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J R R Tolkien

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The world still has a taste for tales about Middle-earth. Two weeks after the publication of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Children of Hurin," an unfinished novel edited by the late author's son, Christopher, more than 900,000 copies are in print worldwide, nearly double the original total, according to the U.S. publisher, Houghton Mifflin. The new book, a prequel to Tolkien's epic "The Lord of the Rings," was started by J.R.R. Tolkien in 1918 but eventually abandoned.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
With Peter Jackson's “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” set to hit theaters, the work of J.R.R. Tolkien is again about to satisfy millions of moviegoers. But what about the man who created it? Tolkien led a complicated and colorful life. Now a new Hollywood biopic looks to tell his story. “Tolkien,” as the project is tentatively called, will examine the author's life, particularly his formative years at Pembroke College and as a soldier in World War I, and how it influenced him and his work, according to a person familiar with the project who was not authorized to talk about it publicly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
An unfinished tale by J.R.R. Tolkien has been edited by his son into a completed work and will be released next spring, the U.S. and British publishers announced Monday. Christopher Tolkien has spent the last 30 years working on "The Children of Hurin," an epic tale his father began in 1918 and later abandoned. Excerpts of the work, which includes the elves and dwarfs of Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" and other works, have been published before.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Elizabeth Hand
The books go ever on and on. Forty years after his death at 81, works by J.R.R. Tolkien continue to appear. The latest, "The Fall of Arthur," lists nine works published during his lifetime ("The Lord of the Rings" trilogy appears as a single title) and 24 posthumously, including the 12-volume "History of Middle-Earth," edited by Tolkien's son and literary executor Christopher. After his father's death, Christopher left his own position at Oxford to devote his life to Tolkien's vast oeuvre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
With Peter Jackson's “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” set to hit theaters, the work of J.R.R. Tolkien is again about to satisfy millions of moviegoers. But what about the man who created it? Tolkien led a complicated and colorful life. Now a new Hollywood biopic looks to tell his story. “Tolkien,” as the project is tentatively called, will examine the author's life, particularly his formative years at Pembroke College and as a soldier in World War I, and how it influenced him and his work, according to a person familiar with the project who was not authorized to talk about it publicly.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2002 | JENNY PRICE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
David Salo is an expert in languages that exist only in the imaginary world of hobbits and elves. He has immersed himself in Quenya and Sindarin, languages created by author J.R.R. Tolkien for the inhabitants of Middle-earth in his "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy. So when filmmakers adapting the fantasy epic wanted to translate parts of their script from English into the two Elvish languages, they turned to Salo, a graduate student in linguistics at the University of Wisconsin in Madison.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Walking into Glen Goodknight's living room is much like strolling through a J.R.R. Tolkien novel. Scores of Tolkien characters live here--if only in framed depictions on walls and in the vivid imagination of Goodknight's weekly Tolkien discussion groups. The group is one of three that have met in the area since the 1960s, when Tolkien's books "The Hobbit" and "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy were cult favorites.
