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NEWS
December 9, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was her first jury trial as a Superior Court judge, and Joyce A. Karlin was facing pressure from all sides. She was about to decide the fate of Soon Ja Du, a Korean-born grocer convicted of killing a black girl in a crime that had stirred racial passions throughout Los Angeles. Black leaders were clamoring for justice. Hundreds of Korean-Americans had pleaded for leniency in letters to the judge.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2013 | By Scott Gold
It's not every day someone chases you down with citizenship papers to prove her name. Then again, Annie Shin managed to live for 64 years without being accused of killing someone. You do what you have to do. “My name is Annie Shin!” she shouted in fractured English, waving her heavily creased documents for emphasis. Then, in case there was any confusion: “No Du! No Du!” That name - Du - might not ring a bell. It's been a long time since a woman named Soon Ja Du shot Latasha Harlins in a liquor store at 91st and Figueroa streets.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1991
It is shameful the way the tragic death of Latasha Harlins is being used to further the political careers of Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner and certain community leaders. If Soon Ja Du was black instead of Korean, this case would not have been newsworthy. Reiner is using this case for his own personal ambition. His ruthless and irresponsible action would not only inflame racial tension and demagoguery but also destroy the career of Judge Karlin, make a mockery of our judicial system and install a kangaroo court to try and convict Soon Ja Du, not for manslaughter but for the crime of being Korean.
OPINION
July 31, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Historian Brenda E. Stevenson (pictured in her UCLA office, with an African sculpture) mostly writes about the long-gone - 18th and 19th century African Americans, and the lives of enslaved women. Then came the case that made history while L.A. watched: Korean-born shopkeeper Soon Ja Du killed black teenager Latasha Harlins over a bottle of orange juice. A jury convicted Du of voluntary manslaughter, but she was sentenced only to probation and community service. Stevenson's new book, "The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins," analyzes the other "no justice, no peace" case that echoes through the 1992 riots and into the present day. Thirteen days after the Rodney King beating, Harlins was shot and killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2013 | By Scott Gold
It's not every day someone chases you down with citizenship papers to prove her name. Then again, Annie Shin managed to live for 64 years without being accused of killing someone. You do what you have to do. “My name is Annie Shin!” she shouted in fractured English, waving her heavily creased documents for emphasis. Then, in case there was any confusion: “No Du! No Du!” That name - Du - might not ring a bell. It's been a long time since a woman named Soon Ja Du shot Latasha Harlins in a liquor store at 91st and Figueroa streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1992
I just completed reading Al Martinez's column, "A Ghost That Won't Go Away" (Jan. 16), pertaining to the killing of Latasha Harlins by Soon Ja Du last March. He is absolutely right; the ghost is not going away and neither am I. There are not enough words in the English language to properly relate my outrage over the sentencing of Soon Ja Du by Judge Karlin. A $500 fine, 400 hours of community service and probation for killing another human being is an affront not only to our judicial system, but also to Latasha Harlin's family.
OPINION
March 8, 1992
Judge Karlin's sentence of probation for Soon Ja Du and the judge's reasons for the sentence are correct (Feb. 25). The opponents of Judge Karlin and Mrs. Du in South Los Angeles are racists. By appealing the sentence, Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner is playing to the mob for votes like the D.A. in Tom Wolfe's "The Bonfire of the Vanities." JAMES M. KALLIS, Los Angeles
OPINION
June 14, 1992
The Times speculates with numerous reasons as to why Judge Joyce Karlin won reelection to the Superior Court ("Judge Karlin's Win Baffles Black Leaders," June 4), but failed to give the one reason why so many of us did vote for her: Latasha Harlins beat Soon Ja Du in the face viciously until Mrs. Du fell to the floor. Upon pulling herself up to the counter and picking up the gun, the gun discharged. (Mrs. Du was unaware of the hair trigger.) I believe Judge Karlin made a wise decision on the sentencing, and that is the reason many of us voted for her. ROXANNA H. FRANCESCONI Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
October 2, 1994
Regarding "Crossing the Culture Line" (by Lydia Chavez, Aug. 28): Activists Karen Bass and Bong Hwan Kim are among the best and the brightest in a new alliance of community coalition builders. I am pleased that they are finally receiving the recognition they so richly deserve. Louis Caldera Assembly Member, 46th District Los Angeles It's very telling that when Chavez mentions four Korean-American merchants who were murdered in 1986, she doesn't mention their names.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1991
I am deeply disturbed by the death of young Latasha Harlins. However, I am equally disturbed by the attempts to make this seem like yet another racially motivated incident. In the wake of the Rodney King incident it seems that this would be the easy thing to do. I am a police officer who works in the area where the Empire Market is located. I have spoken with Joseph Du and his family on numerous occasions. They have been terrorized by local gang members, shot at and threatened.
