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J Patrice Marandel

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June 9, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
J. Patrice Marandel, named Monday as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's curator of European paintings and sculpture, is heading West with high hopes for putting his stamp on a collection that he has watched develop over the last 20 years. "I think it's a wonderful collection. It has grown extraordinarily," said Marandel, a 48-year-old Frenchman who specializes in French and Italian painting of the 17th and 18th centuries.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
To hear him tell it, the story of J. Patrice Marandel's arrival on the staff of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is a cliffhanger with a happy ending. The tale begins in May 1993, when Marandel was the veteran curator of European paintings at the Detroit Institute of Arts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1997 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In these days of high art prices and low acquisitions budgets, J. Patrice Marandel, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's curator of European painting and sculpture, is in an enviable position. Although the museum itself has little money to spend on artworks, the Ahmanson Foundation provides funds for acquisitions in his department. A couple of times each year, he adds something special to the collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1997 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
In these days of high art prices and low acquisitions budgets, J. Patrice Marandel, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's curator of European painting and sculpture, is in an enviable position. Although the museum itself has little money to spend on artworks, the Ahmanson Foundation provides funds for acquisitions in his department. A couple of times each year, he adds something special to the collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
To hear him tell it, the story of J. Patrice Marandel's arrival on the staff of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art is a cliffhanger with a happy ending. The tale begins in May 1993, when Marandel was the veteran curator of European paintings at the Detroit Institute of Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2005
As a curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the curator in charge of the exhibition "Jacob van Ruisdael: Master of Landscape" mentioned in Holly Myers' article ["A Museum Has Lost Its Muses," July 6], I feel compelled to challenge her myopic understanding of how museums work. Like theatrical or operatic productions, exhibitions are huge enterprises that can only be the result of collaboration between institutions. Does Myers find it objectionable that a production of "La Traviata" in Los Angeles originated in Sydney or Frankfurt?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2005
As chief curator of European art at LACMA, I read Christopher Reynolds' article "Which Way, LACMA?" (June 12) with interest. One point about the museum's recent record in acquisitions should be clarified. Mr. Reynolds states that "acquisition spending has sputtered.... The museum has averaged $6.3 million yearly on art acquisitions over the last two years ... after averaging $11.3 million over the previous five." The wording suggests that this is what the museum spent on purchases, but the Carter collection of Dutch paintings, which Mr. Reynolds cites, was not bought by LACMA.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
For the 72nd time in 22 years, the Ahmanson Foundation has provided the Los Angeles County Museum of Art with funds to make a significant addition to its collection. More often than not, these gifts have been European Old Master paintings. The latest--a life-size portrait of an English gentleman on a Grand Tour of Europe, painted in 1759 by Italian artist Pompeo Batoni and purchased from a dealer at an undisclosed price--is no exception.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Amid all the hoopla about the opening of the Broad Contemporary Art Museum at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, a Venetian Renaissance painting by Cima da Conegliano has quietly joined LACMA's collection. "The Madonna and Child in a Landscape," a delicately detailed work in oil and tempera made in the 1490s, will go on view today on the third floor of the Ahmanson Building. Like dozens of other Old Masters at LACMA, the Cima was purchased with funds from the Ahmanson Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The sometimes-snubbed French Rococo court artist Francois Boucher gets another chance in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's installation "Boucher Rediscovered: The Conservation of Three 18th Century Works From the Permanent Collection." Boucher's appreciation problem is partly historical. A favorite of Louis XV, he was immensely successful in his time, a reliable old pro who popularized Rococo, a more intimate and playful version of the grand Baroque.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
J. Patrice Marandel, named Monday as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's curator of European paintings and sculpture, is heading West with high hopes for putting his stamp on a collection that he has watched develop over the last 20 years. "I think it's a wonderful collection. It has grown extraordinarily," said Marandel, a 48-year-old Frenchman who specializes in French and Italian painting of the 17th and 18th centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Gifts from the Ahmanson Foundation have enabled the Los Angeles County Museum of Art to build a remarkable collection of Old Master and later European paintings. Beginning with a gift of Rembrandt's "The Raising of Lazarus" in 1972, the L.A.-based foundation has provided several million dollars (exact sums are not disclosed) for a couple of significant new additions every year. It's that time again, and the latest acquisition purchased with Ahmanson funds is anything but routine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The J. Paul Getty Museum, outbid three months ago in its efforts to land a coveted Rubens painting, is one step from closing a deal to buy another Old Master: Raphael's "Madonna of the Pinks." The 16th century painting, whose price is estimated at $50 million, is considered the last undisputed work by the artist in private hands.
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