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J Michael Hagopian

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NEWS
October 28, 1991 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The state Department of Education paid a Thousand Oaks man $50,000 to make a documentary on the massacre of Armenians by the Turks, but has refused to distribute the film to schools after expressing concerns about alleged interference from the Legislature and about the quality of the film. J. Michael Hagopian, who was born in Turkish Armenia in 1913, the son of a surgeon, was nominated twice for Emmy awards for earlier films on the subject.
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OPINION
December 24, 2010
Most who suffer unspeakably at the hands of others look for ways to forget, to resume a normal life as best they can. Some, however, assume the duty of witness in the hope that truthful memory will protect those who come after them. The passing of these heroic men and women ought not to go unremarked upon. J. Michael Hagopian, who died this month in Thousand Oaks, was one such man. He was just 2 years old in 1915, when his parents hid him in a well behind their home because they believed they were about to be killed by Ottoman Turkish soldiers, who were massacring Armenians across eastern Anatolia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
J. Michael Hagopian, an educational filmmaker who spent 40 years gathering the testimonies of Armenian genocide survivors to provide evidence of one of the most contentious events in world history, died of natural causes Friday at his home in Thousand Oaks. He was 97. His death was announced by the Armenian Film Foundation, which he established in 1979 to preserve Armenian heritage and culture. The filmmaker was a survivor of the genocide, which historians estimate resulted in the deaths of as many as 1.5 million Armenians in Ottoman-ruled Turkey beginning in 1915.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
J. Michael Hagopian, an educational filmmaker who spent 40 years gathering the testimonies of Armenian genocide survivors to provide evidence of one of the most contentious events in world history, died of natural causes Friday at his home in Thousand Oaks. He was 97. His death was announced by the Armenian Film Foundation, which he established in 1979 to preserve Armenian heritage and culture. The filmmaker was a survivor of the genocide, which historians estimate resulted in the deaths of as many as 1.5 million Armenians in Ottoman-ruled Turkey beginning in 1915.
OPINION
December 24, 2010
Most who suffer unspeakably at the hands of others look for ways to forget, to resume a normal life as best they can. Some, however, assume the duty of witness in the hope that truthful memory will protect those who come after them. The passing of these heroic men and women ought not to go unremarked upon. J. Michael Hagopian, who died this month in Thousand Oaks, was one such man. He was just 2 years old in 1915, when his parents hid him in a well behind their home because they believed they were about to be killed by Ottoman Turkish soldiers, who were massacring Armenians across eastern Anatolia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL
Supporters of Thousand Oaks Councilmen Frank Schillo and Alex Fiore have formed an alliance to fight a campaign to throw the two officials out of office. "It's wrong in our view to recall two council people who have been honorable . . . just because you don't agree with their ideas," said J. Michael Hagopian, one of the leaders of the Committee to Stop the Recall. The councilmen are facing recall because they support the city's Jungleland project, a $64.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1990
In recent press reports regarding the politics of east Ventura County, readers might get the impression that the grass-roots environmental movement in the Conejo Valley is a new phenomenon. Indeed, environmental and growth issues have been, and continue to be the most important concerns of the people of Thousand Oaks. For many years there has been a strong and effective grass-roots environmental force that elected among others, Frances Prince, Lee Laxdal and Bob Lewis to the Thousand Oaks City Council.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1998 | HOLLY J. WOLCOTT
A 20-year-old film foundation in Thousand Oaks has been awarded a $10,000 grant from the California Council for the Humanities to produce a film about an Armenian family's immigration to America. The Armenian Film Foundation is one of 18 nonprofit organizations throughout the state to share a total of $165,000 in grant money for public humanities projects, said Patrice Garrett, a council spokeswoman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1992 | G. BRUCE SMITH
A state commission will not overturn the state Department of Education's refusal to distribute a Thousand Oaks man's film on the Armenian massacre to public schools. The state Curriculum Commission agreed last week, however, to allow J. Michael Hagopian to try to sell on his own the 25-minute videotape to junior and senior high schools for use in history and social studies classes. The decision ends a dispute over whether the education department should distribute the film statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1990 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A link forged by a natural disaster nearly two years ago may turn into a cultural partnership between the city of Thousand Oaks and an Armenian community on the opposite side of the world. Spitak, a community of about 30,000 about 75 miles northwest of the Armenian capital of Yerevan, was devastated Dec. 7, 1988, when an earthquake hit Armenia. Thousand Oaks residents, many of them Armenians, responded by establishing a fund that sent medical aid to the city nearly 9,000 miles away.
NEWS
October 28, 1991 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The state Department of Education paid a Thousand Oaks man $50,000 to make a documentary on the massacre of Armenians by the Turks, but has refused to distribute the film to schools after expressing concerns about alleged interference from the Legislature and about the quality of the film. J. Michael Hagopian, who was born in Turkish Armenia in 1913, the son of a surgeon, was nominated twice for Emmy awards for earlier films on the subject.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1991 | G. BRUCE SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The state Department of Education paid a Thousand Oaks man $50,000 to make a documentary on the massacre of Armenians by the Turks earlier this century but has refused to distribute the film to state schools. Education officials have expressed concerns about both alleged interference from the Legislature and the quality of the film. J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they linked hands and began to form a circle, a boisterous group of Armenian-Americans joyously plunged into a traditional dance in celebration of their native country's declaration of independence. "There's a lot of pride in the fact that they're independent," said Thousand Oaks resident J. Michael Hagopian, of his native countrymen's decision to break free from more than 70 years of Soviet domination.
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