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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991
Henry M. Schachte, 78, a former president of the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency. Schachte, who joined Thompson in 1963, was president of the agency in 1972 and 1973. He became chairman of Thompson's executive committee in 1969, and continued to head the committee when he became chief operating officer as well as president in 1972. He retired in 1974. Schachte was known for bringing a client's perspective to his agency, which hired him away from one of its clients, Lever Bros.
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NEWS
November 2, 1998 | JAMES PATTERSON
At 46, with the real and attractive prospect of becoming CEO of J. Walter Thompson--one of the world's largest advertising agencies--looming before me, I decided to move on to a second career. What I was doing--"second careering"--is probably a recurring daydream for many of you reading this column. So here's what happened to this ship jumper. For openers, I'm not really much of a dreamer, so I had begun to act on my second career years before I actually left my job at Thompson.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the bleakest of beginnings to the holiday season, the Los Angeles office of the ad agency J. Walter Thompson on Monday handed walking papers to about 35 employees--about one-third of its staff. The layoffs, which follow the agency's decision last week to drop the estimated $50-million Bally's Health & Tennis Corp. media-buying business, will take effect Jan. 1. The layoffs are across the board, from secretaries to senior vice presidents. "This is no time for pep rallies," said William M.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | (Denise Gellene)
Mitsubishi Motor Sales of America, unable to select a single agency to handle its coveted $60-million to $80-million retail advertising business, said two agencies would compete for each of the 40 regional accounts that make up the retail business. Those agencies are Deutsch LA and a team consisting of Grey Advertising in Los Angeles and Zimmerman & Partners in Florida--which separately handle several regional accounts.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Troubled J. Walter Thompson Co., whose two top executives were fired over the past week, named eight additional executives to its board Friday in a move that even the company says was designed to bolster support for the beleaguered chairman of JWT Group, its parent company. The additions balloon the size of Thompson's board to 26 members. Most of the new directors are long-time Thompson executives and all are regarded as "strong supporters" of Don Johnston, chairman of J.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1997 | (Denise Gellene)
Mitsubishi Motor Sales of America, unable to select a single agency to handle its coveted $60-million to $80-million retail advertising business, said two agencies would compete for each of the 40 regional accounts that make up the retail business. Those agencies are Deutsch LA and a team consisting of Grey Advertising in Los Angeles and Zimmerman & Partners in Florida--which separately handle several regional accounts.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | JAMES PATTERSON
At 46, with the real and attractive prospect of becoming CEO of J. Walter Thompson--one of the world's largest advertising agencies--looming before me, I decided to move on to a second career. What I was doing--"second careering"--is probably a recurring daydream for many of you reading this column. So here's what happened to this ship jumper. For openers, I'm not really much of a dreamer, so I had begun to act on my second career years before I actually left my job at Thompson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991
Henry M. Schachte, 78, a former president of the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency. Schachte, who joined Thompson in 1963, was president of the agency in 1972 and 1973. He became chairman of Thompson's executive committee in 1969, and continued to head the committee when he became chief operating officer as well as president in 1972. He retired in 1974. Schachte was known for bringing a client's perspective to his agency, which hired him away from one of its clients, Lever Bros.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the bleakest of beginnings to the holiday season, the Los Angeles office of the ad agency J. Walter Thompson on Monday handed walking papers to about 35 employees--about one-third of its staff. The layoffs, which follow the agency's decision last week to drop the estimated $50-million Bally's Health & Tennis Corp. media-buying business, will take effect Jan. 1. The layoffs are across the board, from secretaries to senior vice presidents. "This is no time for pep rallies," said William M.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1987 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Another top-level advertising executive affiliated with J. Walter Thompson Co. has resigned, the company announced Thursday. It said Bertram Metter resigned as chairman and chief executive of J. Walter Thompson USA, the domestic arm of the nation's fourth-biggest ad company. Thompson clients include Ford cars, Kodak film and Burger King restaurants.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Troubled J. Walter Thompson Co., whose two top executives were fired over the past week, named eight additional executives to its board Friday in a move that even the company says was designed to bolster support for the beleaguered chairman of JWT Group, its parent company. The additions balloon the size of Thompson's board to 26 members. Most of the new directors are long-time Thompson executives and all are regarded as "strong supporters" of Don Johnston, chairman of J.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1987 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Another top-level advertising executive affiliated with J. Walter Thompson Co. has resigned, the company announced Thursday. It said Bertram Metter resigned as chairman and chief executive of J. Walter Thompson USA, the domestic arm of the nation's fourth-biggest ad company. Thompson clients include Ford cars, Kodak film and Burger King restaurants.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1988 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
At the Brite Spot restaurant on Sunset Boulevard, coffee drinkers often ask for a sugar-free sweetener that is infrequently advertised and contains an ingredient linked to cancer. "All they ask for is Sweet'n Low," said restaurant manager Antonette Venetos of the saccharin sweetener contained in familiar pink packets. "I have never had customers ask for anything else," she said. "I think it's sort of a habit." It is a habit that has kept the family-run company that makes Sweet'n Low in business.
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