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J Michael Straczynski

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2006 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
J. Michael Straczynski's "Changeling" is one of those blessed and doomed screenplays that periodically floats around Hollywood: a truly gripping read that actors and directors respond to with passion but that nonetheless has a hard time getting made. For a screenwriter, this can be an excruciating reality that only gets more painful when an A-list director is among those flirting with it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2006 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
J. Michael Straczynski's "Changeling" is one of those blessed and doomed screenplays that periodically floats around Hollywood: a truly gripping read that actors and directors respond to with passion but that nonetheless has a hard time getting made. For a screenwriter, this can be an excruciating reality that only gets more painful when an A-list director is among those flirting with it.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2008 | Lynne Heffley
Universal Pictures will release Clint Eastwood's latest, "Changeling," a reality-based thriller starring Angelina Jolie and John Malkovich, on Oct. 24 in limited engagements followed by wide release Oct. 31. Eastwood earned the Cannes Film Festival's special 61st Festival Prize for directing the story of a mother of a missing child looking for answers when she believes that the boy returned to her by the Los Angeles Police Department isn't hers....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Now here's a real story from the "Twilight Zone." It seems that master writer-creator of the original "Twilight Zone" TV show, Rod Serling, left behind three outlines for episodes that he never finished. J. Michael Straczynski, chief story editor for the new syndicated program of the same name (seen locally on KTLA Channel 5), received the submissions from Carol Serling (Rod's widow), who found them going through Serling's papers.
MAGAZINE
June 16, 1991
According to KPFK radio talk-show host J. Michael Straczynski, "Star Trek: The Next Generation" has not fostered quite as pervasive a cult as Classic Trek. I have attended numerous conventions over the years filled with a multitude of people from various backgrounds and age groups, and I have found that "Star Trek: The Next Generation" is as pervasive a cult as Classic Trek ever was, perhaps even more. We were all skeptical when "TNG" premiered but have found that with each passing season the quality has surpassed the original.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2008 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
One OF the most notorious crimes of Jazz Age Los Angeles began quietly enough with a lost boy. But the Walter Collins case would end up becoming the O.J. Simpson drama of its day, a horrifying crime that inspired a media frenzy and captivated the Southland. What started as the real-life tale of a missing child would eventually take on a much larger significance in the then-burgeoning city.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN
"I get off on the excitement from the fans at these conventions," says Bruce Boxleitner, who plays Cmdr. John Sheridan on "Babylon 5." "Everything else you do with TV, you never really get feedback." Boxleitner is sure to get plenty of feedback this weekend at the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" and "Babylon 5" convention in Pasadena. He will be joined by "Babylon 5" creator J. Michael Straczynski and co-stars Andreas Katsulas, Bill Mumy and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1986
In all the discussion, pro and con, regarding the colorizing of old black-and-white films (and for the record, I'm against it), a delicious irony has been overlooked by both the media and those directly involved in the debate (Calendar, Outtakes, Calendar Letters, "Nightline" "The Tonight Show," etc., summer and fall, 1986). The colorizers maintain that once a film leaves a director's hands, and they acquire the property, they can do to it whatever they like. Now, according to director Milos Forman, "in civilized societies, the right of an artist that his work will not be altered or changed in any way by anybody but himself should be respected."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1994 | RAY LOYND
There is good news and bad news about "Babylon 5," the latest in a burgeoning cluster of sci-fi series streaking across your television screen (premiering at 8 tonight on KCOP-TV Channel 13). The show's premise is not exactly original but it's not a copycat "Star Trek" either.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1999
Your paper has recently been addressing the issue of sex and violence on television. There has been, and still is, some quality programming on television--you just have to know where to look. When I wanted an interesting, thought-provoking program, I used to watch "Babylon 5." There, I could get a dose of interesting characters dealing with real-life issues (no matter the alienness of the space setting), while forming complex relationships. It was interesting, intelligent and never gratuitous in dealing with sex or violence.
MAGAZINE
January 24, 1993 | Sheldon Teitelbaum
When J. Michael Straczynski decided he wanted to build a better sci-fi series, he took his dream to the people who would truly understand--computer hacks. In November, 1991, Straczynski, formerly a writer for "Murder, She Wrote" and the second "Twilight Zone" series, opened up a special-interest forum on Genie, a national computer bulletin board service.
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