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J N Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge

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NEWS
April 8, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
High atop a 20-foot tower, Doug Mackey alerted the dozen visitors: "Look at the Roseate spoonbills coming right at us," he said, identifying two large, pink wading birds with huge spoon-shaped bills flying toward the observation platform. Their flashy pass was just a part of the spectacular display of nature that Mackey, 38, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife public-use manager, shares with guests at this refuge.
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NEWS
April 8, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER
High atop a 20-foot tower, Doug Mackey alerted the dozen visitors: "Look at the Roseate spoonbills coming right at us," he said, identifying two large, pink wading birds with huge spoon-shaped bills flying toward the observation platform. Their flashy pass was just a part of the spectacular display of nature that Mackey, 38, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife public-use manager, shares with guests at this refuge.
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TRAVEL
February 27, 2005 | Arthur Frommer, Special to The Times
Sanibel ISLAND, off southwestern Florida, has changed. Many of the pines along its 4 1/2 -mile main street, Periwinkle Way, were destroyed by Hurricane Charley last year. If you have never been to this vacation gem, you won't know the difference. And although you'll see fallen trees and shrubs along the side streets and marshlands, you'll find Sanibel's white-sand beaches unaltered, picturesque and strewn with more seashells than you'll probably find anywhere else in America.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2004 | John-Thor Dahlburg and Lianne Hart, Times Staff Writers
This crescent of sand bathed by the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico is one of Florida's mythic destinations, a magnet for bird-watchers, seashell gatherers and the sun-starved. On Wednesday, islanders who fled as a hurricane approached were allowed back for the first time, and many came with their hearts in their throats. At her home on South Yachtsman Drive, Mary Wolf rushed indoors to see whether the wooden canoe handcrafted by her late husband was intact. It was.
TRAVEL
December 1, 2002 | By Susan Spano
Sanibel Island, Fla. -- Seen on the beach here: Florida fighting conchs, sand dollars, tapering lightning whelks, calico scallops, spiky murexes, kitten's paws, all abundant and free for the taking, assuming the little critters these shells once housed have moved on. Shells may be hard to find on other beaches, but they wash ashore in piles on Sanibel and Captiva, two slender barrier islands connected by a bridge off the west coast of Florida....
NEWS
March 17, 1985 | BETTY HUGHES, Hughes is assistant travel editor of The Times
Is this the little girl I carried? Is this the little boy at play? I don't remember growing older, When did they? "Sunrise, Sunset," From "Fiddler on the Roof" 1964 Alley Music Corp. and Trio Music Co. Inc. All rights administered by Hudson Bay Music All young parents always find it difficult to believe, but take it from those of us with grown families: Time passes far, far too quickly.
TRAVEL
May 2, 1993 | ANNE WHITEHOUSE, Whitehouse is a New York City-based free-lance writer. and
When my husband's grandfather first visited Sanibel Island in the late 1940s, he arrived by ferry, over three miles of shallow, blue-green waters, from near Ft. Myers on the mainland. There were only two places to stay on the island, guest houses where the accommodations were simple and rustic. Meals were served at set times, and there was a choice of one or two entrees, usually a local fish.
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