Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJ T Leroy
IN THE NEWS

J T Leroy

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2003 | Nancy Rommelmann, Special to The Times
By midnight, the party celebrating the wrap of the movie "The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things," based on elusive author J.T. LeRoy's semiautobiographical chronicle of truck-stop hustlers and quasi-redemption, had been distilled into one room in a sixth-floor suite at the Chateau Marmont. Earlier, on the patio, there'd been Jeremy Sisto, who appears in the film as a crystal-meth addict, saying, "J.T. is a very interesting person, in that he survived. But I bet he won't show up here."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2004 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
The lovely waif who presents herself to a guest on Carrie Fisher's couch turns out to be a man. "Ahm J.T.," says author J.T. LeRoy, whose life has been pretty much defined by his girlish good looks. Although tonight he wears a short manly haircut and genderless shirt and pants, LeRoy's fragile physique and exquisitely sculpted face project the essence of prettiness. This trick of fate, he learned as a child, was not to be ignored. Throughout his critically acclaimed writing (two novellas and one book of short stories)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2004 | Bettijane Levine, Times Staff Writer
The lovely waif who presents herself to a guest on Carrie Fisher's couch turns out to be a man. "Ahm J.T.," says author J.T. LeRoy, whose life has been pretty much defined by his girlish good looks. Although tonight he wears a short manly haircut and genderless shirt and pants, LeRoy's fragile physique and exquisitely sculpted face project the essence of prettiness. This trick of fate, he learned as a child, was not to be ignored. Throughout his critically acclaimed writing (two novellas and one book of short stories)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2003 | Nancy Rommelmann, Special to The Times
By midnight, the party celebrating the wrap of the movie "The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things," based on elusive author J.T. LeRoy's semiautobiographical chronicle of truck-stop hustlers and quasi-redemption, had been distilled into one room in a sixth-floor suite at the Chateau Marmont. Earlier, on the patio, there'd been Jeremy Sisto, who appears in the film as a crystal-meth addict, saying, "J.T. is a very interesting person, in that he survived. But I bet he won't show up here."
BOOKS
December 23, 2001
December 23, 2001 FICTION Southern California Rating 1 GIRL WITH A PEARL EARRING by Tracy Chevalier (Plume: $12) The woman who inspired a Vermeer painting. 2 PRODIGAL SUMMER by Barbara Kingsolver (HarperPerennial: $14) Tapestry of love in Appalachia. 3 HARRY POTTER & THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN by J.K. Rowling (Scholastic: $7.99) Showdown with Sirius Black. 4 THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF KAVALIER & CLAY by Michael Chabon (Picador: $15) Cousins in the comics biz.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003 | Mark Olsen
There are worse ways to start a career than by co-starring in a film that wins the top prizes at the Cannes Film Festival. Appearing in "Elephant," director Gus Van Sant's look at a suburban high school, 17-year-old John Robinson attended the festival but missed out on the awards ceremony because he had to get back home to Portland, Ore., for the state lacrosse finals as well as end-of-term exams. Not bad, considering he originally auditioned to be an extra.
NEWS
September 19, 2001 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What Carolyn See has done for Topanga Canyon, what Kate Braverman has done for palms, Susan Compo now does for Orange County in "Pretty Things" (Verse Chorus Press, $16.95, 203 pages), a raucous and ribald tale that follows its principal character from the suburban sprawl of Orange County to the mean streets of Hollywood, where she falls victim to the worst excesses of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll.
BOOKS
January 16, 2005
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction *--* *--* 1 The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (Riverhead: $14) A writer returns to Kabul to rescue the son of a childhood friend. 2 The Last Juror by John Grisham (Dell: $7.99) A killer on parole is bent on retribution as he returns to his small town. 3 Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon (Vintage: $12) An autistic teen seeks a killer. 4 Angels & Demons by Dan Brown (Pocket Books: $7.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- As Americans reacted with jaw-dropping disbelief this week to news of New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer's sexcapades, the Internet was swamped with commentary. And one new website, hoping to carve out a distinctive niche, bannered a provocative question to its readers: Should Silda Wall Spitzer stand by her man? "It's painful to see these women, time and time again be dragged out to these press conferences," answered actress Marlo Thomas.
BOOKS
February 13, 2005
*--* SO. CAL. RATING Fiction LAST WEEK WEEKS ON LIST *--* *--* 1 The Broker by John Grisham (Doubleday: $27.95) A 1 4 high-roller attorney is pardoned to lead the CIA to a powerful satellite surveillance system and the shadowy agents who want to buy it. 2 The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown (Doubleday: $24.95) A 2 98 Louvre curator's killing leads to clues hidden in Leonardo's paintings and a secret society with something to hide. 3 State of Fear by Michael Crichton (HarperCollins: $27.
MAGAZINE
January 28, 2007 | Kateri Butler, Kateri Butler has written for Details and L'Uono Vogue.
To describe a performance by Ron Athey is, at least in part, to sensationalize it. Double-headed dildos, "castration" by tuck with surgical staples, a crown of steel thorns, suspension by hooks through the back, a baseball bat. Blood flows. But a sacredness infuses. Ritual. Exorcism. Taboo. Transcendence. The body invaded. The body politic. AIDS, homophobia, addiction. Religious fanaticism, identity, oppression. Scenes from a harsh life. Pain as transformation, as a way to an altered state.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2007 | David Ehrenstein, Special to The Times
"I can imagine what Paris was like when it was hot. It's not hot anymore," Dennis Cooper said wistfully on the phone from Paris recently. That's certainly true of a city that these days is roiled by the uprisings of Arab immigrants in its suburbs and a contentious presidential election but that in the 1920s provided a home to Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein. It's now eight decades after Stein and her beloved Alice B.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|