Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJ Robert Oppenheimer
IN THE NEWS

J Robert Oppenheimer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Soviet spy chief's memoirs published here today claim that the late J. Robert Oppenheimer, head of the U.S. atomic bomb project during and after World War II, passed nuclear secrets to Soviet agents. The allegations were made by Gen. Pavel Sudoplatov, who was in charge of efforts to obtain atomic secrets from the West, and excerpts of them ran in the Sunday Telegraph. Time magazine will print excerpts in today's issue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
It's hard not to view Julius Robert Oppenheimer, the man often called the Father of the Atomic Bomb, as a tragic figure. His work directing the Manhattan Project ended a war but also ensured that we'd never again know total peace, the means of self-destruction having been brought to term. Which bothered him. As portrayed in "The Trials of J. Robert Oppenheimer," a rather moving "American Experience" documentary airing tonight on PBS, Oppenheimer was poorly cast as a weapons-grade Prometheus.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Was J. Robert Oppenheimer, builder of the world's first atomic bomb, the tortured, morally divided soul depicted in Roland Joffe's new film "Fat Man and Little Boy"? Or was he a man intently focused on succeeding, having made peace with his role at the helm of the top-secret $2-billion Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, N.M.?
BOOKS
April 10, 2005 | Gerald Holton, Gerald Holton is Mallinckrodt research professor of physics and research professor of the history of science at Harvard University and the author of several books, including "Einstein, History, and Other Passions" and "Victory and Vexation in Science."
Three days into the Atomic Energy Commission's 1954 hearings on physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer's security clearance, the AEC prosecutor, Roger Robb, read from the transcript of a secretly recorded interrogation of Oppenheimer 11 years earlier and asked whether Oppenheimer had accurately represented a particular incident. "I think I said little more than that [chemical engineer George] Eltenton was somebody to worry about ... ," Oppenheimer responded. "Then I invented a cock-and-bull story...."
NEWS
June 8, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did J. Robert Oppenheimer, Niels Bohr and other renowned Western physicists who helped develop atomic weapons in the 1940s knowingly leak some of their secrets to the former Soviet Union? An explosive revelation if it were true. A dynamite book. And a bombshell of a story. Now, just such an allegation has burst on the scene, and it has produced enough literary fallout to worry its authors and publisher alike.
BOOKS
April 10, 2005 | Gerald Holton, Gerald Holton is Mallinckrodt research professor of physics and research professor of the history of science at Harvard University and the author of several books, including "Einstein, History, and Other Passions" and "Victory and Vexation in Science."
Three days into the Atomic Energy Commission's 1954 hearings on physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer's security clearance, the AEC prosecutor, Roger Robb, read from the transcript of a secretly recorded interrogation of Oppenheimer 11 years earlier and asked whether Oppenheimer had accurately represented a particular incident. "I think I said little more than that [chemical engineer George] Eltenton was somebody to worry about ... ," Oppenheimer responded. "Then I invented a cock-and-bull story...."
NEWS
December 12, 2002 | Lee Margulies
Composer John Adams and librettist Alice Goodman, who collaborated on the operas "Nixon in China" and "The Death of Klinghoffer," have been commissioned by the San Francisco Opera to create an opera about the life of J. Robert Oppenheimer, who oversaw development of the atomic bomb. The opera, currently called "Doctor Atomic," is scheduled to premiere during the 2005-06 season, with Peter Sellars directing. It will be a co-production with Lyric Opera of Chicago. -- Lee Margulies
BOOKS
May 23, 2004 | Stanley I. Kutler, Stanley I. Kutler is the author of "The American Inquisition: Justice in the Cold War."
Jeremy BERNSTEIN is a physicist and gifted writer who has succeeded admirably in making the history and sociology of science understandable to laymen. His profiles of scientists appeared in the New Yorker for nearly 30 years and his book on Albert Einstein gained a wide audience. Until now, Bernstein never wrote at length about J. Robert Oppenheimer (or "Julius Robert Oppenheimer," as J.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1995 | LEE DYE
In the scores of television documentaries and newspaper and magazine articles flowing out of the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, there has been enough Monday morning quarterbacking to make any coach ill. Some of it is enlightening, and there cannot be too much discussion of an event that altered human history in such a tragic way. But some of it is a little weird.
