Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJ Steven Griles
IN THE NEWS

J Steven Griles

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 6, 1985 | Associated Press
J. Steven Griles is being nominated as assistant secretary for land and minerals management in the Department of Interior, the White House said Tuesday. Griles has been acting assistant secreatry since 1983.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
June 24, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
Former Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton is urging a federal judge in Washington to show leniency in sentencing her former top deputy, but leaders of Indian and environmental organizations want J. Steven Griles to be given a stiff sentence for his crimes. Once described by GOP lobbyist Jack Abramoff as "our guy" at the Interior Department, Griles pleaded guilty in March to lying to Senate investigators as they looked into the scandal surrounding Abramoff.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
June 24, 2007 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
Former Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton is urging a federal judge in Washington to show leniency in sentencing her former top deputy, but leaders of Indian and environmental organizations want J. Steven Griles to be given a stiff sentence for his crimes. Once described by GOP lobbyist Jack Abramoff as "our guy" at the Interior Department, Griles pleaded guilty in March to lying to Senate investigators as they looked into the scandal surrounding Abramoff.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2004 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
Deputy Interior Secretary J. Steven Griles, a former lobbyist accused of violating rules governing relations between public officials and their former clients, was exonerated on virtually all charges Tuesday by the federal Office of Government Ethics. The ethics office based its determinations on an exhaustive report by the Interior Department's own inspector general. "This closes the issue," Interior Secretary Gale M. Norton said. "I am glad that we can now put these allegations behind us."
NATIONAL
March 17, 2004 | Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writer
Deputy Interior Secretary J. Steven Griles, a former lobbyist accused of violating rules governing relations between public officials and their former clients, was exonerated on virtually all charges Tuesday by the federal Office of Government Ethics. The ethics office based its determinations on an exhaustive report by the Interior Department's own inspector general. "This closes the issue," Interior Secretary Gale M. Norton said. "I am glad that we can now put these allegations behind us."
NATIONAL
January 11, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Interior Department's former No. 2 official has been told by federal investigators that he is a target in the corruption probe of onetime lobbyist Jack Abramoff. J. Steven Griles, former deputy Interior secretary during President Bush's first term, was notified by letter and told of possible charges at a meeting last week with Justice Department prosecutors, according to people familiar with the investigation.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The Justice Department recommended a dramatic reduction in the prison sentence of lobbyist Jack Abramoff, who became the key witness against lawmakers and congressional aides whom he spent years corruptly influencing. Prosecutors cited his work in an FBI investigation that sent numerous powerful people to prison, including former Rep. Bob Ney (R-Ohio) and former Deputy Interior Secretary J. Steven Griles. The scandal also contributed to the Republicans' losses in Congress. In 2006, Abramoff began serving nearly six years for a fraudulent Florida casino deal.
NEWS
July 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
The Senate on Thursday confirmed J. Steven Griles to be deputy secretary of the Interior Department, elevating a longtime ally and energy industry official to the agency's No. 2 job. By voice vote, the 53-year-old lobbyist and natural resources consultant was confirmed for the post to which President Bush nominated him in March.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1986 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian and Atty. Gen. John K. Van de Kamp threatened Monday to sue the federal government if it proceeds with plans next May that could lead to the leasing of tracts off the Southern California coast to oil and gas development. In a letter to Interior Secretary Donald P. Hodel, Van de Kamp said both he and the governor view the Interior Department's tentative plans to solicit oil company interest in the area as "potentially a very serious situation."
NEWS
June 23, 1987 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
Interior Secretary Donald P. Hodel on Monday denied that his agency had initiated action intended to strip the California Coastal Commission of its authority to regulate the environmental impact of offshore oil drilling in federal waters. In a statement that reiterated his criticisms of the state commission's efforts to protect the California coast, Hodel said, "The Interior Department had not proposed, and it does not seek, to decertify the commission."
NEWS
November 6, 1985 | Associated Press
J. Steven Griles is being nominated as assistant secretary for land and minerals management in the Department of Interior, the White House said Tuesday. Griles has been acting assistant secreatry since 1983.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | ROBERT GEHRKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Much of the Interior Department was without e-mail or Internet access Friday after a judge ordered the systems shut down to protect an Indian trust fund from potential hackers. Deputy Interior Secretary J. Steven Griles notified employees of the shutdown in a memo. "To the best of my knowledge, all relevant Interior agencies have disconnected their computer Internet access and the department's external network connections have been shut down," Griles wrote.
NATIONAL
June 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A federal judge chastised the Interior Department's former No. 2 official Tuesday and doubled his proposed prison term to 10 months for lying to senators in the Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal and making excuses about it in court. J. Steven Griles, 59, was the department's deputy secretary and is the highest administration official sentenced in the probe. He pleaded guilty to obstructing a congressional investigation, but on Tuesday his lawyers tried to deflect blame for his faulty testimony. U.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|