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J Michael Quinlan

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NEWS
December 4, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. Michael Quinlan, director of the federal bureau of prisons since 1987, is suffering from a serious illness and is expected to resign soon, a government source said Thursday. Quinlan, 51, whose illness was described as not life-threatening, has won top awards from the White House and attorney general. He is highly regarded by correctional officials.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 1998
In a changing of the guard, McDonald's Corp. replaced its chief executive, as the world's largest fast-food chain struggles to fend off domestic competition. The company said domestic chief Jack M. Greenberg will replace Michael Quinlan as chief executive. Quinlan, 53, only the third chief executive in McDonald's history, will remain chairman of the Oak Brook, Ill.-based chain.
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BUSINESS
May 1, 1998
In a changing of the guard, McDonald's Corp. replaced its chief executive, as the world's largest fast-food chain struggles to fend off domestic competition. The company said domestic chief Jack M. Greenberg will replace Michael Quinlan as chief executive. Quinlan, 53, only the third chief executive in McDonald's history, will remain chairman of the Oak Brook, Ill.-based chain.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J. Michael Quinlan, director of the federal bureau of prisons since 1987, is suffering from a serious illness and is expected to resign soon, a government source said Thursday. Quinlan, 51, whose illness was described as not life-threatening, has won top awards from the White House and attorney general. He is highly regarded by correctional officials.
NEWS
May 26, 1986 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
The prison has no walls, fences, bars, gun towers or guns. Guards are nattily attired in gray slacks, powder-blue shirts, maroon ties and navy blazers. Amenities include a swimming pool and two full-time recreation directors. Some inmates, who are allowed to leave the prison unescorted, spend their days working in nearby communities and their evenings umpiring games for the local Little League. Incarceration at the Federal Prison Camp at Boron is more a state of mind than a state of siege.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Bureau of Prisons denied that an inmate was held incommunicado four days before the 1988 presidential election to silence his allegation that he sold marijuana to Vice President Dan Quayle. The prisoner, held in a federal prison in El Reno, Okla., was placed in a special punishment cell on the orders of Bureau of Prisons Director J. Michael Quinlan. But a bureau spokesman said the convict--Brett Kimberlin--was ordered into special detention because of concerns about his safety.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Four days before the 1988 presidential election, Bureau of Prisons Director J. Michael Quinlan ordered a federal prisoner be placed in detention and barred from talking to reporters about allegations that the prisoner had once sold marijuana to now-Vice President Dan Quayle, according to a Bureau of Prisons lawyer's letter disclosed in federal court this week. In a letter to a lawyer representing convicted drug smuggler Brett C. Kimberlin, Bureau of Prisons regional counsel Carolyn A.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department said Friday its inspector general will investigate allegations that a federal prisoner was silenced during the 1988 campaign when he sought to publicly charge that he once sold marijuana to Vice President Dan Quayle. Inspector General Richard J. Hankinson agreed to conduct an investigation to determine why Bureau of Prisons Director J.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | From United Press International
The federal government announced plans Friday to build a 1,000-bed prison in the District of Columbia, where a crack cocaine epidemic and America's worst murder rate have taxed local facilities. Bureau of Prisons Director J. Michael Quinlan said the proposed $80-million Metropolitan Detention Center will hold defendants in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service while they await trial. The facility is designed to help relieve severe overcrowding at the District of Columbia Jail.
NEWS
December 4, 1987 | Times Wire Services
Two busloads of Cuban prisoners left the federal penitentiary today for other prisons, hours after protesting Cubans freed their 89 hostages and ended their 11-day uprising in return for a moratorium on deportations of all Mariel detainees. Bureau of Prisons Director Michael Quinlan said in Washington that authorities began to re-enter the prison about noon, 11 hours after the former hostages streamed out of the prison to the embraces of their families.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1992
Re Pete Earley's latest book, "The Hot House," (Feb. 16): The Bureau of Prisons believes that the public should be made aware of several facts. Specifically, the book gives the average citizen an interesting but narrow view of life and work in a high-security prison. It's a good book as far as it goes--catering to America's fascination with the criminal extreme. But it falls short in several areas, distorting a great deal of the picture it attempts to portray. Mr.
NEWS
September 22, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, in an unusual session that one participant described as "a real bloodletting," Wednesday ordered the heads of three Justice Department agencies to end their opposition to a compromise he had worked out on legislation overhauling the department's inspector-general powers.
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