NEWS
November 27, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Democrat L. Douglas Wilder was certified today as the winner by a whisker--less than half a percentage point--of the closest governor's race in Virginia history. In official returns released by the State Board of Elections, Wilder received 897,139 votes to 890,285 for Republican J. Marshall Coleman out of nearly 1.8 million ballots cast, for a margin of 6,854 votes, or .38%. The unofficial returns from the Nov.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Turnout was heavy today as L. Douglas Wilder's bid to become the nation's first elected black governor went to the voters after a race in which abortion and negative campaigning emerged as major issues. "We're on roller skates," said Alice Lynch, registrar in Richmond, describing the activity in her office. "I think it's going to be a record in Richmond anyway." Wilder, the state's Democratic lieutenant governor, and J.
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