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crammed into a children's bookshop in Beverly Hills, Samuel Ellison could barely contain his glee as the cast from the upcoming movie "The Lord of the Rings" regaled the crowd with tales of noble knights and maidens fair. Ellison, a 36-year-old computer programmer whose mother read him J.R.R. Tolkien's fantasy stories when he was a child, was enthralled as actor Sean Astin strapped on a bronze sword over the waist of his worn jeans and draped a hobbit cape over his Gap V-neck sweater.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1998 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Line Cinema has committed upward of $130 million to make the most ambitious and costly film project in its history, a trilogy of films based on "The Lord of the Rings," J.R.R. Tolkien's classic series of fantasy novels. The three films will be shot simultaneously over the course of a year by Peter Jackson, a New Zealand film director best known for "Heavenly Creatures," the 1994 Kate Winslet-starring thriller, and "The Frighteners," a 1996 special-effects comedy with Michael J. Fox.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Elizabeth Hand
The books go ever on and on. Forty years after his death at 81, works by J.R.R. Tolkien continue to appear. The latest, "The Fall of Arthur," lists nine works published during his lifetime ("The Lord of the Rings" trilogy appears as a single title) and 24 posthumously, including the 12-volume "History of Middle-Earth," edited by Tolkien's son and literary executor Christopher. After his father's death, Christopher left his own position at Oxford to devote his life to Tolkien's vast oeuvre.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2010 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Simon Tolkien's new thriller, "The Inheritance," draws on the author's own as a former British criminal barrister and grandson of J.R.R. Tolkien. The murder mystery, his second, is set in 1950s Oxford and turns on the desperate pursuit of a jewel-encrusted relic of the original cross. Tolkien, 51, moved to Santa Barbara a year ago with his American-born wife, Tracy, and their two children. So what were your earliest memories of your grandfather? I think I remember most after he went to Bournemouth.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2009 | Claudia Eller and Rachel Abramowitz
Clearing the way to move forward with its two planned films of "The Hobbit," Warner Bros. resolved a nasty legal battle with the heirs of J.R.R. Tolkien over profit from the "Lord of the Rings" films. Last year, two of Tolkien's children, Christopher, 84, and Priscilla, 80, sued New Line, now a unit of Warner Bros., for an estimated $150 million that they claimed was owed from the three "Lord of the Rings" movies, which amassed $2.96 billion at the worldwide box office and at least $3 billion in DVD and other ancillary sales, according to the lawsuit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2009 | Nick Owchar
Why is Brunnhilde so angry? Many have tried -- Wagner and English poet William Morris among them -- to explain what made the most famous Valkyrie of Norse legend rage against her beloved Siegfried, but it's an enduring mystery: The eight pages of the Codex Regius of the Edda, a major source for that part of the Nibelung legend, were torn out long ago and lost. J.R.R.
TRAVEL
May 10, 2009 | Kelsey Ramos
Who knows how J.R.R. Tolkien would have designed a motel, but the Hobbit Motel in New Zealand seems to have real fantasy appeal. The strange little building with porthole-style windows is built into the side of a hill in Waitomo, a region on North Island known for its caves and waterfalls. Each Hobbit unit accommodates up to six people, with a double bed in the main living area and two sets of bunk beds in another room. All rooms also feature kitchenettes.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2008 | Rachel Abramowitz
SO "THE LORD OF THE RINGS" made no money. Let me amend that. The film trilogy, which grossed $2.96 billion worldwide at the box office and $3 billion or so more in DVD and ancillary markets, has not made any money for the heirs of J.R.R. Tolkien, author of the famous books. Tolkien obviously isn't Peter Jackson, who directed the franchise, or Liv Tyler or Viggo Mortensen, who starred in it, or New Line Cinema, the studio that financed it, or Miramax, which owned the film rights for a second but couldn't get the movie made, or producer Saul Zaentz, who bought the rights in 1976.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The world still has a taste for tales about Middle-earth. Two weeks after the publication of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Children of Hurin," an unfinished novel edited by the late author's son, Christopher, more than 900,000 copies are in print worldwide, nearly double the original total, according to the U.S. publisher, Houghton Mifflin. The new book, a prequel to Tolkien's epic "The Lord of the Rings," was started by J.R.R. Tolkien in 1918 but eventually abandoned.
BOOKS
March 2, 1986 | SUE MARTIN
Christopher Tolkien, that rascal, has been at his poppa's papers again! And guess what? He found more stories, in this case, two lays (or poems), "The Lay of the Children of Hurin" and "The Lay of Leithian," written between 1920 and 1931. This is the third volume of the History of Middle-earth, and there's another volume to come. Sigh. More notes and commentary, corrections and cross-references, index and glossary, "poems early abandoned" and "unwritten cantos."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2007 | From Reuters
More than 30 years after his death, a "new" book by J.R.R. Tolkien goes on sale today that may well be the author's last complete work to be published posthumously. Tolkien's son and literary executor, Christopher, now in his 80s, constructed "The Children of Hurin" from his father's manuscripts and said he tried to do so "without any editorial invention."
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