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J Mascis

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2000 | LINA LECARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A master of effortless yet complex folk-flavored noise, J Mascis continues to live upto the standard he set with the acclaimed pre-grunge pioneers Dinosaur Jr. with his latest project, J Mascis & the Fog. It's another exercise in alternating chaos and clarity, with spellbinding guitar work laying the foundation for lovely 'n' lazy compositions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2000 | LINA LECARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A master of effortless yet complex folk-flavored noise, J Mascis continues to live upto the standard he set with the acclaimed pre-grunge pioneers Dinosaur Jr. with his latest project, J Mascis & the Fog. It's another exercise in alternating chaos and clarity, with spellbinding guitar work laying the foundation for lovely 'n' lazy compositions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1995 | SANDY MASUO
In the ongoing wave of unplugging by rock performers, some of the most unlikely prospects for acoustic success have yielded the most interesting results. Initially, the idea of Dinosaur Jr. main man J Mascis' performing acoustic interpretations of his thorny, feedback-scorched pop seems absurd--all but his tamest tunes seem too unruly to survive unamplified. But Mascis' acoustic set at McCabe's on Sunday proved the music could not only survive but thrive.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1997 | Sara Scribner
J Mascis, the Thomas Edison of post-punk, rips to shreds all those most-likely-to-retire ballots that have been piling up, delivering his best album since 1991's "Green Mind." The singer's high-pitched mumble remains nearly impossible to decipher, but his sprawling, gargantuan guitar makes up for that. Though mental health is his thematic preoccupation, this album might silence the critics who were wondering about his. Dinosaur Jr. plays the Roxy on May 29.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic. and
It seemed appropriate that Dinosaur Jr., one of the country's most compelling college/alternative rock bands, would pass through Los Angeles on a rare overcast day--this isn't a group that has ever been known for a sunny disposition. The trio's cascading guitar assault often reflects the primal anxiety of a drowning man's last, desperate gasp for air, all set against J Mascis' themes about searching for something or someone to believe in--including a reason to believe in oneself.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1997 | Sara Scribner
J Mascis, the Thomas Edison of post-punk, rips to shreds all those most-likely-to-retire ballots that have been piling up, delivering his best album since 1991's "Green Mind." The singer's high-pitched mumble remains nearly impossible to decipher, but his sprawling, gargantuan guitar makes up for that. Though mental health is his thematic preoccupation, this album might silence the critics who were wondering about his. Dinosaur Jr. plays the Roxy on May 29.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
The mere trickle of new January releases lets us reach back into 1992 for some albums--including Mary J. Blige and Medicine--that were passed over in earlier $50 guides. But stirring new releases by Elvis Costello and Dinosaur Jr. get the 1993 release schedule off to a brisk start. January Mary J. Blige's "What's 411?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1996 | LORRAINE ALI
** J Mascis, "Martin and Me," Reprise. Slacker deluxe J Mascis is the core of indie rock's premier guitar band Dinosaur Jr., a trio heavily inspired by Neil Young's Crazy Horse. Mascis' solo debut is a live acoustic performance, and though it shows off his sweetly enticing songwriting, his shaky voice proves too precious minus the usual woolly guitar distortion behind it, and the music too pared down to frame his heartbroken lyrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1997
Moby, Leftfield, the Chemical Brothers and Danny Saber have all done remixes to freshen up John Lydon's first solo album, "Psycho Path," due in June on Virgin Records. The bulk of the album was recorded three years ago, but held back until last year's Sex Pistols reunion tour was over. In the notes about the songs, Lydon renews his old rivalry with the Clash, identifying them among those who "love to spout rhetoric without understanding a single damn thing they're talking about." . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1995 | SANDY MASUO
In the ongoing wave of unplugging by rock performers, some of the most unlikely prospects for acoustic success have yielded the most interesting results. Initially, the idea of Dinosaur Jr. main man J Mascis' performing acoustic interpretations of his thorny, feedback-scorched pop seems absurd--all but his tamest tunes seem too unruly to survive unamplified. But Mascis' acoustic set at McCabe's on Sunday proved the music could not only survive but thrive.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic.
The mere trickle of new January releases lets us reach back into 1992 for some albums--including Mary J. Blige and Medicine--that were passed over in earlier $50 guides. But stirring new releases by Elvis Costello and Dinosaur Jr. get the 1993 release schedule off to a brisk start. January Mary J. Blige's "What's 411?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic. and
It seemed appropriate that Dinosaur Jr., one of the country's most compelling college/alternative rock bands, would pass through Los Angeles on a rare overcast day--this isn't a group that has ever been known for a sunny disposition. The trio's cascading guitar assault often reflects the primal anxiety of a drowning man's last, desperate gasp for air, all set against J Mascis' themes about searching for something or someone to believe in--including a reason to believe in oneself.
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