MAGAZINE
October 2, 1994
Regarding "Crossing the Culture Line" (by Lydia Chavez, Aug. 28): Activists Karen Bass and Bong Hwan Kim are among the best and the brightest in a new alliance of community coalition builders. I am pleased that they are finally receiving the recognition they so richly deserve. Louis Caldera Assembly Member, 46th District Los Angeles It's very telling that when Chavez mentions four Korean-American merchants who were murdered in 1986, she doesn't mention their names.
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN and FRANK CLIFFORD and TED ROHRLICH, This story was reported and written by Nancy Hill-Holtzman, Frank Clifford and Ted Rohrlich
Ira Reiner has become the first political casualty of the Los Angeles riots. First he lost two courtroom battles that helped trigger the riots--the effort to send Korean-born grocer Soon Ja Du to jail for killing a black teen-ager and, against all expectations, the effort to convict police officers in the videotaped beating of African-American motorist Rodney G. King. Then, in the wake of the riots, Reiner alienated his core constituency--Los Angeles's black community--by disqualifying the black judge who had been assigned to try the case of four young African-Americans charged in the beating of a white truck driver.
NEWS
August 9, 1992
As a Korean-American who has been in this country for 40 years, both as a white-collar engineer and a merchant, I assure you that Oh's belief that Soon Ja Du should have gone to prison, and that liquor store owners whose stores were burned and looted should not be permitted to rebuild them are at sharp variance with the great tide of Korean-American opinion. It is difficult to understand why a person with such radically anti-Korean views should be placed in a prominent position in which, by the very nature of her ethnicity, millions will believe that she is a token "Korean" component of the effort to rebuild Los Angeles.
OPINION
June 14, 1992
The Times speculates with numerous reasons as to why Judge Joyce Karlin won reelection to the Superior Court ("Judge Karlin's Win Baffles Black Leaders," June 4), but failed to give the one reason why so many of us did vote for her: Latasha Harlins beat Soon Ja Du in the face viciously until Mrs. Du fell to the floor. Upon pulling herself up to the counter and picking up the gun, the gun discharged. (Mrs. Du was unaware of the hair trigger.) I believe Judge Karlin made a wise decision on the sentencing, and that is the reason many of us voted for her. ROXANNA H. FRANCESCONI Los Angeles
OPINION
March 8, 1992
Judge Karlin's sentence of probation for Soon Ja Du and the judge's reasons for the sentence are correct (Feb. 25). The opponents of Judge Karlin and Mrs. Du in South Los Angeles are racists. By appealing the sentence, Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner is playing to the mob for votes like the D.A. in Tom Wolfe's "The Bonfire of the Vanities." JAMES M. KALLIS, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1992
I just completed reading Al Martinez's column, "A Ghost That Won't Go Away" (Jan. 16), pertaining to the killing of Latasha Harlins by Soon Ja Du last March. He is absolutely right; the ghost is not going away and neither am I. There are not enough words in the English language to properly relate my outrage over the sentencing of Soon Ja Du by Judge Karlin. A $500 fine, 400 hours of community service and probation for killing another human being is an affront not only to our judicial system, but also to Latasha Harlin's family.
OPINION
July 31, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Historian Brenda E. Stevenson (pictured in her UCLA office, with an African sculpture) mostly writes about the long-gone - 18th and 19th century African Americans, and the lives of enslaved women. Then came the case that made history while L.A. watched: Korean-born shopkeeper Soon Ja Du killed black teenager Latasha Harlins over a bottle of orange juice. A jury convicted Du of voluntary manslaughter, but she was sentenced only to probation and community service. Stevenson's new book, "The Contested Murder of Latasha Harlins," analyzes the other "no justice, no peace" case that echoes through the 1992 riots and into the present day. Thirteen days after the Rodney King beating, Harlins was shot and killed.
OPINION
October 27, 1991
For the last few months many of us in Los Angeles have been following the tragic story of the death of Latasha Harlins. Your coverage has been thorough, but your frequent referrals to both Latasha Harlins' and Soon Ja Du's race seems to me to exacerbate the misunderstanding and distrust not only between the African-American and Korean communities, but among us all. A terrible thing happened in March. A young woman's life was snuffed out. A family had a child, a sister, a cousin violently extracted from its midst.
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was her first jury trial as a Superior Court judge, and Joyce A. Karlin was facing pressure from all sides. She was about to decide the fate of Soon Ja Du, a Korean-born grocer convicted of killing a black girl in a crime that had stirred racial passions throughout Los Angeles. Black leaders were clamoring for justice. Hundreds of Korean-Americans had pleaded for leniency in letters to the judge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1991
The question Bill Boyarsky should have raised in his column "When Protest Edges Up to Racism" (Nov. 20): Is it racism or a reaction to racism? A racism that is so accepted by those outside the African-American community that others ignore it or try to justify it. Boyarsky was upset by the strong anti-Korean undertone of Brotherhood Crusade leader Danny Bakewell's speech; but is he upset at the fact that the vast majority of Korean businesses do...
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