BOOKS
May 23, 2004 | Stanley I. Kutler, Stanley I. Kutler is the author of "The American Inquisition: Justice in the Cold War."
Jeremy BERNSTEIN is a physicist and gifted writer who has succeeded admirably in making the history and sociology of science understandable to laymen. His profiles of scientists appeared in the New Yorker for nearly 30 years and his book on Albert Einstein gained a wide audience. Until now, Bernstein never wrote at length about J. Robert Oppenheimer (or "Julius Robert Oppenheimer," as J.
NEWS
December 12, 2002 | Lee Margulies
Composer John Adams and librettist Alice Goodman, who collaborated on the operas "Nixon in China" and "The Death of Klinghoffer," have been commissioned by the San Francisco Opera to create an opera about the life of J. Robert Oppenheimer, who oversaw development of the atomic bomb. The opera, currently called "Doctor Atomic," is scheduled to premiere during the 2005-06 season, with Peter Sellars directing. It will be a co-production with Lyric Opera of Chicago. -- Lee Margulies
BOOKS
April 29, 2001 | Norman Dubie
I am tired of the black-and-white photograph Of a government bunkhouse, tin and pine, And the orchids in the catalpa trees Shriveled to twine. A white birdcage Hangs from a rafter. This was the sleep of mathematics, the poor facts Of primrose. An MP struts With a large sack filled with rattlesnakes. The tar-paper windmill kneels out in the dunes, Battered hat of the Pilgrims. Beside the bunkhouse, A tower and checkpoint. Again, a large sack Slack with mind. The head of the Medusa inside.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1995 | LEE DYE
In the scores of television documentaries and newspaper and magazine articles flowing out of the 50th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima, there has been enough Monday morning quarterbacking to make any coach ill. Some of it is enlightening, and there cannot be too much discussion of an event that altered human history in such a tragic way. But some of it is a little weird.
NEWS
June 8, 1994 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Did J. Robert Oppenheimer, Niels Bohr and other renowned Western physicists who helped develop atomic weapons in the 1940s knowingly leak some of their secrets to the former Soviet Union? An explosive revelation if it were true. A dynamite book. And a bombshell of a story. Now, just such an allegation has burst on the scene, and it has produced enough literary fallout to worry its authors and publisher alike.
NEWS
April 18, 1994 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Soviet spy chief's memoirs published here today claim that the late J. Robert Oppenheimer, head of the U.S. atomic bomb project during and after World War II, passed nuclear secrets to Soviet agents. The allegations were made by Gen. Pavel Sudoplatov, who was in charge of efforts to obtain atomic secrets from the West, and excerpts of them ran in the Sunday Telegraph. Time magazine will print excerpts in today's issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2009 | Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
It's hard not to view Julius Robert Oppenheimer, the man often called the Father of the Atomic Bomb, as a tragic figure. His work directing the Manhattan Project ended a war but also ensured that we'd never again know total peace, the means of self-destruction having been brought to term. Which bothered him. As portrayed in "The Trials of J. Robert Oppenheimer," a rather moving "American Experience" documentary airing tonight on PBS, Oppenheimer was poorly cast as a weapons-grade Prometheus.
BOOKS
April 29, 2001 | Norman Dubie
I am tired of the black-and-white photograph Of a government bunkhouse, tin and pine, And the orchids in the catalpa trees Shriveled to twine. A white birdcage Hangs from a rafter. This was the sleep of mathematics, the poor facts Of primrose. An MP struts With a large sack filled with rattlesnakes. The tar-paper windmill kneels out in the dunes, Battered hat of the Pilgrims. Beside the bunkhouse, A tower and checkpoint. Again, a large sack Slack with mind. The head of the Medusa inside.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Was J. Robert Oppenheimer, builder of the world's first atomic bomb, the tortured, morally divided soul depicted in Roland Joffe's new film "Fat Man and Little Boy"? Or was he a man intently focused on succeeding, having made peace with his role at the helm of the top-secret $2-billion Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, N.M.?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|