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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1989
Federal narcotics agents and the FBI are investigating the possibility that nearly 900 pounds of cocaine found hidden in a truckload of apples in New Jersey came from a warehouse in Sylmar where a record 21.4 tons of the drug was seized recently, authorities said Thursday. "We don't know that the truck drove up to the Sylmar warehouse and left with the load of cocaine," said Ralph Lochridge, spokesman for the federal Drug Enforcement Administration in Los Angeles.
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BUSINESS
November 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Johnson & Johnson warned Wednesday that it might pull out of a $25.4-billion deal to buy Guidant Corp. because of potential liability arising from the medical device maker's sweeping product recalls and a regulatory investigation. But Guidant executives said J&J was legally bound to go through with the deal. "Recent product and communications issues have certainly had an impact on our business in the near term," Guidant Chief Executive Ronald W. Dollens said.
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NATIONAL
January 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
The state Senate voted Thursday to eliminate the poet laureate position after the current title holder refused to resign for writing a poem implying Israel had advance knowledge of the 2001 terrorist attacks. The measure still must pass the Assembly. Current rules say the title cannot be rescinded and the governor and Legislature cannot fire Amiri Baraka, poet laureate since July. Baraka drew criticism after reading his poem "Somebody Blew Up America" at a festival last summer.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Drug maker Johnson & Johnson disclosed in a regulatory filing that the U.S. attorney in Boston wanted to talk to some present and former employees about the marketing of its Topamax epilepsy treatment. The probe started in December 2003 and is looking at how Johnson & Johnson's Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical unit marketed the drug, including alleged "off-label" marketing, the New Brunswick, N.J., company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2001 | WILLIAM BORDEN, REUTERS
Johnson & Johnson, which markets diabetes-care products made by Inverness Medical Technology Inc., said Wednesday that it's in talks to buy the business from Inverness for about $1.3 billion in hopes of regaining market leadership in blood sugar monitors. The health-care giant said that as part of the deal, Inverness would spin off its non-diabetes businesses--women's health, nutritional supplements and clinical diagnostics--to form a publicly traded company owned by Inverness shareholders.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Drug maker Johnson & Johnson disclosed in a regulatory filing that the U.S. attorney in Boston wanted to talk to some present and former employees about the marketing of its Topamax epilepsy treatment. The probe started in December 2003 and is looking at how Johnson & Johnson's Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical unit marketed the drug, including alleged "off-label" marketing, the New Brunswick, N.J., company said in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Johnson & Johnson warned Wednesday that it might pull out of a $25.4-billion deal to buy Guidant Corp. because of potential liability arising from the medical device maker's sweeping product recalls and a regulatory investigation. But Guidant executives said J&J was legally bound to go through with the deal. "Recent product and communications issues have certainly had an impact on our business in the near term," Guidant Chief Executive Ronald W. Dollens said.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | BILL BILLITER
He is tall, slim, boyish-looking. Although he is 36, Huntington Beach Mayor Thomas J. Mays could easily pass for a college graduate student in his early 20s. He also could pass for being a hot-dogging young surfer, the kind who happily frequent the city's famous beaches. Mays, in fact, is a former surfer, as he told about about 50 radio, television and print reporters from throughout the nation at a news conference last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2002 | Susan Freudenheim, Times Staff Writer
J Mays is driving a brand new red convertible Thunderbird with the top down. It's a beautiful day, the traffic on the Strip is unusually light, and he's smiling, snug in the bucket seat, knees just above the bottom of the steering wheel, one hand steering, the other resting on the bright red gearshift. Short cropped hair, Brioni suit, black mock-turtleneck. Very cool. A young woman pulls up beside him, rolls down her window and asks how much the car sells for.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1990 | MARIA NEWMAN and BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The boyish-looking mayor was blushing. Only 13 days before, lanky and soft-spoken Thomas J. Mays was in the third month of his one-year term, serving in a largely ceremonial and sometimes obscure post. But a week ago Tuesday, an overflow audience in the City Council chambers was on its feet delivering thunderous applause in honor of Mays' leadership since the Feb. 7 oil spill.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2003 | Greg Braxton, Times Staff Writer
