Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJ Patrick Barrett
IN THE NEWS

J Patrick Barrett

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 10, 1989 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
The owners of the 28 National Football League clubs will make another run at an elusive target here today. Still divided after six months of in-fighting, they will interview four candidates for commissioner and try to vote one into office tonight. Or Wednesday. Or Thursday. Or someday. Their new search committee has turned up only one new candidate in the last three months--J. Patrick Barrett, a Syracuse, N.Y., investor, businessman, and politician.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
October 12, 1989 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dallas was no different than Chicago. The National Football League's 28 owners still cannot agree on who should be their next commissioner. Once again Wednesday, in Dallas, the owners did not produce the required 19 votes to select a commissioner. Neither could they do it at their July meeting in Chicago, when Jim Finks came the closest. So on Tuesday, Oct. 24, they will meet in Cleveland.
Advertisement
SPORTS
October 12, 1989 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dallas was no different than Chicago. The National Football League's 28 owners still cannot agree on who should be their next commissioner. Once again Wednesday, in Dallas, the owners did not produce the required 19 votes to select a commissioner. Neither could they do it at their July meeting in Chicago, when Jim Finks came the closest. So on Tuesday, Oct. 24, they will meet in Cleveland.
SPORTS
October 10, 1989 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
The owners of the 28 National Football League clubs will make another run at an elusive target here today. Still divided after six months of in-fighting, they will interview four candidates for commissioner and try to vote one into office tonight. Or Wednesday. Or Thursday. Or someday. Their new search committee has turned up only one new candidate in the last three months--J. Patrick Barrett, a Syracuse, N.Y., investor, businessman, and politician.
SPORTS
September 28, 1989 | From Times wire services
New York state Republican Chairman J. Patrick Barrett is a finalist in the search to replace Pete Rozelle as NFL commissioner, according to a broadcast report. Barrett, 52, wasn't immediately available for comment this morning on the ESPN report broadcast Wednesday.
SPORTS
October 12, 1989 | From Times wire services
J. Patrick Barrett, New York state Republican chairman, today withdrew his name from consideration for the NFL commissioner's job. Barrett was one of four finalists interviewed by club owners at their meeting in Grapevine, Tex., this week in their search for a successor to Pete Rozelle, who is retiring. "I withdraw with regret," Barrett said in a statement. "Yet my withdrawal is necessary because I have family and business commitments that cannot be postponed any longer."
NEWS
January 8, 1994 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York Gov. Mario M. Cuomo, positioning himself as a crime-fighter and tax-cutter, announced Friday that he would seek a fourth term. The decision by one of the most durable figures in the Democratic Party--who tantalized the nation with his deliberations over whether to seek the 1992 presidential nomination--was widely expected. Last year, Cuomo told President Clinton that he did not want to be considered as a possible Supreme Court justice.
SPORTS
October 11, 1989 | Associated Press
The four finalists for NFL commissioner made their cases to the 28 divided owners Tuesday but every sign pointed to a two-man race between Jim Finks and Paul Tagliabue. It was the first attempt at electing a new commissioner since July 6, when Finks, president of the New Orleans Saints, fell three votes short of the 19 necessary for election. Finks and Tagliabue have been the favorites since Pete Rozelle announced his resignation seven months ago.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Avis Inc., the nation's second-largest auto rental company, was sold to its employees through their employee stock ownership plan Monday for $1.75 billion in the largest deal of its kind in history. The employees' buyout set size records in terms of both dollars and number of employees involved, according to the ESOP Assn. of America, a Washington, D.C., trade group made up of employee stock ownership plans. The transaction continued a recent trend of huge buyouts of companies by their workers.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|