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BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gordy Speaks to Press: Legendary Motown Records founder Berry Gordy Jr. broke a 33-year policy against speaking to the press to condemn a new book on singer Michael Jackson. Gordy told a press conference that he is suing "Michael Jackson: The Magic and the Madness" author J. Randy Taraborrelli and his publisher, Carol Communications, for $100 million. Gordy claimed that the book defames him and sullies the reputation of Motown. Gordy's representatives were unable to produce a copy of the suit.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gordy Speaks to Press: Legendary Motown Records founder Berry Gordy Jr. broke a 33-year policy against speaking to the press to condemn a new book on singer Michael Jackson. Gordy told a press conference that he is suing "Michael Jackson: The Magic and the Madness" author J. Randy Taraborrelli and his publisher, Carol Communications, for $100 million. Gordy claimed that the book defames him and sullies the reputation of Motown. Gordy's representatives were unable to produce a copy of the suit.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
The Lady will indeed sing the blues if Diana Ross reads this exhaustively detailed, but unauthorized biography, which--for its many even-handed touches--paints an inevitably damning portrait of the ex-Supreme as an arrogant woman obsessively consumed with her own glamour and stardom. The trouble is that there's no classic tragedy built into the story: Ross, as portrayed by Taraborrelli (a former editor of Soul magazine), was unusually vain and ambitious even as a scrawny teen, so scant personality development emerges over the sprawling course of this 500-plus page rags-to-riches tale.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
The Lady will indeed sing the blues if Diana Ross reads this exhaustively detailed, but unauthorized biography, which--for its many even-handed touches--paints an inevitably damning portrait of the ex-Supreme as an arrogant woman obsessively consumed with her own glamour and stardom. The trouble is that there's no classic tragedy built into the story: Ross, as portrayed by Taraborrelli (a former editor of Soul magazine), was unusually vain and ambitious even as a scrawny teen, so scant personality development emerges over the sprawling course of this 500-plus page rags-to-riches tale.
HOME & GARDEN
May 30, 2009 | LAUREN BEALE
It's a far cry from Springfield, but comedic actor and "The Simpsons" voice artist Hank Azaria recently purchased a home in Bel-Air for $10 million. The gated traditional has seven bedrooms and 10 bathrooms in about 9,000 square feet of living space, according to the Multiple Listing Service. It sits on nearly three-quarters of an acre. Built in 1932, the two-story view home includes four fireplaces, a dance studio, an art studio, a den and a library.
BOOKS
July 7, 1991
MOUNTAIN LAUREL by Jude Deveraux (Pocket: $5.50). Opera diva, under hot and heavy escort of a jaunty sea captain, is coerced into delivering anti-abolitionist papers in exchange for her sister's freedom. DRAGON by Clive Cussler (Pocket Star: $5.95). This ninth time out, Dirk Pitt must outwit Japanese terrorists who are blowing up major American cities. SECOND CHILD by John Saul (Bantam: $5.99).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske
We did a triple double-take when we learned that the National Enquirer has bought first serial rights to the upcoming (unauthorized) bio on . . . Carol Burnett! Inquiring minds may recall that Burnett successfully sued the Enquirer for libel over a 1976 column item that made it appear as if Burnett had been drunk in a Washington, D.C., restaurant. Burnett's longtime press rep sputtered when we told him about the Enquirer's purchase: "You have got to be kidding!"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1995
Regarding Steve Hochman's summation of Michael Jackson's year (Pop Eye, Dec. 24): My, how determined we in the media are to see Michael Jackson dead and buried. As an artist, he's survived in show business for 25 years, but we don't really care about that. Why? Because his personal life is a circus. (As if there is one celebrity on the planet whose personal life isn't a circus!) Funny that no one really cared about Dean Martin until his death last week. Then the "appreciations" flowed like the fine wine Dino loved so much.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1988
How disappointing that no one other than the very superficial Little Richard could have been found to pay tribute to the Supremes during the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremonies ("Surprise: Speeches Highlight Rock 'n' Roll Show," by Robert Hilburn, Jan. 31). Was there no one to mention the fact that the Supremes' universal popularity in the '60s inspired so many young blacks to transcend boundaries of segregation with good old-fashioned hard work and determination? Not to mention the fact that the Supremes racked up more No. 1 singles than any other American group in the history of popular music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2005 | David Bauder, Associated Press
ABC News said it didn't pay for interviews on last week's Michael Jackson special -- but some of the subjects were paid nonetheless. The news program, "Michael Jackson's Secret World," contained interviews conducted for a British documentary on Jackson that aired in that country earlier this year. ABC paid for the U.S. rights to the film, and the British producers paid for some of the interviews.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | RUTH RYON, Times Staff Writer
Author Judith Krantz and her producer husband, Steve, have sold their Newport Beach retreat for just under its $4.5-million asking price. Krantz's newest book, "Sex and Shopping: Confessions of a Nice Jewish Girl" (St. Martin's Press), is due out in May. She has written 10 bestselling novels, from "Scruples" in 1978 to "The Jewels of Tesa Kent," published last fall. Several of her novels have been turned into miniseries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1993 | RICK MARIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The secret of Diana Ross' book, "Secrets of a Sparrow," is that--surprise-- there are no secrets. She reveals this startling news herself, as the climax to her 299-page memoir published by Villard this month. It comes in the final line of one of the many Ross-authored poems sprinkled throughout the book. "The secret is, there are no secrets," she writes. In person, Ross delivers the same line on her life and 30 years in show business.
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