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BUSINESS
March 12, 1990 | From United Press International
Conviction Reversed in State Savings Case: A San Francisco federal judge Thursday overturned the conviction of financier J. William Oldenburg and his former lawyer on charges of lying on financial records in a $26-million State Savings & Loan fraud case. U.S. Atty. Joseph Rossoniello said he would seek a retrial of Oldenburg and his former attorney, Martin Mandel.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | From United Press International
A U.S. District Court jury convicted financier J. William Oldenburg Wednesday of one count in a $26.5-million savings and loan fraud case but deadlocked on six other counts and was dismissed by the judge. U.S. Atty. Joseph Russionello contended in the five-week trial that Oldenburg bilked the since-failed State Savings of Salt Lake City, which he controlled, by causing the thrift to buy a 363-acre Richmond, Calif., land parcel for $26.5 million in 1984.
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accused savings and loan looter J. William Oldenburg may not be living in the lap of luxury any longer. But he was able to drop by for a visit last week. On the day Oldenburg filled out a statement claiming to be indigent and in need of a public defender to represent him in his legal battles, he was staying in perhaps the grandest hotel suite in the country--the $6,000-a-night Ben Swig Suite at the Fairmont Hotel atop Nob Hill. With tax, that's $6,600.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1990 | From United Press International
A federal judge Thursday overturned the conviction of financier J. William Oldenburg and his former lawyer on charges of lying on financial records in the $26-million State Savings & Loan fraud case. The case was the first major trial in Northern California to test allegations of fraud stemming from the nationwide savings and loan crisis. Oldenburg, 51, former owner of the L.A.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | From United Press International
Real estate financier J. William Oldenburg and three former officers of a Utah-based savings and loan were indicted Friday for conspiracy to defraud the thrift of $26.5 million in 1984. The federal grand jury indictment names Oldenburg, 50, former chairman and owner of State Savings & Loan Assn. in Salt Lake City, as well as former thrift officers James Rossetti, 52; Nicholas L. Muccino, 59, and Martin L. Mandel, 44.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1989 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
With the national spotlight fixed on the mounting crisis in the nation's savings and loan industry, the calls are growing louder in Washington to accelerate the prosecution of those who played significant parts in causing hundreds of thrift collapses in the past six years. "Those who are corrupt, those who break the law, must be kicked out of the (savings and loan) business and they should go to jail," President Bush told Congress earlier this month. Who is responsible for these failures?
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accused savings and loan looter J. William Oldenburg may not be living in the lap of luxury any longer. But he was able to drop by for a visit last week. On the day Oldenburg filled out a statement claiming to be indigent and in need of a public defender to represent him in his legal battles, he was staying in perhaps the grandest hotel suite in the country--the $6,000-a-night Ben Swig Suite at the Fairmont Hotel atop Nob Hill. With tax, that's $6,600.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1990 | From United Press International
Conviction Reversed in State Savings Case: A San Francisco federal judge Thursday overturned the conviction of financier J. William Oldenburg and his former lawyer on charges of lying on financial records in a $26-million State Savings & Loan fraud case. U.S. Atty. Joseph Rossoniello said he would seek a retrial of Oldenburg and his former attorney, Martin Mandel.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1990 | From United Press International
A federal judge Thursday overturned the conviction of financier J. William Oldenburg and his former lawyer on charges of lying on financial records in the $26-million State Savings & Loan fraud case. The case was the first major trial in Northern California to test allegations of fraud stemming from the nationwide savings and loan crisis. Oldenburg, 51, former owner of the L.A.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | From United Press International
A U.S. District Court jury convicted financier J. William Oldenburg Wednesday of one count in a $26.5-million savings and loan fraud case but deadlocked on six other counts and was dismissed by the judge. U.S. Atty. Joseph Russionello contended in the five-week trial that Oldenburg bilked the since-failed State Savings of Salt Lake City, which he controlled, by causing the thrift to buy a 363-acre Richmond, Calif., land parcel for $26.5 million in 1984.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1989 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
With the national spotlight fixed on the mounting crisis in the nation's savings and loan industry, the calls are growing louder in Washington to accelerate the prosecution of those who played significant parts in causing hundreds of thrift collapses in the past six years. "Those who are corrupt, those who break the law, must be kicked out of the (savings and loan) business and they should go to jail," President Bush told Congress earlier this month. Who is responsible for these failures?
BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | From United Press International
Real estate financier J. William Oldenburg and three former officers of a Utah-based savings and loan were indicted Friday for conspiracy to defraud the thrift of $26.5 million in 1984. The federal grand jury indictment names Oldenburg, 50, former chairman and owner of State Savings & Loan Assn. in Salt Lake City, as well as former thrift officers James Rossetti, 52; Nicholas L. Muccino, 59, and Martin L. Mandel, 44.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1985 | BILL RITTER, San Diego County Business Editor
Sun Savings & Loan Assn. might be repaid $4 million it wrote off as a bad loan last summer, Sun officials said Friday. Sun's $4-million write-off was part of a $17.75-million commercial loan made in 1983 to Investment Mortgage International Inc. of San Francisco. The lead lender was Valley Federal Savings & Loan Assn. of Van Nuys. J.
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