Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJ Marshall Coleman
IN THE NEWS

J Marshall Coleman

ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1989
The elections of Nov. 7 should serve as a warning to President Bush and the Republican Party. Victories by David Dinkins in New York City, James J. Florio in New Jersey and L. Douglas Wilder in Virginia demonstrated that two political strategies President Bush has brought to the forefront of American politics have now exploded in his face. First, the American people do not want the rights of women to choose an abortion to be abridged. The clock will not be turned back.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | BARBARA SLAVIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The back-yard barbecue in a leafy Virginia suburb was half over and the time had come for Oliver L. North, Republican candidate for Senate, to speak. Before jumping into his standard stump speech about the evils of the Washington Establishment he hopes to tangle with for a second time, the former Marine lieutenant colonel and Iran-Contra defendant referred to his wife of 26 years. "Betsy was supposed to be here half an hour ago, but she's operating on Betsy Standard Time," he said.
NEWS
June 6, 1994 | KENT JENKINS JR. and DONALD P. BAKER, THE WASHINGTON POST
One day after Oliver L. North won Virginia's GOP nomination for the U.S. Senate, Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole rained on North's victory celebration by refusing to endorse his fellow Republican and reaching out to potential North opponent J. Marshall Coleman.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Virginia Gov.-elect L. Douglas Wilder told fellow Democrats on Monday they can recapture the White House if they return to "mainstream" politics as he did in becoming the first elected black governor. Appearing before the Democratic Leadership Council's fall conference, Wilder appeared to agree with President Bush's strong stand against new taxes as he outlined a new party strategy for winning national office in 1992. "Americans everywhere want to hold the line on taxes," he said.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder withdrew from the U.S. Senate race in Virginia on Thursday, apparently bowing to the wishes of Democratic leaders convinced that his campaign could boost Republican Oliver L. North's chances to take the seat from incumbent Democrat Charles S. Robb.
NEWS
October 19, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In addition to the record-setting spending in California's Senate race, Virginia's race between Republican Oliver L. North and Democratic Sen. Charles S. Robb may also go into the spending record books. North, who built a huge direct-mail fund-raising network initially to pay for his defense in the trial growing out of the Iran-Contra scandal and then for political purposes, so far has raised $15.1 million, according to Federal Election Commission filings.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the charges, countercharges and remarkably angry tenor of this year's congressional campaigns, nearly three out of four voters say they feel they learned enough about the candidates to make informed choices, according to a new post-election survey of voters.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, who was 0 for 3 in campaigning for Republican candidates on Election Day, 1989, set his sights Monday on the 1990 elections, stumping for Senate and gubernatorial candidates in Illinois and Rhode Island.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
For President Bush, a firm believer in the use of the White House as a "bully pulpit," the search for groups worthy of a presidential salute never ends. On Wednesday, he turned the spotlight on a group of roving environmentalists from San Diego. "A great group of rambling recyclers out there--the San Diego Can Crushers. Let's hear it for the San Diego Can Crushers," Bush declared, in his most presidential style. And when the applause was not to his satisfaction, he added: "Now we can do better than that."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|