Is O.J. about to come back into your living room? A small, Texas-based network says it's considering an unscripted series featuring clips of O.J. Simpson, whose nationally televised 1995 trial in the slaying of his ex-wife was a sensation long before "reality" TV became a modern mainstay. Urban Television Network Corp., with 70 affiliates that reach 22 million households, said it had a memorandum of understanding with Spiderboy International Inc.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
The state Senate voted Thursday to eliminate the poet laureate position after the current title holder refused to resign for writing a poem implying Israel had advance knowledge of the 2001 terrorist attacks. The measure still must pass the Assembly. Current rules say the title cannot be rescinded and the governor and Legislature cannot fire Amiri Baraka, poet laureate since July. Baraka drew criticism after reading his poem "Somebody Blew Up America" at a festival last summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2002 | Susan Freudenheim, Times Staff Writer
J Mays is driving a brand new red convertible Thunderbird with the top down. It's a beautiful day, the traffic on the Strip is unusually light, and he's smiling, snug in the bucket seat, knees just above the bottom of the steering wheel, one hand steering, the other resting on the bright red gearshift. Short cropped hair, Brioni suit, black mock-turtleneck. Very cool. A young woman pulls up beside him, rolls down her window and asks how much the car sells for.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2001 | WILLIAM BORDEN, REUTERS
Johnson & Johnson, which markets diabetes-care products made by Inverness Medical Technology Inc., said Wednesday that it's in talks to buy the business from Inverness for about $1.3 billion in hopes of regaining market leadership in blood sugar monitors. The health-care giant said that as part of the deal, Inverness would spin off its non-diabetes businesses--women's health, nutritional supplements and clinical diagnostics--to form a publicly traded company owned by Inverness shareholders.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | SUSAN G. HAUSER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Another 24 hours have rolled off into the sunset without a single bowling ball crashing from the Vista Avenue Viaduct. For yet another day, and by now about six whole months free of bowling ball droppings, the people of Portland owe their thanks to D.J. Galloway, brave and vigilant bowling ball patrolwoman. Galloway spends eight hours a day, six days a week perched on the concrete bridge, keeping a lookout for errant bowlers.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | SUSAN G. HAUSER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Another 24 hours have rolled off into the sunset without a single bowling ball crashing from the Vista Avenue Viaduct. For yet another day, and by now about six whole months free of bowling ball droppings, the people of Portland owe their thanks to D.J. Galloway, brave and vigilant bowling ball patrolwoman. Galloway spends eight hours a day, six days a week perched on the concrete bridge, keeping a lookout for errant bowlers.
SPORTS
September 11, 1992 | T.J. SIMERS
Charger guard David Richards, the big financial winner in the players victory over the NFL in the anti-trust lawsuit verdict, will be sending a "thank you" note to former teammate Mark May. Richards was awarded $240,000 by an eight-women jury in Minneapolis, and because the damages are trebled, Richards stands to receive $720,000. "They took the difference between Mark May's salary and mine and doubled it," Richards said. "There was a direct comparison there between two players on the same team.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Scott Paper Co.'s chairman and chief executive, Alfred J. Dunlap, stands to pocket up to $100 million from selling the company to Kimberly-Clark in a $6.8-billion deal announced Monday. But he says he's the "biggest bargain in corporate America." Dunlap said Scott's shareholder value has increased by $4.5 billion since he took over in April, 1994, and began a series of deep cost-cutting moves at the paper maker. "My entire focus from the first day I joined Scott has been . . .
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Heroes are created by popular demand, sometimes out of the scantiest materials, or none at all. --Gerald W. Johnson, in his 1943 book, "American Heroes and Hero-Worship" There is a moment, in the lives of some whom society holds up as idols, when private character collides with a public persona. It is at this juncture that Americans often make a jarring, unwanted discovery: Their gods have feet of clay. John F. Kennedy, we learn after his death, cheated on his genteel wife.
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