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J R Moehringer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1998
J.R. Moehringer, Atlanta bureau chief of the Los Angeles Times, has won the Livingston Award for local reporting. Moehringer, 33, received the national honor for a Los Angeles Times Magazine story about Bob Satterfield, a heavyweight boxing contender of the 1940s and 1950s, and the fighter who impersonated Satterfield long after his death.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MAGAZINE
April 15, 2007 | J.R. Moehringer, J.R. Moehringer is a senior writer at West.
Confession: I recently wore a necktie. I don't know what I was thinking. It was a first date, a midday coffee date, and I was coming straight from a business appointment, so I didn't have time to change. The young woman, wearing jeans and flats, stared at my necktie as if it were a lobster bib. Her face said: My granddad wore a tie like that. When we buried him. That was the moment I came to terms with the painful truth--the necktie is dead.
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NEWS
April 11, 2000 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J.R. Moehringer, a Times national correspondent based in Atlanta, won the Pulitzer Prize in feature writing Monday for his evocative portrait of an isolated river community in Alabama where descendants of slaves live on the land of their ancestors.
MAGAZINE
April 30, 2006 | J.R. Moehringer, J.R. Moehringer is a senior writer for West and the author of the memoir "The Tender Bar."
This is a big night for John Fante, and for his son, Dan, who is proud of the old man, even if he doesn't often say so. Dan needs to be in the right mood to speak well of John, and tonight you can see in his smile, he's in the right mood. Tonight Dan is setting aside the bad memories, the sorrow and rage and resentment over John, for a few hours. For as long as any son can set aside such things. Many consider Dan's father the best novelist Los Angeles has ever produced.
BOOKS
September 11, 2005 | Donna Rifkind, Donna Rifkind is a critic and reviewer who has written for several publications, including the Washington Post, the American Scholar and the Wall Street Journal.
"TO be a man, a boy must see a man." The sentence shows up casually, in the middle of a paragraph, but it may as well be the refrain of J.R. Moehringer's soulful memoir, "The Tender Bar." Life was rocky from the start: His father disappeared after cornering Moehringer's mother in the bathroom with a straight razor when his son was 7 months old, and he was ever after a vaporous presence in his life. Early on, Moehringer began searching for men in whose image he might make himself.
MAGAZINE
April 15, 2007 | J.R. Moehringer, J.R. Moehringer is a senior writer at West.
Confession: I recently wore a necktie. I don't know what I was thinking. It was a first date, a midday coffee date, and I was coming straight from a business appointment, so I didn't have time to change. The young woman, wearing jeans and flats, stared at my necktie as if it were a lobster bib. Her face said: My granddad wore a tie like that. When we buried him. That was the moment I came to terms with the painful truth--the necktie is dead.
MAGAZINE
April 30, 2006 | J.R. Moehringer, J.R. Moehringer is a senior writer for West and the author of the memoir "The Tender Bar."
This is a big night for John Fante, and for his son, Dan, who is proud of the old man, even if he doesn't often say so. Dan needs to be in the right mood to speak well of John, and tonight you can see in his smile, he's in the right mood. Tonight Dan is setting aside the bad memories, the sorrow and rage and resentment over John, for a few hours. For as long as any son can set aside such things. Many consider Dan's father the best novelist Los Angeles has ever produced.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2007 | Susan King
In May 1997, the Los Angeles Times published J.R. Moehringer's heartfelt story "Resurrecting the Champ," chronicling the sad life of a professional boxer who was homeless and living on the streets. More than just a tale about the downfall of a sports figure, the article also dealt with Moehringer's relationship with "The Champ," as well as the writer coming to terms with his own father's abandonment of the family when he was a baby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2000
Kudos to J.R. Moehringer for the well-deserved Pulitzer Prize (April 11). I was so impressed with his Gee's Bend article that I clipped it, copied it and sent it to several friends throughout the world. DAVID GRAHAM Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997
J.R. Moehringer's article, "The Longest Day" (June 18), a soliloquy on the last day of school for a class of Rancho Santa Margarita second-graders, was absolutely the loveliest, most charming, bittersweet piece of writing I've seen in years. ROB HALLWACHS Altadena
BOOKS
September 11, 2005 | Donna Rifkind, Donna Rifkind is a critic and reviewer who has written for several publications, including the Washington Post, the American Scholar and the Wall Street Journal.
"TO be a man, a boy must see a man." The sentence shows up casually, in the middle of a paragraph, but it may as well be the refrain of J.R. Moehringer's soulful memoir, "The Tender Bar." Life was rocky from the start: His father disappeared after cornering Moehringer's mother in the bathroom with a straight razor when his son was 7 months old, and he was ever after a vaporous presence in his life. Early on, Moehringer began searching for men in whose image he might make himself.
NEWS
April 11, 2000 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J.R. Moehringer, a Times national correspondent based in Atlanta, won the Pulitzer Prize in feature writing Monday for his evocative portrait of an isolated river community in Alabama where descendants of slaves live on the land of their ancestors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1998
J.R. Moehringer, Atlanta bureau chief of the Los Angeles Times, has won the Livingston Award for local reporting. Moehringer, 33, received the national honor for a Los Angeles Times Magazine story about Bob Satterfield, a heavyweight boxing contender of the 1940s and 1950s, and the fighter who impersonated Satterfield long after his death.
NEWS
December 30, 1994
Contributing to today's coverage of Orange County's financial turmoil were Times staff writers Greg Hernandez, Michael A. Hiltzik, Sheila Kern, Matt Lait, Susan Marquez Owen, Julie Marquis, Martin Miller, J.R. Moehringer, Mark I. Pinsky, Mark Platte, Lee Romney, Debora Vrana, Tracy Weber and Chris Woodyard. Also contributing were correspondents Jeff Bean, Bert Eljera, Alan Eyerly, Danielle A. Fouquette, Lynn Franey, Shelby Grad, Russ Loar, Jon Nalick, Holly J. Wagner and Lesley Wright.
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