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BUSINESS
February 12, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People used to talk about the ad agency Muse Cordero Chen chiefly because its namesakes are such an unlikely triumvirate. Its president is black. The general manager is a Latina. And an Asian is executive vice president. Lately, however, the minority-owned Los Angeles agency isn't being discussed because of who runs it. It is in the news for the sudden slew of business it is winning. Just last month, it picked up four new clients that added more than $4 million in billings to the firm.
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BUSINESS
February 12, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People used to talk about the ad agency Muse Cordero Chen chiefly because its namesakes are such an unlikely triumvirate. Its president is black. The general manager is a Latina. And an Asian is executive vice president. Lately, however, the minority-owned Los Angeles agency isn't being discussed because of who runs it. It is in the news for the sudden slew of business it is winning. Just last month, it picked up four new clients that added more than $4 million in billings to the firm.
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BUSINESS
May 19, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The last thing Procter & Gamble executives expect to see across from their headquarters is a billboard advertisement featuring Wisk. That, after all, is the dreaded competitor to their No. 1 seller, Liquid Tide. But there the billboard sits--larger then any load of laundry. And imagine trying to get Pepsi's attention with an ad that says: "Hey Coke, bomb the fizz out of Pepsi." Or rousing Nuprin's interest with an ad that beckons: "Hey Advil, neutralize Nuprin."
BUSINESS
May 19, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The last thing Procter & Gamble executives expect to see across from their headquarters is a billboard advertisement featuring Wisk. That, after all, is the dreaded competitor to their No. 1 seller, Liquid Tide. But there the billboard sits--larger then any load of laundry. And imagine trying to get Pepsi's attention with an ad that says: "Hey Coke, bomb the fizz out of Pepsi." Or rousing Nuprin's interest with an ad that beckons: "Hey Advil, neutralize Nuprin."
BUSINESS
November 14, 1990 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nike Inc., which has been the target of a nationwide boycott organized by a civil rights group, Tuesday selected a Los Angeles-based agency to help create minority advertising. Muse Cordero Chen, which has created ads targeting blacks, Latinos and Asians, will work initially on adapting Nike's "Just Do It" corporate campaign and its "Stay In School" public affairs program for ethnic groups. Muse Cordero Chen will work with Nike's current agency, Portland, Ore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1986 | LANIE JONES, Times Political Writer
Displaying summaries of his tax returns, Rep. Robert E. Badham (R-Newport Beach) on Friday challenged his Republican opponent to make the same information public and to explain "who is Nathan Rosenberg, who sent him here and where does he get his money?"
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | MARY LOU LOPER
The Junior League of Los Angeles recently found itself the recipient of a windfall that will allow it, finally, to own its own home. Marjorie Rainey, a civic leader and former league president who died in December, left the league $1 million and property in Santa Monica with the instruction that funds be used for a French Regency building for a headquarters.
BUSINESS
October 19, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is believed to be a first for the advertising industry, a local Latino-owned agency has purchased a mainstream ad shop. Castellanos Latina Advertising, a 4-year-old Hollywood agency that creates Spanish-language ads for Forest Lawn Memorial Parks and bilingual ads for Mazatlan Tourism, on Thursday purchased the 16-year-old Encino-based agency Good Guise Advertising & Marketing. Good Guise creates ads for several residential real estate firms in the San Fernando Valley.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
To be hip in urban America, a new product's gotta have street buzz. But some cutting-edge marketers are now convinced that the buzz needs some carefully crafted cajoling. Enter the Street Team. The name of this urban marketing group sounds like some sort of tactical weapons squad. But the "weapons" are freebies--T-shirts, records, posters--that are used as tools to promote new products, from Miramax films to hip-hop albums from Sony.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Los Angeles-area residents are about to face an onslaught of advertising that doesn't ask us to buy a thing. But the ads are going to ask us to change our lifestyles. Rebuild L.A. will begin to broadcast public service spots this week with the theme line, "Our L.A.," featuring compelling interviews with residents groping for answers to the city's racial tensions. Spots aimed at persuading Californians not to smoke will begin to air this week.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Jean Craig may be the most powerful ad woman in Los Angeles, but when it comes to creating ads that reflect the lives of minorities, she has always felt powerless. The Los Angeles riots underscored that impression. So days after the riots began, Craig, who is president of the Santa Monica ad firm Kresser/Craig, batted out this memo to agency employees: "I don't think most of us know beans about black life in the United States, or Hispanic life," she said.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1992 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Suppose you are a big TV advertiser--like Pepsi or Burger King--with fistfuls of ad money. You spend $177,000 for a 30-second spot on "Roseanne." You toss in another $155,000 for an ad on "60 Minutes." For good measure, you fork over $154,000 for a spot on "Murphy Brown." These were the three most popular TV shows during the first half of the 1991-92 television season. To reach all segments of TV viewers, you can't go wrong with them, right? Wrong.
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